Teaching Tech

Achieve true 3D printing with non planar slicing

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According to Teaching Tech,” This is the most interesting thing I’ve done with my 3D printer in some time. Instead of printing in a series of 2D planes stacked up to form a 3D shape (2.5D), this non planar technique creates geometry with true 3D tool paths that can eliminate the steps often seen on shallow surfaces. Based on the amazing Masters Thesis of Daniel Ahlers and the University of Hamburg, this development can be tried yourself if you are willing to put in some time to setting it up.”

From comments,
Pinned by Teaching Tech
Teaching Tech
1 day ago
Hi everyone, some updates:
– A bunch of people pointed out that Windows 10 now has an embedded Linux environment. I installed this and went through the process again. I had a couple of errors and had to manually install missing cpan libraries via the command line. Slic3r did successfully compiled, but only runs via command line rather than with a graphical user interface as seen in this video. I’m sure there’s a way to add even more modules to get the GUI working, but it’s beyond my knowledge.
– Some people also mentioned setting up a dual boot configuration. This is another great suggestion but I need to have my Windows PC on at all times to keep my video production going, so not suitable for me.
– There have been some viewers pointing me towards ‘air brush’ nozzles. I’ve ordered a set, they look ideal for this technique.

falchulk
1 day ago
Windows subsystem for Linux 2.0 is much better then 1.0. Should be in the windows 10 1909 release.

grandaspanna
1 day ago
I have this working with WSL under Windows 10 and have used VcXsrv as the Xserver. It also allows pretty easy access between filesystems for loading STLs and writing back the gcode.

Doug Moody
1 day ago
@grandaspanna Yes. Most people with 3D printers know about gcode and STLs. They know how to calibrate their printers and make it print. But the software is somewhat mysterious, as are the effects one little change to a parameter in the slicer.
But what I think would help the most is a simple, already compiled executable program that would run and turn a traditional printer into a “true” 3D printer, using the methods discussed in this video.
I never even thought that my printer was a “2-1/2 D” printer until I watched this video. But now it makes so much more sense to do it this way. In fact, it makes sense to go one step further and make printers with five axes, so that the print nozzle is always perpendicular to the extrusion. When we get to that point, then we can start work on finer nozzles and plastic that extrudes with more granularity.
I do believe that the “big boys” who are printing airplane parts on demand have the right idea but that hasn’t filtered down to the hobbyists like me yet.

Gonun
2 days ago
This is awesome. No idea why I’m watching this as I don’t have a 3D printer, but it’s awesome.

Tina Yoga
2 days ago
I had recently been thinking of this kind of technique. I had thought that this technique would be more easily implemented with a delta based 3D printer. So that the print head could be tilted.

Gerhard Wilkens
1 day ago
you cant tilt the nozzle on a delta. the nozzle will always be parallel to the printbed

Tim Milgart
1 day ago
@Gerhard Wilkens Yes, but it would be logically more easily to do it on a delta based 3d printer. (As I see it, but i’m only a engineer, so everything can be done in my optic).

Filamax
1 day ago
it is very much doable, but is highly dependent on the Delta Design, my current delta prototype will actually do this, once i get the new board in, and some Titan Extruder spares. Cause the hot end hangs below the effector plate, with the magnetic arms on my printer giving a good range of movement the code can be adjusted to tilt the head. But it depends if slic3r can be adjusted to generate G-Code like this

Arek R.
2 days ago
That’s cool, but too much difficult work on software side.
I think it could really take of if CURA would make experimantal mode with it.
Then people would just need to remove the fan shroud, on stock Ender 3 that’s actually easy,

Žan Pekošak
2 days ago
This looks amazing! I will have to try it out very soon. Clean the Z screw and modify the CR10S hotend to have a part cooling fan and a decent head cooling fan…will see what I can do and if I manage it I will share it on Thingiverse.

Xander Vice
2 days ago
I mentioned this on the other video, but the next logical steps for non-planar are hot ends that have steeper angles, taller height to width ratio. Basically, with a steeper angled nozzle, it could fit into tighter curves. This also needs an entirely different cooling system, though, but that shouldn’t be too difficult to develop.
Non-planar also nicely extends into 5axis printing, which should be the next step of developments for the future of FDM.

 

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