RepRap

3D Printing Materials: Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS)

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3D Printing Materials: Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS)

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ABS is a petroleum based plastic.  ABS is non-biodegradable.  ABS is a strong and durable material.  Therefore it is used in various products including protective head gear, golf club heads, carrying cases, enclosures for electronic assemblies, kitchen appliances, and toys including Lego bricks.  ABS is soluble in acetone, i.e., nail polish remover.

ABS is extruded at temperatures of 210-250°C.  Heating up ABS causes fumes to be released.  These fumes are usually tolerable but may cause irritation in people with chemical sensitivities.  These fumes include chemicals that are known to be carcinogenic.  Therefore, 3D printing using ABS should be performed with caution and in places with adequate ventilation.

Wikipedia: ABS

3D Printing For Beginners: What Material Should I Use For 3D Printing?

Protoparadigm: The Difference Between ABS and PLA for 3D Printing

Makerbot: ABS Filament

http://reprap.org/wiki/ABS

3D Printing 101: PLA or ABS?

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Fab@Home: The DIY 3D Printer from Cornell

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Fab@Home: The DIY 3D Printer from Cornell

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Fab@home was one of the first two open source do-it-yourself (DIY) 3D printer (the other open source DIY 3D printer was RepRap.) The Fab@Home 3D printer utilizes syringe tools that can make objects out of multiple materials.  The first version of Fab@Home print head had two syringes.  Later versions of Fab@Home 3D printers had more syringes going all the way up to eight syringes that could be used simultaneously.  Fab@Home 3D printers could be used with several materials including epoxy, silicone, food materials such as chocolate, cookie dough and cheese, among others.

The Fab@Home project was started by Hod Lipson and Evan Malone of the Cornell University Computational Synthesis Laboratory in 2006.  Before the release of open source 3D printers the 3D printer market was dominated by industrial 3D printers.  The goal of Fab@Home was to make 3D printers more popular and accessible for common people.  The project was continued until 2012.  The project was considered complete when the rate at which do-it-yourself 3D printers and consumer printers were being distributed exceeded the rate of industrial 3D printers.

http://www.fabathome.org

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fab@Home