Magnetic 3D Bioprinting from Nano3D Biosciences

Image Posted on Updated on

Magnetic 3D Bioprinting from Nano3D Biosciences

——————————————–

Magnetic 3D bioprinting uses magnetic nanoparticles to 3D print cell structures. The magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible, i.e., they can be in contact with living cells without causing adverse effects.  The process makes cells magnetic by tagging them with magnetic particles.  Once the cells become magnetic, external magnetic forces are used to 3D printed the cells into specific cell structures.  A technique called magnetic levitation is used to levitate cells in a container using a magnet above the container.  Levitation of the cells causes the cells to aggregate rapidly.

 

The first 3D bioprinting system was commercially made available by Nano3D Biosciences.  This technology is targeted for use in pharmaceutical industry.  This technology can be used for building simple cellular structures such a spheroids and rings as well as complex structures such as aortic valves.

 

 

http://www.n3dbio.com/products/magnetic-3d-bioprinting/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_3D_Bioprinting

Mushtari: A 3D Printed Wearable Skin from MIT Mediated Matter in collaboration with Stratasys

Image Posted on Updated on

——————————————–

Mushtari: A 3D Printed Wearable Skin from MIT Mediated Matter in collaboration with Stratasys

—————————————————————–

Professor Neri Oxman of MIT Media Lab revealed a 3D printed wearable at TED2015 in May 2015 in Vancouver.  The wearable is designed to host living matter and was called Mushtari, meaning giant.  Mushtari was 3D printed using a color multi-material 3D Printer developed by Stratasys. This is the world’s first wearable that combines multi-material additive manufacturing and synthetic biology.

photosynthesis to convert sunlight to sugar.  The compatible microbes consume the sugar to

Mushtari is based on synthetic biology.  It uses a symbiotic relationship between a photosynthetic microbe and compatible microbes.  The photosynthetic microbes use generate substances useful for the wearer such as pigments, food, fuel and scents. In future, the wearer could trigger the production of these substances.

 

According to Neri Oxman, “This is the first time that 3D printing technology has been used to produce a photosynthetic wearable piece with hollow internal channels designed to house microorganisms. Inspired by the human gastrointestinal tract, Mushtari hosts synthetic microorganisms, a co-culture of photosynthetic cyanobacteria and E. coli bacteria that can fluoresce bright colors in darkness and produce sugar or biofuels when exposed to the sun. Such functions will in the near future augment the wearer by scanning our skins, repairing damaged tissue and sustaining our bodies, an experiment that has never been attempted before.”

 

 

 

http://matter.media.mit.edu/environments/details/wanderers-living-mushtari

 

http://www.materialecology.com/projects/details/mushtari