wearable technologies

Flexible circuits for 3D printing

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According to Tomke Glier of the University of Hamburg Scientific Reports,” the University of Hamburg and DESY has developed a 3D printing-capable process that can be used to produce transparent and mechanically flexible electronic circuits. The electronics consist of a network of silver nanowires that can be printed in a suspension and embedded in various flexible and transparent plastics (polymers). This technology can enable many new applications such as printable light-emitting diodes, solar cells or tools with integrated circuits. The researchers demonstrate the potential of their process with, among other things, a flexible capacitor.
This technology can enable new applications such as printable light-emitting diodes, solar cells or tools with the integrated circuit”.

http://www.desy.de/

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/gadgets-news/scientists-develop-new-3d-printing-technology-paves-way-for-improvement-in-wearable-devices/articleshow/69082813.cms

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3D Printed soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable

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3D Printed soft and stretchy wearable, can be so useful in fashion, medical industry.:)

 

Researchers develop soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearables A team of researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Harvard John A Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University has created a highly sensitive soft capacitive sensor made of silicone and fabric that moves. Read more. Stratasys […]

via Researchers develop soft, stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearables — world of chemicals

NASA’s Meteorite resistant chain mail 4D Printed fabric

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NASA’s Meteorite resistant chain mail 4D Printed fabric.

NASA are stepping straight into the future of textiles with their 4D printed ‘space fabric’—a metallic material intended to be used like ‘chain mail’ to protect astronauts and spacecraft alike during their missions.The material remains fold-able and retains the ability to change shape easily.

4D print self-transformation can be more useful in future wearable technologies.:)

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov

3D / 4D printing inflatable structure

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Nottingham Trent University  in Nottingham, England.

Professor Philip Breedon’s research interests and latest projects center on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilization of ‘’ smart materials for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals. research interests and latest projects center on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilisation of ‘smart materials’ for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals.His research interests and latest projects centre on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilisation of ‘smart materials’ for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals.

https://www.ntu.ac.uk/staff-profiles/architecture-design-built-environment/philip-breedon

4D printed’ material

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is in Livermore California.

Researchers from the laboratory, add hollow gas-filled “micro-balloons” into silicone-based ink, the researchers engineered the material so it can be compressed or “programmed” at an elevated temperature, remaining in that state as it cools. When reheated, the gas in the micro-balloons expands, causing the structures to return to their original shape. When combined with 3D printing, this shape memory behavior is often referred to as “4D printing,” with the fourth dimension being time.

“The impressive part was how well the structures could recover their shape after they were reheated,” said LLNL researcher Amanda Wu, the lead author. “We didn’t see a distorted structure, we saw a fully recovered structure. Because the silicone network is completely cross-linked, it holds the part together, so the structure recovers its original shape in a predictable, repeatable way.”

In the beginning, the process was an accelerated aging test to see if the material would be useful. 4D printing took on a pretty large compression set and that made them think if it was permanent. We weren’t really thrilled about that, but researchers tried to see if it could recover its shape when heated. They tested it and it was a successful experiment.

https://www.llnl.gov/news/lab-researchers-achieve-4d-printed-material