USA

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?
Are Likely to Increase in 2020.
According to ETFs consumers initially saw 3D printers as a “factory in every home, but they soon came to realize that the items they produced weren’t functional. As the hype fizzled out, new fears emerged in the manufacturing segment, and some companies using 3D printers saw year-over-year declines in their revenue. The rise and fall of additive manufacturing took place over a few short years, but that wasn’t the end of the story.”

According to TriLine“The share of renewables in meeting global energy demand is expected to grow by one-fifth in the next five years to reach 12.4% in 20232. RENW aims to offer long-term exposure to the growing future of energy,”

Additive manufacturing is on an upward trajectory as of late. This resurgence is due to the fact that the list of possible 3D-printable materials has more than doubled in the last five years.”

According to Dean Franks, the head of global sales at the additive manufacturing company, Autodesk, “believes that consumer products, industrial machinery, automotive and tooling applications are the growth opportunities for additive manufacturing. He believes that these industries will start to grow as the more established aerospace, medical and dental markets continue to grow.”
According to Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer at EOS, “predicts that 3D printing within healthcare will flourish because there is an increase in demand for personalized healthcare, treatments, and medical devices.”
According to the Morningstar North America Renewable Energy Index, which is designed, “to provide exposure to companies that operate across the full renewable energy supply chain, including renewable energy innovators, suppliers, adopters, and end-users.”
According to TriLine Index Solutions, the index and ETF development arm of Boone Pickens Capital Fund Advisors.”

Total 3D-Printing Index

The 3D Printing ETF Can Make A Comeback

Why Investments in Additive Manufacturing Are Likely to Increase in 2020

Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component

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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component. The three-year project has received additional support from the University of Pittsburgh ($200,600), resulting in a total grant of $1,003,000.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry today announced that the Department of Energy will award 113 grants totaling $121 million to 103 small businesses in 29 states.

According to Albert and Dr.Xiayun (Sharon) Zhao, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt, “LPBF AM is capable of making complex metal components with the reduced cost of material and time. There is a desire to employ the appealing AM technology to fabricate sophisticated HGPTCs that can withstand higher working temperature for next-generation turbines. However, because there’s a possibility that the components will have porous defects and be prone to detrimental thermomechanical fatigue, it’s critical to have a good quality assurance method before putting them to use. The quality assurance framework we are developing will immensely reduce the cost of testing and quality control and enhance confidence in adopting the LPBF process to fabricate demanding HGPTCs.”

 

 

Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million to Develop Better Quality Control for 3D Printing Turbine Components

3D Printing News Alert(3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces)

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3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces. According to Sebastian Pattinson, who conducted the research as a postdoc at MIT and associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart, “This work is new in that it focuses on the mechanical properties and geometries required to support soft tissues.3-D-printed clothing and devices tend to be very bulky. We were trying to think of how we can make 3-D-printed constructs more flexible and comfortable, like textiles and fabrics. The beauty of this technique lies in its simplicity and versatility. Mesh can be made on a basic desktop 3-D printer, and the mechanics can be tailored to precisely match those of soft tissue.”

http://news.mit.edu/2019/3-d-print-mesh-ankle-knee-braces-0619

Advanced biomaterials and 3D printing €1m NSF and SFI research grant

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RCSI professor named the joint recipient of €1m NSF and SFI research grant for 3D bioprinting. This will help healthcare research for patients and consumers 3D printing technology.
Advanced biomaterials and 3D printing will be harnessed to repair joint cartilage.
According to Prof. O’Brien, Prof. Seth Donohue from the University of Massachusetts, Prof. Helen McCarthy from QUB in Northern Ireland, “We are really pleased to have received this US-Ireland R&D Partnership grant. By partnering with leading international groups in Ireland and the United States, the team has the combined skill set to develop a transformative technology that moves beyond the state of the art which can thus have real clinical impact.”
This funding will support RCSI’s innovative research into bone repair and regeneration, using biomaterial scaffolds functionalized for gene delivery.

https://www.depuysynthes.com/

http://www.rcsi.ie/index.jsp?p=100&n=110&a=11737

https://www.rcsi.com/dublin/

First 3D Printing site on hospital campus to print ‘ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANTS’

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According to San Daniele del Friuli, Udine, Italy based co. and CEO of LimaCorporate Luigi Ferrari, “We are proud to be the first company to bring 3D printing of implants directly to a hospital organization, where the collaboration between top-ranked surgeons and engineers can drive innovation and easier access to patients in the US. This is what defines Lima. A company that has in the past, and will continue in the future,
strive to transform orthopedics by challenging the status quo,”.

The new facility, operated by Lima on the HSS main campus on New York’s Upper East Side.

https://www.limacorporate.com/news/41/limacorporate-heads-first-3d-printing-site-on-hospital-campus-to-address-complex-custom-orthopedic-implants.html

Mustang Shelby GT500 with 3D printed brake parts

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Ford Mustang Shelby GT500-Dual-Clutch or 10-Speed Automatic.
According to Ford, it is “using 3D printing in the manufacturing world, bridging the gap between abstract and practical.” The company is “fully invested in the latest commercial 3D printing innovations.”
Pricing for the 2018 Ford Shelby Super Snake starts at $113,445, including the donor Mustang.
2019 Shelby GT500 Top Speed is Over 200 MPH. The S197 generation of the Ford Mustang in Shelby GT500 form could top 202 miles per hour (325 km/h) at the Nardo test track in Italy.

The Super Snake, available with an automatic or manual transmission, begins as a Mustang GT with its 5.0-liter V-8, but a supercharger and tuning kick it up to a claimed 670 horsepower. Pay extra for a Whipple or Kenne Bell supercharger, and Shelby claims the engine will generate up to 750 horsepower.

http://www.autonews.com/article/20181204/OEM01/181209873/mustang-shelby-gt-ford-3d-augmented-reality-michigan

https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/2018/12/04/shelby-mustang-ford-manufacturing-parts/2205519002/

https://corporate.ford.com/homepage.html

3-D Printing Ice Cream(3D Printed Food recipe (Chew ))

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Graduate students learned how to 3-D print ice cream in an additive manufacturing course at MIT.

According to John Hart, the Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor in Contemporary Technology and Mechanical Engineering at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. I very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and I’m proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing. The students’ final projects have included printers that they built specially to print molten glass and even soft-serve ice cream”.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-course-3-d-printing-101-0511

 

 

WSU researchers 3D printed glucose biosensors

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WSU researchers create 3D-printed glucose biosensors. According to Arda Gozen and Yuehe Lin, faculty in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, the research has been published in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta,” 3D printing can enable manufacturing of biosensors tailored specifically to individual patients. This can potentially bring down the cost. For large‑scale use, the printed biosensors will need to be integrated with electronic components on a wearable platform. But, manufacturers could use the same 3D printer nozzles used for printing the sensors to print electronics and other components of a wearable medical device, helping to consolidate manufacturing processes and reduce costs, even more.

Our 3D printed glucose sensor will be used as the wearable sensor for replacing painful finger pricking. Since this is a noninvasive, needleless technique for glucose monitoring, it will be easier for children’s glucose monitoring”.

3D‑printed glucose biosensors created by WSU

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003267018310705?via%3Dihub