Ted Talk

The emergence of “4D printing”

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The emergence of “4D printing”


Imagine things can replicate by itself an appropriate design. In my opinion, we need 4D printing to make water pipes for snowing region.:)
MIT researcher Skylar Tibbits works on self-assembly — the idea that instead of building something (a chair, a skyscraper).
He is an artist and computational architect. Skylar Tibbits is working on “smart” components that can assemble themselves.
3D printing has grown in sophistication since the late 1970s; TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits is shaping the next development, which he calls 4D printing, where the fourth dimension is time.
This emerging technology will allow us to print objects that then reshape themselves or self-assemble over time.
Think a printed cube that folds before your eyes, or a printed pipe able to sense the need to expand or contract.

http://www.selfassemblylab.net/

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3D printing & medical applications

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3D printing & medical applications


3D printing reduce the work time and it has solution and advancement for the medical field. Carsten Engel is  biomedical engineer from the University of Brussels (ULB).currently he is working as a researcher at SIRRIS (Collective Centre of the Belgian Technology Industry) which has the biggest European Additive Manufacturing machine parc. His main work involves R&D projects in the field of biomedical and aerospace applications.

Polymer based 3d printing from Carbon3D

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Polymer based 3d printing from Carbon3D

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Carbon3D has announced a new approach to polymer based 3D printing.  Their approach is based on CLIP (Continuous Liquid Interface Production) technology which continuously grows objects from resin instead of the conventional approach of layer by layer printing.  Joseph DeSimone, co-founder of Carbon3D and Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry, UNC, mentioned in his Ted talk in Canada, that this technique was inspired by the film Terminator 2, in which the T-1000 robot rises from a pool of metallic liquid.  According to DeSimone, objects created by conventional 3D printing are weak because they are made up of multiple layers obtained by 2D printing over and over again.  In contrast, CLIP based 3D printing is 25-100 times faster and generates much stronger objects.

 

 

http://www.chem.unc.edu/people/faculty/desimone/

http://carbon3d.com/news/carbon3d-introduces-clip/

http://3ddeconference.com/category/innovation/

http://www.ted.com/talks/joe_desimone_what_if_3d_printing_was_25x_faster?language=en

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-31918215