MIT

Sand 3D Printer before and now

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According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
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7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

Is a sand 3D printer the future of Additive Manufacturing?

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3-D print colloidal crystals

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According to Mechanosynthesis Group, MIT, “Highlights from our publication on direct-write colloidal assembly, a new fabrication process combining principles of self-assembly with 3D printing.3-D print colloidal crystals.”
According to study co-author Alvin Tan, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, “If you blew up each particle to the size of a soccer ball, it would be like stacking a whole lot of soccer balls to make something as tall as a skyscraper. That’s what we’re doing at the nanoscale.
If you could 3-D print a circuit that manipulates photons instead of electrons, that could pave the way for future applications in light-based computing, that manipulate light instead of electricity so that devices can be faster and more energy efficient.
According to graduate student Justin Beroz, assistant professor of mechanical engineering Mathias Kolle, and an associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart. For the first time, we’ve shown that it’s possible to build macroscale self-assembled colloidal materials, and we expect this technique can build any 3-D shape, and be applied to an incredible variety of materials. Mr.Hart, the senior author of the paper.”

 

 

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-researchers-3-d-print-colloidal-crystals-0830

3D Printing News Alert(3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces)

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3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces. According to Sebastian Pattinson, who conducted the research as a postdoc at MIT and associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart, “This work is new in that it focuses on the mechanical properties and geometries required to support soft tissues.3-D-printed clothing and devices tend to be very bulky. We were trying to think of how we can make 3-D-printed constructs more flexible and comfortable, like textiles and fabrics. The beauty of this technique lies in its simplicity and versatility. Mesh can be made on a basic desktop 3-D printer, and the mechanics can be tailored to precisely match those of soft tissue.”

http://news.mit.edu/2019/3-d-print-mesh-ankle-knee-braces-0619

3-D printing with Cellulose

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According to John Hart and Sebastian Pattinson, a former postdoc in mechanical engineering who is now a lecturer at the University of Cambridge in the U.K., “demonstrated a technique using the world’s most abundant natural polymer-cellulose. at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. They are very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and they are proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing.
Cellulose offers many advantages over current plastics-based feedstocks: It’s inexpensive, renewable, biodegradable, mechanically robust, and chemically versatile. In addition, it’s widely used in pharmaceuticals, packaging, clothing, and a variety of other products, many of which could be customized using 3-D printing”.

 

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http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-researchers-accelerating-3d-printing-using-renewable-materials-1129

3-D Printing Ice Cream(3D Printed Food recipe (Chew ))

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Graduate students learned how to 3-D print ice cream in an additive manufacturing course at MIT.

According to John Hart, the Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor in Contemporary Technology and Mechanical Engineering at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. I very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and I’m proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing. The students’ final projects have included printers that they built specially to print molten glass and even soft-serve ice cream”.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-course-3-d-printing-101-0511

 

 

Gillette’s 3D Printed razors

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According to Donato Diez Gillette and Razor Maker™ co-founder and global brand manager, “Our partnership with Formlabs, and the power of their 3D printers enable consumers to have a say on how their razors should look. We are excited to work with our Boston neighbors to pilot this breakthrough concept of customization”.

https://formlabs.com/

https://gillette.com/en-us

https://formlabs.com/blog/gillette-uses-3d-printing-to-unlock-consumer-personalization/

4D printing Programmable Textiles

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According to the comments from the videos, ” 4D printing Programmable Textiles looks like, Lays potato chips are made. Once they’re produced on 3D printers, objects made of programmable materials continue to take shape, folding, unfolding or assembling themselves in response to outside stimuli such as light, movement, heat, pressure or water.

The programmable Materials consist of material compositions that are designed to become highly dynamic in form and function, yet they are as cost-effective as traditional materials, easily fabricated and capable of flat-pack shipping and self-assembly. These new materials include self-transforming carbon fiber, printed wood grain, custom textile composites and other rubbers/plastics, which offer unprecedented capabilities including programmable actuation, sensing and self-transformation, from a simple material”. 🙂

https://selfassemblylab.mit.edu/programmable-materials/

https://internetofthingsagenda.techtarget.com/feature/4D-printing-is-the-catchphrase-programmable-materials-the-newsmakers

 

3D printed personalized pills with MIT in Silicon Valley

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Multiply Labs makes robots that print customized pills.  A customer can select minerals, vitamins, or other compounds (caffeine, for instance) and specify dosages and release times.  This allows you to design a personalized capsule.  A two week supply is delivered to you.  You can update your capcule as your needs change.
According to their website, their technology allows supplements to be released in your body at different times throughout the day, optimizing the supplements’ absorption through a dissolution process.  The capsule is made up of two 3D printed compartments of varying thicknesses.  The “sooner release” corresponds to the compartment with the thinner wall, while the “later release” corresponds to the compartment with the thicker wall.  This technology uses knowledge of both robotics and pharmaceuticals.
Y Combinator, a startup incubator, has approached Multiply Labs to join it.  Multiply Labs has four co-founders, all in their 20s, Parietti (CEO), Tiffany Kuo MBA ’16 (head of marketing and operations), MBA candidate Joe Wilson (head of product), and Alice Melocchi (CTO).  According to Kuo “We took these ourselves when we first presented before Y Combinator,” she adds. “We equipped them with vitamins and a late-afternoon release of caffeine, to keep us at our best. And, hey, it worked.”

http://news.mit.edu/2016/print-me-a-pill-multiply-labs-1102

https://multiplylabs.com/

Color-Changing 3D Printables

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Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). according to Stefanie Mueller, she is the X-Consortium Career Development Assistant Professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering,” Largely speaking, people are consuming a lot more now than 20 years ago, and they’re creating a lot of waste and by changing an object’s color, you don’t have to create a whole new object every time.”
“Appearance adaptivity, in general, is always a superior feature to have, and we’ve seen many other kinds of adaptivity enabled with manufactured objects,” says Changxi Zheng, an associate professor at Columbia University who co-directs Columbia’s Computer Graphics Group.
“This work is a true breakthrough in being able to change the color of objects without repainting them.”:)

 

http://news.mit.edu

LIVING TATTOOS!

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3D Printed tattoos can be helpful to recognize stress and health.:)

MIT engineers have devised a 3-D printing technique that uses a new kind of ink made from genetically programmed living cells. The cells are engineered to light up in response to a variety of stimuli. When mixed with a slurry of hydrogel and nutrients, the cells can be printed, layer by layer, to form […]

via LIVING TATTOOS! — venitism