Stratasys

3D printing applications for dental and orthodontic labs

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According to Proto3000, “Increase your capacity and fuel business growth by embracing digital dentistry. Based on PolyJet technology, Dental Series 3D Printers deliver smooth surfaces and lifelike details in materials specially engineered for dental and orthodontic use. You can accurately 3D print surgical guides, veneer try-ins, stone models and a range of orthodontic appliances using 3D data from oral scans and CAD designs. Stratasys 3D printers are ideal for printing precise and detailed surgical guides to improve your organization’s efficiency and workflow”.

 

 

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3D Print and Veterans throughout the nation

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According to the Veterans Affairs Center for Innovation (VACI),” recently launched the first nationwide medical 3D printing network through a collaboration with Stratasys, one of the largest manufacturers of 3D printers globally. As part of this effort, five 3D printers donated by Stratasys were installed in VA hospitals across the country, including Albuquerque, Boston, Orlando, San Antonio and Seattle”.

Veterans throughout the nation.

According to Garrett Grindle, a research scientist for HERL, says, “3D printing allows us an almost unlimited ability to customize the parts we need—because anything we can draw upon a computer, it can print out!””It’s really hard to make these devices in small quantities. 3D printing allows us to do that,” he tells us. Grindle also said that 3D printers make it easier to create contoured devices than current manufacturing techniques can. He cited a contoured joystick created by a HERL associate to fit the associate’s own hand and help him control his powered wheelchair. We want people to look at what people are using and say, ‘Wow! ‘That gear is as cool as a new cell phone. We’re doing this to get new technology into the hands of Veterans quickly’.

https://www.cleveland.va.gov/

3-D printing program creates customized products to assist Veterans in their rehabilitation

VA center using 3D printing to create devices to help Veterans feel whole

https://www.albuquerque.va.gov/pressreleases/3DOpenHouseRel040717.asp

https://www.visn4.va.gov/herl-3d-printing.asp

 

Cost-Effective ‘Vulcan’ Custom Dental

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Cost-Effective and Quick Dental Procedures. According to Boris Simmonds, Director of Technology Development at Vulcan, “The Stratasys 3D Printer is our most reliable piece of equipment and is a critical component to working successfully with clinicians at the front lines of digital dentistry”.3D printing offers substantial time savings. It only requires a few minutes of setup time and we can print as many as four high-precision jobs a day.”

http://www.stratasys.com/resources/search/case-studies/vulcan

The new material made by Stratasys

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According to Stratasys,” the new material made by Stratasys. They are Introducing elastomer on the F123 Series.
Redefine what’s possible with the elastomer. Now we can print directly from the F123 3D Printer.
The F123 Series combines an office-friendly design, “no-brainer” interface, a choice of materials and print speeds to fit each project – all topped off with Stratasys legendary engineering-grade performance and precision”.

http://materials.stratasys.com/sample/

 

 

3D Printed soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable

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3D Printed soft and stretchy wearable, can be so useful in fashion, medical industry.:)

 

Researchers develop soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearables A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University has created a highly sensitive soft capacitive sensor made of silicone and fabric that moves. Read more. Stratasys […]

via Researchers develop soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearables — world of chemicals

Solar-powered Stratasys FDM and 3D Printing

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German start-up Floatility has designed a light-weight, solar-powered, electric scooter.

This will be redefine modern commuting, and has said that Stratasys FDM and PolyJet 3D Printing solutions were absolutely integral to creating the functional prototype that brought their product from development to launch. — ScooterSurfer

 

German start-up Floatility has designed a light-weight, solar-powered, electric scooter to redefine modern commuting, and has said that Stratasys FDM and PolyJet 3D Printing solutions were absolutely integral to creating the functional prototype that brought their product from development to launch.

via German start-up Floatility has designed a light-weight, solar-powered, electric scooter to redefine modern commuting, and has said that Stratasys FDM and PolyJet 3D Printing solutions were absolutely integral to creating the functional prototype that brought their product from development to launch. — ScooterSurfer

McLAREN DEPLOYS STRATASYS ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TO IMPROVE 2017 CAR PERFORMANCE

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Formula 1 cars race at very high speeds – up to 227 mph (365 km/h)– utilizing power units that reach a maximum of 15,000 revolutions per minute (RPM). We  love McLAREN cars. They are awesome. (please drive safely and not too fast, please don’t text and drive).

McLAREN deploys STRATASYS additive manufacturing to improve 2017 car performance. They 3D-printed a structural bracket to attach the hydraulic line on the MCL32 race car using Stratasys FDM technology, leveraging a Fortus 450mc Production 3D Printer with carbon-fibre-reinforced nylon material (FDM® Nylon 12CF).

“They are consistently modifying and improving our Formula 1 car designs,” said Neil Oatley, Design and Development Director, McLaren Racing. “So the ability to test new designs quickly is critical to making the car lighter and, more importantly, increasing the number of tangible iterations in improved car performance.

“If we can bring new developments to the car one race earlier – going from new idea to new part in only a few days – this will be a key factor in making the MCL32 more competitive. By expanding the use of Stratasys 3D printing in our manufacturing processes, including producing final car components, composite lay-up and sacrificial tools, cutting jigs, and more, we are decreasing our lead times while increasing part complexity.”

“Formula 1 is one of the world’s best proving grounds for our additive manufacturing solutions,” said Andy Middleton, President, Stratasys EMEA. “As the Official Supplier of 3D-Printing Solutions to the McLaren-Honda Formula 1 team, we are working closely together to solve their engineering challenges in the workshop, in the wind-tunnel, and on the track. We believe that this, in turn, will enable us to develop new materials and applications that bring new efficiency and capability to McLaren Racing and other automotive designers and manufacturers.”

http://www.mclaren.com/formula1/partners/stratasys/mclaren-deploys-stratasys-additive-manufacturing-improve-2017-car-performance/