Research

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?
Are Likely to Increase in 2020.
According to ETFs consumers initially saw 3D printers as a “factory in every home, but they soon came to realize that the items they produced weren’t functional. As the hype fizzled out, new fears emerged in the manufacturing segment, and some companies using 3D printers saw year-over-year declines in their revenue. The rise and fall of additive manufacturing took place over a few short years, but that wasn’t the end of the story.”

According to TriLine“The share of renewables in meeting global energy demand is expected to grow by one-fifth in the next five years to reach 12.4% in 20232. RENW aims to offer long-term exposure to the growing future of energy,”

Additive manufacturing is on an upward trajectory as of late. This resurgence is due to the fact that the list of possible 3D-printable materials has more than doubled in the last five years.”

According to Dean Franks, the head of global sales at the additive manufacturing company, Autodesk, “believes that consumer products, industrial machinery, automotive and tooling applications are the growth opportunities for additive manufacturing. He believes that these industries will start to grow as the more established aerospace, medical and dental markets continue to grow.”
According to Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer at EOS, “predicts that 3D printing within healthcare will flourish because there is an increase in demand for personalized healthcare, treatments, and medical devices.”
According to the Morningstar North America Renewable Energy Index, which is designed, “to provide exposure to companies that operate across the full renewable energy supply chain, including renewable energy innovators, suppliers, adopters, and end-users.”
According to TriLine Index Solutions, the index and ETF development arm of Boone Pickens Capital Fund Advisors.”

Total 3D-Printing Index

The 3D Printing ETF Can Make A Comeback

Why Investments in Additive Manufacturing Are Likely to Increase in 2020

The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper

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The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper.
According to
Volkswagen Group, “The world’s largest 3D printed titanium pressure functional component ever produced on one of the most powerful brake test benches on the market! This is what it looks like when Bugatti prepares its first printed titanium brake caliper for series production.”

From comments,

Niels Cremer
Niels Cremer
7 months ago
Can 3d print brake calipers, can’t take higher frame rates for slow motion footage.

Reaper5.56 Xx
7 months ago
Can you 3d print better emission test.

Bassam Al-Rawi
7 months ago
Which 3D printer was used 😁

Qwerrrz
7 months ago
Looks like 3d printing just reached a new level. That’s insane.

Insert coolname
7 months ago
This is nothing new. I´ve seen 3D printed brake calipers in Formula Student cars.
vaporainwaves
7 months ago (edited)
I am pretty sure koenigsegg was faster to produce a functional 3D printed component from titanium. Outrageous.

MOTO-079
7 months ago
3d printed… still needs machining or are the brake pistons just gliding on a printed serves…

Callen Hurley
7 months ago
3D printing is the future of production.

Phar2Rekliss
7 months ago
Now lets see what 3D printed Inconel 750 parts can handle! Inconel is the next step level in material from Titanium for these kinds of purposes.

eLike
7 months ago
This brake caliper is made in ABS, people with a 3D printer will understand this.

Gavin 363
7 months ago
I’d be more impressed if the rotor was 3d printed.

Zachary Gamble
7 months ago
Not sure I would want a 3D printed caliper on my million dollar car.
SPIRIT01
7 months ago
Cnc machine is like a 3d metal printer , been around for a couple of years , idk I thought brembo and ceika , and all those other big brake kits I thought they had already printed out calipers.

sam sl
7 months ago
Just because things are 3D printed does not mean they are better.

kym516
7 months ago
Just saying, other manufacturers may have tested this idea before. I mean a 3d printed caliper can have lighter weight and better thermal control which is obvious enough for researches to be done. But still, good marketing peace of work. Hope this amazing technology can be used on consumer cars.

Boris Diamond
7 months ago
How hot was the calliper getting and how much was it deflecting? Mechanical properties are reduced at high temperatures, it’s impressive that it survived the test but I would like to know if it yielded or not and how many high load/temperature cycles it is capable of. It should be ok being Ti.
Oddvin Lorenzo Preinstad
7 months ago
3d printed car parts are probably normal in the future, imagine if your car breaks down and you have it brought to a mechanic. Today that mechanic has to order the parts which will take at least multiple days, with 3d printed parts it is a matter of hours,
.

Bugatti speeds up testing on its 3D-printed titanium brake caliper

Bugatti 3D printed titanium brakes to stop its $3 million Chiron supercar

3D Printing News Alert(3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces)

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3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces. According to Sebastian Pattinson, who conducted the research as a postdoc at MIT and associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart, “This work is new in that it focuses on the mechanical properties and geometries required to support soft tissues.3-D-printed clothing and devices tend to be very bulky. We were trying to think of how we can make 3-D-printed constructs more flexible and comfortable, like textiles and fabrics. The beauty of this technique lies in its simplicity and versatility. Mesh can be made on a basic desktop 3-D printer, and the mechanics can be tailored to precisely match those of soft tissue.”

http://news.mit.edu/2019/3-d-print-mesh-ankle-knee-braces-0619

Eckhart’s smart factory floor solutions using 3D printing

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According to Stratasys Eckhart,” is a leader in Industry 4.0 innovation, providing advanced solutions that streamline the harsh manufacturing environment. Eckhart provides solutions to some of the largest manufacturers in the world, designing tools, equipment, and automation that improve the life of the people tasked with running the line”.

 

https://embed.vidyard.com