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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component

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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component. The three-year project has received additional support from the University of Pittsburgh ($200,600), resulting in a total grant of $1,003,000.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry today announced that the Department of Energy will award 113 grants totaling $121 million to 103 small businesses in 29 states.

According to Albert and Dr.Xiayun (Sharon) Zhao, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt, “LPBF AM is capable of making complex metal components with the reduced cost of material and time. There is a desire to employ the appealing AM technology to fabricate sophisticated HGPTCs that can withstand higher working temperature for next-generation turbines. However, because there’s a possibility that the components will have porous defects and be prone to detrimental thermomechanical fatigue, it’s critical to have a good quality assurance method before putting them to use. The quality assurance framework we are developing will immensely reduce the cost of testing and quality control and enhance confidence in adopting the LPBF process to fabricate demanding HGPTCs.”

 

 

https://www.engineering.pitt.edu/News/2019/DOE-Grant-for-3D-Printed-Turbine-Components/

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3D Printing News Alert(3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces)

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3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces. According to Sebastian Pattinson, who conducted the research as a postdoc at MIT and associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart, “This work is new in that it focuses on the mechanical properties and geometries required to support soft tissues.3-D-printed clothing and devices tend to be very bulky. We were trying to think of how we can make 3-D-printed constructs more flexible and comfortable, like textiles and fabrics. The beauty of this technique lies in its simplicity and versatility. Mesh can be made on a basic desktop 3-D printer, and the mechanics can be tailored to precisely match those of soft tissue.”

http://news.mit.edu/2019/3-d-print-mesh-ankle-knee-braces-0619

Advanced biomaterials and 3D printing €1m NSF and SFI research grant

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RCSI professor named the joint recipient of €1m NSF and SFI research grant for 3D bioprinting. This will help healthcare research for patients and consumers 3D printing technology.
Advanced biomaterials and 3D printing will be harnessed to repair joint cartilage.
According to Prof. O’Brien, Prof. Seth Donohue from the University of Massachusetts, Prof. Helen McCarthy from QUB in Northern Ireland, “We are really pleased to have received this US-Ireland R&D Partnership grant. By partnering with leading international groups in Ireland and the United States, the team has the combined skill set to develop a transformative technology that moves beyond the state of the art which can thus have real clinical impact.”
This funding will support RCSI’s innovative research into bone repair and regeneration, using biomaterial scaffolds functionalized for gene delivery.

https://www.depuysynthes.com/

http://www.rcsi.ie/index.jsp?p=100&n=110&a=11737

https://www.rcsi.com/dublin/

First 3D Printing site on hospital campus to print ‘ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS’

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According to San Daniele del Friuli, Udine, Italy based co. and CEO of LimaCorporate Luigi Ferrari, “We are proud to be the first company to bring 3D printing of implants directly to a hospital organization, where the collaboration between top-ranked surgeons and engineers can drive innovation and easier access to patients in the US. This is what defines Lima. A company that has in the past, and will continue in the future,
strive to transform orthopedics by challenging the status quo,”.

The new facility, operated by Lima on the HSS main campus on New York’s Upper East Side.

https://www.limacorporate.com/news/41/limacorporate-heads-first-3d-printing-site-on-hospital-campus-to-address-complex-custom-orthopedic-implants.html

Mustang Shelby GT500 with 3D printed brake parts

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Ford Mustang Shelby GT500-Dual-Clutch or 10-Speed Automatic.
According to Ford, it is “using 3D printing in the manufacturing world, bridging the gap between abstract and practical.” The company is “fully invested in the latest commercial 3D printing innovations.”
Pricing for the 2018 Ford Shelby Super Snake starts at $113,445, including the donor Mustang.
2019 Shelby GT500 Top Speed is Over 200 MPH. The S197 generation of the Ford Mustang in Shelby GT500 form could top 202 miles per hour (325 km/h) at the Nardo test track in Italy.

