Singapore

The World’s Fastest Dental Model 3D Printer

Posted on Updated on

This is a guest contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop

Structo, Singapore-based dental 3D printer manufacturer partners with Ulab, a U.S.-based orthodontic treatment planning software developer to modernize the production of clear dental aligners. The two companies announced their partnership focused on supplying various segments of the market with their new dentistry solutions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: www.structo3d.com

In the framework of the new project, Structo’s DentaForm 3D printer will be used together with the uLab uDesign treatment planning software to create aligner models. The 3D printer will become a part of the uLab’s uPrint ecosystem.

 Joe Breeland, chief commercial officer at uLab commented: “DentaForm’s high throughput capabilities of printing up to 10 arches in 30 minutes is exactly what existing uLab customers need to help them with their in-office aligner manufacturing.” 

The companies’ cooperation will also include working on additional solutions, such as Structo’s Velox desktop 3D printer and Structo Elements, a modular 3D printing system capable of printing up to 500 models per day.

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asDMnBZDXZg (Structo 3D)

“Our teams will also collaborate on new products that will involve the rest of our portfolio,” said a chief commercial officer at Structo, Dhruv Sahgal. “On top of our Velox desktop 3D printer, another exciting new solution that we are working on is an aligner specific module for our Elements automated and modular factory in a box.”

Structo introduced its first dental 3D printers back in 2014 – they were intended for building patient-specific devices and dental models. Structo’s proprietary technology MSLA (Mask Stereolithography) allows to print much faster than other SLA 3D printers. One of the key partners of the company is ClearCaps, a German clear dental aligner manufacturer. Last year, ClearCaps managed to produce 250 models per day with the DentaForm system.

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lE8TxgpXx9M (Structo 3D)

The new joint project involves the integration of the DentaForm system into the uLab platform that allows dentists to create digital models based on intraoral 3D digital scans of the patients. uLab allows orthodontists to quickly design treatment plans for aligners and create dental movement plans. The resulting 3D digital model can be exported directly to 3D printers in dental practitioner’s office. Since the software’s launch in summer of 2018, it was utilized in treatment of over 13,000 dental patients. 

Structo DentaForm is the seventh 3D printer integrated into the uLab platform. Others include Carbon M2; the Objet 500 and 260VS Dental selection from Stratasys; the Formlabs Form 2 and Vida and Micro XL from EnvisionTec. 

Advertisements

3D-printed bathroom

Posted on Updated on

NTU Singapore develops technology that can 3D-print a bathroom unit within a day
According to Assoc Prof Tan Ming Jen,” 3D-printing a bathroom unit could help manufacturers halve their production time while lowering transport costs, carbon emissions, and materials wastage. Less space is required to create and store the same number of PBUs in land-scarce Singapore since conventional PBUs take about two weeks before they can be ready.

By being able to print-on-demand, companies can save on their inventory costs as well as manpower costs, as they don’t have to hold as much stock and their workers can be redeployed to do higher-level tasks. This approach improves the safety of the workplace since robots are doing the construction of the bathroom unit.

According to team lead from Sembcorp Design and Construction, and Sembcorp Architects & Engineers Er Lie Liong Tjen, “3D printing technology allows concrete to be printed and customized. The complicated shape of a PBU and its walls can be developed and printed at a faster pace to satisfy the needs of individual customers as no formwork or molds are required, whereas conventional construction of PBUs with concrete or lightweight wall panels always limit the possibilities of design. In addition, 3D printing can build curvilinear profiles rather than rectilinear forms”.

https://media.ntu.edu.sg/NewsReleases

https://www.ntu.edu.sg

The HP-NTU Digital Manufacturing Corporate Laboratory long-term relationship

Posted on Updated on

According to NRF CEO, Professor Low Tech Seng, “Corporate laboratories are an integral part of our strategy to anchor joint R&D partnerships between our universities and companies in areas that have direct relevance to the growth of industries in Singapore, The HP-NTU Digital Manufacturing Corporate Laboratory is significant to our long-term competitiveness in the advanced manufacturing sector and ensures that we stay relevant in the Fourth Industrial Revolution that is evolving and growing rapidly worldwide. It will also strengthen our capabilities to support multinational companies for expansion from Singapore into the region.”

https://www.tctmagazine.com/3d-printing-news/hp-digital-manufacturing-singapore-national-research-lab/

https://www.britcham.org.sg/static-pages/minister-iswaran-and-britcham-president-reference-importance-of-uk-singapore-relationship-at-17th-annual-business-awards

3D-printed concrete structure

Posted on Updated on

According to Asst Prof Pham from NTU’s School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, “We envisioned a team of robots which can be transported to a work site, print large pieces of concrete structures and then move on to the next project once the parts have been printed.
This research builds on the knowledge we have acquired from developing a robot to autonomously assemble. But this latest project is more complex in terms of planning, execution, and on a much larger scale.”

 

http://media.ntu.edu.sg/NewsReleases/Pages/newsdetail.aspx?news=071eed39-cec0-4ecb-9514-49cbad16e3ca

 

Singapore Centre for 3D Printing of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Image Posted on Updated on

Singapore Centre for 3D Printing of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 

Singapore Centre for 3D Printing (SC3DP) is a center of excellence at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, for consolidating cutting edge technology and research in the area of 3D printing. SC3DP has secured close to $150m funding from various sources. The goal of SC3DP is to expand in the following industry sectors (1) Future of Manufacturing, (2) Aerospace and Defense, (3)  Building and Construction, and (4) Marine and offshore.  SC3DP provides Ph.D. programmes as well as Master’s programmes for students interested in 3D printing.

According to Professor Chua Chee Kai, Executive Director, Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, “Singapore, a place where East meets West, and a place where 3D Printing can be rooted back to the late 1980s, must take leadership in developing new 3D Printing manufacturing technologies and training future 3D Printing engineer leaders, for Singapore and the Asia Pacific region. … By taking advantage of Singapore’s position and strong manufacturing reputation, coupled with anticipating infrastructures and an accessible pool of talents, SC3DP offers an ideal setting in Asia to attract and support global businesses.”:)

http://sc3dp.ntu.edu.sg

http://sc3dp.ntu.edu.sg/NewsnEvents/Pages/News-Detail.aspx?news=b15005bc-3ba8-44e4-97b3-88ebb5ba708d

3D Printing Jewelry

Posted on Updated on

3D Printing Jewelry


According to the Aaron Issac’s Singapore based company, ” Polychemy is using 3D printers to make jewelry.   Polychemy uses 3D printers to produce a wax mold that is cast into metal.  They analyze traffic on Google to find out what type of jewelry people are searching for.  Then they develop that type of jewelry”.:)

http://money.cnn.com/2015/02/12/technology/3d-printer-custom-jewelry/

http://www.polychemy.com/