Massachusetts

3D Printing News Alert( Lung tissue bioprinting)

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According to bioengineers Jordan Miller of Rice University and Kelly Stevens of the University of Washington (UW) and included 15 collaborators from Rice, UW, Duke University, Rowan University and Nervous System, a design firm in Somerville, Massachusetts, assistant professor Miller from bioengineering at Rice’s Brown School of engineering,” one of the biggest roadblocks to generating functional tissue replacements has been our inability to print the complex vasculature that can supply nutrients to densely populated tissues. Further, our organs actually contain independent vascular networks — like the airways and blood vessels of the lung or the bile ducts and blood vessels in the liver. These interpenetrating networks are physically and biochemically entangled, and the architecture itself is intimately related to tissue function. Ours is the first bioprinting technology that addresses the challenge of multi vascularization in a direct and comprehensive way.”

https://news.rice.edu/2019/05/02/organ-bioprinting-gets-a-breath-of-fresh-air-2/?utm_source=Hero&utm_medium=organprint&utm_campaign=Hero%20Links

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Desktop Metal has just been granted the patents

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Metal 3D Printing Patents Make it Easier to Remove Support Structures. Desktop Metal, is a Massachusetts based company that has developed office and mass production level metal 3D printers.
Desktop Metal has just been granted the patents for its proprietary Separable Supports technology.
According to Jonah Myerberg, Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of the company,

“As a company driven by invention, we are committed to both innovating and protecting our technology through strategic intellectual property achievements. The technological innovation in these patents enables users, for the first time, to print large metal parts with complex geometries that can be easily removed from their support structures by hand or to print metal objects with separable interlocking structures.”

“Traditional laser powder bed methods for metal additive manufacturing (AM) are restricted to single materials and are both difficult and costly to implement,” said Myerberg. “Desktop Metal has designed new approaches for metal AM that now allow multiple materials to be used during printing. This makes it possible to print support structures that do not bond to parts and consolidate during sintering with the part and, as a result, high dimensional accuracy is achieved, and support structures are easily removed by hand. We believe the benefit of this technology covered by the patents will enable substantially increased adoption of metal AM.” 🙂

https://www.desktopmetal.com

https://www.forbes.com