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3D Printing technique and nanoscale fabrication

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According to Sourabh Saha, the paper’s lead and corresponding author is now an assistant professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, “Instead of using a single point of light, we project a million points simultaneously. This scales up the process dramatically because instead of working with a single point that has to be scanned to create the structure, we can use an entire plane of projected light. Instead of focusing on a single point, we have an entire focused plane that can be patterned into arbitrary structures.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/627104/original

 

3D Printing Technique Accelerates Nanoscale Fabrication a Thousandfold

The 3D printers contribution to save the environment, with rebuilding ceramic corals reefs

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The 3D printer’s contribution to saving environment rebuilding ceramic corals reefs.
According to Ezri Tarazi, an industrial design professor at the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, who is collaborating with other researchers from his university, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and Bar-Ilan University on the project, “As a diver, I was seeing the early signs of this five years ago. I was thinking, how can we take a reef that’s totally collapsing—which means there are no branches of corals anymore because they collapse, and fish cannot hide—and how can we reignite life in it? Because I’m an industrial designer, the idea to print corals was the first thing coming to mind.”

 

The 3D printers contribution to save the environment, with rebuilding ceramic corals reefs

ISRAELI RESEARCHERS ARE USING 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGY TO HELP REBUILD CORAL REEFS 

 

Can we print a new set of coral reefs before they’re gone?

 

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts