University of Minnesota

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

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A 3D-printed transparent skull implant.
According to Suhasa Kodandaramaiah, Ph.D., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Benjamin Mayhugh Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Science and Engineering “What we are trying to do is to see if we can visualize and interact with large parts of the mouse brain surface, called the cortex, over long periods of time. This will give us new information about how the human brain works. This technology allows us to see most of the cortex in action with unprecedented control and precision while stimulating certain parts of the brain.”

According to Kodandaramaiah and Ebner, the research team was led by fourth-year mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Leila Ghanbari. The research team included several post-doctoral associates, graduate students and undergraduate students including Russell E. Carter (neuroscience), Matthew L. Rynes (biomedical engineering), Judith Dominguez (mechanical engineering), Gang Chen (neuroscience), Anant Naik (biomedical engineering), Jia Hu (biomedical engineering), Lenora Haltom (mechanical engineering), Nahom Mossazghi (neuroscience), Madelyn M. Gray (neuroscience) and Sarah L. West (neuroscience). The team also included partners at the University of Wisconsin including researcher Kevin W. Eliceiri and graduate student Md Abdul Kader Sagar, “This new device allows us to look at the brain activity at the smallest level zooming in on specific neurons while getting a big-picture view of a large part of the brain surface over time. Developing the device and showing that it works is just the beginning of what we will be able to do to advance brain research.”

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

University of Minnesota block M and wordmark

Research Brief: 3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain

Transparent 3D-Printed Skull Implant Opens New Window for Brain Researchers

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3D printed active materials for robots

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3D printed active materials for robots, inspiration from invertebrates.

According to Dr. Ed Habtour, ARL researcher who specializes in nonlinear structural dynamics and lead author Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani, “Current military robots have two major limitations that restrict them from mimicking the locomotion of biological organisms. Unlike current 3-D printed DEAs, the new fabrication method does not require post-processing steps, such as assembly, drying or annealing. With the new 3-D printing method, the Solider can take advantage of the unique actuation properties of soft DEAs at the fundamental materials level with microscale resolution and complexity, with minimal prior expertise.”

 

https://www.arl.army.mil/www/default.cfm?article=3197

https://www.army.mil/article/203832/

 

3D-Print Eyes(bonafide eye)

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At the beginning of 2015, Ray Flynn couldn’t see a thing in front of him. The 80-year-old suffered from a common disease called dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which caused him to lose his central line of sight and required him to rely on his peripheral vision instead. Flynn couldn’t use ATMs and had trouble distinguishing weeds from flowers in his garden. But in June, Flynn received the world’s first retinal implant to treat AMD, a procedure that left the patient with a bonafide bionic eye.

According to the researchers and Michael McAlpine, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of Minnesota at the University of Minnesota,” we were able to 3D-print on a hemispherical surface an array of light receptors. Published in the journal Advanced Materials on Tuesday, the study is the first to reveal a way to create a 3D-printed bionic eye with this method.
Bionic eyes are usually thought of as science fiction, but now we are closer than ever using a multi-material 3D printer he also mention that we have a long way to go to routinely print active electronics reliably, but our 3D-printed semiconductors are now starting to show that they could potentially rival the efficiency of semiconducting devices fabricated in micro-fabrication facilities plus, we can easily print a semiconducting device on a curved surface, and they can’t.”

https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/3d-print-bionic-eye/

https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/research-brief-researchers-3d-print-prototype-bionic-eye

https://www.newsweek.com/scientists-figured-3d-print-bionic-eyes-1096306

3D Printed device for injured spinal cords

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According to Ann Parr, M.D., PhD., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Medical School Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurosurgery and Stem Cell Institute,”This is a very exciting first step in developing a treatment to help people with spinal cord injuries. Currently, there aren’t any good, precise treatments for those with long-term spinal cord injuries.”

https://interestingengineering.com/tiny-3d-printed-device-could-save-injured-spinal-cords

Medical Images to 3D Print Human Organ Models

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A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. In this study, the research team took MRI scans and tissue samples from three patients’.

According to lead researcher Michael McAlpine, an associate professor of mechanical engineering in the University of Minnesota’s College of Science and Engineering, “We are developing next-generation organ models for pre-operative practice. The organ models we are 3D printing are almost a perfect replica in terms of the look and feel of an individual’s organ, using our custom-built 3D printers,” and 2017 recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

“We think these organ models could be ‘game-changers’ for helping surgeons better plan and practice for surgery. We hope this will save lives by reducing medical errors during surgery.”

3D printed organ models are made using hard plastics or rubbers.

Researchers tested the tissue and developed customized silicone-based inks that can be “tuned” to precisely match the mechanical properties of each patient’s prostate tissue.

“The sensors could give surgeons real-time feedback on how much force they can use during surgery without damaging the tissue,” said Kaiyan Qiu, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering postdoctoral researcher and lead author of the paper. “This could change how surgeons think about personalized medicine and pre-operative practice.”

The researchers then attached soft, 3D printed sensors to the organ models and observed the reaction of the model prostates during compression tests and the application of various surgical tools.:)

https://twin-cities.umn.edu/news-events/researchers-3d-print-lifelike-artificial-organ-models

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/admt.201700235