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3-D Printed Food And Your Health

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Jin-Kyu Rhee, associate professor at Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea. She described her work at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology’s annual meeting. This meeting is called,” EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY 2018,” was held April 21-25 in San Diego.

Imagine a home appliance that, at the push of a button, turns powdered ingredients into food that meets the individual nutrition requirements of each household member. Although it may seem like something from science fiction, new research aimed at using 3-D printing to create customized food could one day make this a reality.

The Research Team built a platform that uses 3-D printing to create food micro structures that allow food texture and body absorption to be customized on a personal level. One day, people could have cartridges that contain powdered versions of various ingredients that would be put together using 3-D printing and cooked according to the user’s needs or preferences.

3-D printing of food works much like 3-D printing of other materials in that layers of raw material are deposited to build up a final product. In addition to offering customized food options, the ability to 3-D print food at home or on an industrial scale could greatly reduce food waste and the cost involved with storage and transportation. It might also help meet the rapidly increasing food needs of a growing world population.:)

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-04/eb2-3pf041318.php

http://www.ewha.ac.kr/mbs/ewhakr/index.jsp

http://experimentalbiology.org/2018/Home.aspx

https://medkit.info/2018/04/24/3-d-printed-food-could-change-how-we-eat/

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3D Printing Blood Vessel Networks

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3-D printers can assemble raw materials into very complex products. Researchers had previously fabricated a single blood vessel, which amounted to no more than a long and slender tube. The next hurdle is to create complex, branching networks of blood vessels.

A team of engineers led by Dr. Shaochen Chen of the University of California, San Diego, aimed to improve on current 3-D printers to better engineer complex tissues like blood vessel networks. Their research was supported by NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Results were published online in advance of the April 2017 issue of Biomaterials.

“Almost all tissues and organs need blood vessels to survive and work properly. This is a big bottleneck in making organ transplants, which are in high demand but in short supply,” says Chen. “3-D bioprinting organs can help bridge this gap, and our lab has taken a big step toward that goal.”

The results show that a complex tissue resembling blood vessels can be formed using a 3-D printer. The ultimate challenge for this research team is to engineer heart tissue with a complex network of blood vessels. Such tissues might be used to replace damaged heart muscle or for drug testing. 🙂

https://ucsd.edu.

3d Printing Jobs (3D Fluids PhD Chemist Intern)

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3d Printing Jobs (3D Fluids PhD Chemist Intern)



San Diego, California

 

https://h30631.www3.hp.com/job/san-diego/3d-fluids-phd-chemist-intern/3544/3850504

3D Printed Microscopic Robotic Fish

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According to the researcher Wei Zhu, “developing the technology Nano-engineers at the University of California,  San Diego has been able to 3D print microscopic robots.  They developed tiny robots shaped like fish.  These are called microfish and are smaller than the width of human hair.  Nanoparticles are added to various parts of the microfish to make them functional.  Platinum nanoparticles installed in their tails help them propel forward.  Magnetic nanoparticles installed in their head can be used to steer them.

The microfish are developed using a 3D printing technology called microscale continuous optical printing.  This technology allows 3D printing hundreds of microfish within seconds. The shapes of the microbots to be changed, for example, to experiment with different shapes of fish such as sharks vs. ray fish, or experiment with other shapes such as birds.

We have developed an entirely new method to engineer nature-inspired microscopic swimmers that have complex geometric structures and are smaller than the width of a human hair. With this method, we can easily integrate different functions inside these tiny robotic swimmers for a broad spectrum of applications.”  For example, toxic neutralizing particles can be included in the microfish to use them for detoxifying liquids.  In future, this technology may allow delivery of medicine to specific parts of the body via a bloodstream”.

3D-Printed Artificial Microfish. Advanced Materials. 2015

http://jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1797

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/microscopic-3d-printed-smart-fish-swim-bloodstream-deliver-drugs-remove-toxins/

http://www.medicaldaily.com/robotic-drugs-3d-printed-fish-bots-made-platinum-nanoparticles-can-swim-through-blood-349976

http://www.wsj.com/video/3-d-printed-tiny-fish-could-be-used-for-drug-delivery/F0100ED9-B13F-4247-AD65-BD8F0DCF8FB2.html

https://wp.me/p64ptu-au

Organovo: 3d Printing Living Tissue

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Organovo 3d Printing Living Tissue

According to the Organovo,” This is a medical research company headquartered in San Diego which designs and develops three-dimensional human tissue. The living 3D printed tissue can be used for testing drugs before giving the drugs to a real person.  Organovo uses a proprietary bioprinting platform called NovoGen for 3D printing tissue.

Pharmaceutical companies conventionally perform testing on animals or on cells in Petri-dishes.  Both methods of testing are very different from testing on a living person.  Therefore several clinical trials fail when tried on living person even if they were considered successful on animals or cells in petri-dish.  Organovo technology bridges this gap by providing 3D tissue models that are much closer to a living person.  Pharmaceutical companies can use the 3D tissues developed using this technology for testing.

In 2014 Organovo announced the commercial release of exVive3DTM Human Liver Tissue for preclinical drug discovery testing.  In April 2015, Organovo presented results of 3D printing in vitro 3D kidney tissue at the 2015 Experimental Biology conference in Boston.  In 2015 L’Oreal signed an agreement with Organovo to produce 3D printed skin for use in testing of cosmetics.  The long-term goal of Organovo’s 3D bioprinting technology is to be able to create organs for transplantation”.:)

http://www.organovo.com

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organovo

Orgonovo Company Profile Video

 

 

Youtube video of interview with Keith Murphy, CEO of Organovo

Youtube Video: 3D Bioprinter