The Super Snake, available with an automatic or manual transmission, begins as a Mustang GT with its 5.0-liter V-8, but a supercharger and tuning kick it up to a claimed 670 horsepower. Pay extra for a Whipple or Kenne Bell supercharger, and Shelby claims the engine will generate up to 750 horsepower.

http://www.autonews.com/article/20181204/OEM01/181209873/mustang-shelby-gt-ford-3d-augmented-reality-michigan

https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/2018/12/04/shelby-mustang-ford-manufacturing-parts/2205519002/

https://corporate.ford.com/homepage.html

3-D Printing Ice Cream(3D Printed Food recipe (Chew ))

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Graduate students learned how to 3-D print ice cream in an additive manufacturing course at MIT.

According to John Hart, the Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor in Contemporary Technology and Mechanical Engineering at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. I very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and I’m proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing. The students’ final projects have included printers that they built specially to print molten glass and even soft-serve ice cream”.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-course-3-d-printing-101-0511

 

 

WSU researchers 3D printed glucose biosensors

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WSU researchers create 3D-printed glucose biosensors. According to Arda Gozen and Yuehe Lin, faculty in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, the research has been published in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta,” 3D printing can enable manufacturing of biosensors tailored specifically to individual patients. This can potentially bring down the cost. For large‑scale use, the printed biosensors will need to be integrated with electronic components on a wearable platform. But, manufacturers could use the same 3D printer nozzles used for printing the sensors to print electronics and other components of a wearable medical device, helping to consolidate manufacturing processes and reduce costs, even more.

Our 3D printed glucose sensor will be used as the wearable sensor for replacing painful finger pricking. Since this is a noninvasive, needleless technique for glucose monitoring, it will be easier for children’s glucose monitoring”.

3D‑printed glucose biosensors created by WSU

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003267018310705?via%3Dihub

3D Print and Veterans throughout the nation

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According to the Veterans Affairs Center for Innovation (VACI),” recently launched the first nationwide medical 3D printing network through a collaboration with Stratasys, one of the largest manufacturers of 3D printers globally. As part of this effort, five 3D printers donated by Stratasys were installed in VA hospitals across the country, including Albuquerque, Boston, Orlando, San Antonio and Seattle”.

Veterans throughout the nation.

According to Garrett Grindle, a research scientist for HERL, says, “3D printing allows us an almost unlimited ability to customize the parts we need—because anything we can draw upon a computer, it can print out!””It’s really hard to make these devices in small quantities. 3D printing allows us to do that,” he tells us. Grindle also said that 3D printers make it easier to create contoured devices than current manufacturing techniques can. He cited a contoured joystick created by a HERL associate to fit the associate’s own hand and help him control his powered wheelchair. We want people to look at what people are using and say, ‘Wow! ‘That gear is as cool as a new cell phone. We’re doing this to get new technology into the hands of Veterans quickly’.

https://www.cleveland.va.gov/

3-D printing program creates customized products to assist Veterans in their rehabilitation

VA center using 3D printing to create devices to help Veterans feel whole

https://www.albuquerque.va.gov/pressreleases/3DOpenHouseRel040717.asp

https://www.visn4.va.gov/herl-3d-printing.asp

 

3D printed dissolvable medical implants

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3d printed dissolvable medical implants
In the human body, magnesium is an essential mineral that actually helps maintain the structural integrity of bones. It also degrades quickly when exposed to oxygen, water, and salts, all of which are abundant in the body.

According to assistant professor at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, mechanical and materials engineering Michael Sealy, “Instead of having these permanent metal implants, let’s have one that degrades over time. Let’s eliminate this whole idea of a second surgery to have these implants removed. Instead of peening as a surface treatment, where I just hammer my outer surface, I’m going to print so many layers, and then hammer it, and then print a few more layers, and then hammer that,”

 

https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/sealy-world-class-3d-printers-set-to-create-dissolvable-medical-implants/

https://engineering.unl.edu/michael-sealy-nebraskas-world-class-3d-printers-work-create-dissolvable-medical-implants/

https://www.unl.edu/

https://news.unl.edu/newsrooms/today/article/sealy-world-class-3d-printers-set-to-create-dissolvable-medical-implants/