Makerbot

Princeton University, USA

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The Princeton Universities 3D Printer lab mainly used for hobby projects. In the begining they use PPPL and than they started using MakerBot. They use to make plastic objects.

Princeton’s students wanted to have Environmental friendly printer for all kinds of situations.

http://bp.pppl.gov/pub_report//2014/PPPL-4985.pdf

 

 

https://pppl.princeton.edu/3d_printer_lab

 

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BioBot: a Desktop 3D Printer for Living Tissue

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BioBot: a Desktop 3D Printer for Living Tissue

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Biobots, a Philadelphia based startup has developed a desktop 3D printer for printing biomaterials.  The 3D printer called BioBot 1 was demoed at TechCrunch Disrupt NY in May 2015.  Biobots was found the most innovative startup out of 48 startups at the SXSW Accelerator in Austin.

Biobot 1 uses a compressed air pneumatic system that allows it to precisely control the printing operation .  Biobots has developed biomaterial that is placed in the syringe along with cells for printing.  The biomaterial  hardens as it is extruded.  Biobot 1 uses visible blue light to cure the biomaterial.  Unlike UV light, visible blue light is not harmful to living tissue.  The technology can be used to 3D print living tissue such as cartilage, bone, or liver.  The technology can find valuable applications in clinical development of drug.

Biobots aims at bringing down the cost of bioprinting significantly.  Typical bioprinters cost in the range of hundred thousand dollars. Biobots managed to bring down the cost by an order of magnitude.  Biobot 1 is also designed for ease of use.  According to Danny Cabrera, cofounder of Biobots, “As soon as you get a BioBot, you can print something. What we’re doing is we’re saying anybody can do this. [It’s] this MakerBot of biology idea.”

 

http://www.biobots.io/

http://fortune.com/2015/07/13/biobot-the-makerbot-of-biology/

 

 

 

 

http://techcrunch.com/video/biobots-is-a-3d-printer-for-living-cells/518812512/

http://technical.ly/philly/2015/03/16/biobots-most-innovative-sxsw/

Carnegie Mellon University Researchers 3D Print Tissues Using MakerBot 3D Printers

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Carnegie Mellon University Researchers 3D Print Tissues Using MakerBot 3D Printers

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Human body can repair small tissue damages by itself.  However, human body has its limits and cannot fix several types of damages.  For example, human body is unable to fix several heart, problems, kidney problems, liver problems, and so on.  These problems are fixed by performing organ transplants.  Thousands of Americans are on waiting lists for various organ transplants.

Professor Adam Feinberg’s group at Carnegie Mellon is performing research that one day could make it unnecessary to transplant organs.  Instead, the required organs will be 3D printed.  Professor Feinberg’s group  is using MakerBot’s 3D printers for 3D printing tissues.

The technology can best be described in the words of Professor Feinberg, “The challenge with soft materials — think about something like Jello that we eat — is that they collapse under their own weight when 3-D printed in air.  So we developed a method of printing these soft materials inside a support bath material. Essentially, we print one gel inside of another gel, which allows us to accurately position the soft material as it’s being printed, layer-by-layer.”

One important aspect of this research is that it is based on use of off-the-shelf 3D printers and not conventional bioprinters.  These off-the-shelf 3D printers cost in the range of a thousand dollars which is much more affordable compared typical bioprinters that cost in the range of hundred thousand dollars.  Also the research group is using open source software and releasing their 3D printer designs under an open source license.

http://engineering.cmu.edu/files/images/press/2015/Fixing-Broken-Hearts-Infographic.jpg

http://www.makerbot.com/blog/2015/11/05/3d-printing-tissues-and-organs-with-makerbot

 

 

http://engineering.cmu.edu/media/feature/2015/10_23_feinberg_paper.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-34505242

3D Printing Materials: Poly Lactic Acid (PLA)

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3D Printing Materials: Poly Lactic Acid (PLA)

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Poly Lactic Acid or PLA is made from organic material, for example, cornstarch, tapioca, or sugarcane.  PLA is used in production of bags, food packaging, disposable utensils, plastic bags, and so on.  PLA is used as surgical implants such as anchors, rods, pins, or plates, since it.  If inserted in body, PLA breaks into harmless lactic acid within 6 months to a couple of years.  The slow degradation helps the body to slowly take over the role of the implanted structure as it recovers.

Since PLA is made from renewable resources, it is one of the most environment friendly material used for 3D printing.  PLA is extruded at a temperature of 160°C to 220°C.  Since PLA has a low melting temperature, parts made from PLA can warp under heated conditions.   When heated for 3D printing, PLA emits a sweet smell similar to corn.  These are not harmful fumes and therefore PLA can be used for 3D printing indoors.  PLA comes in most colors including translucent and glow in the dark. PLA cools slowly and therefore some 3D printers install a fan to cool down the 3D printed material.  When PLA cools down it is tough but rather brittle.  PLA has become a popular choice of material for 3D printing due to its environment friendliness and low toxicity.

Wikipedia: Polylactic acid

3D Printing For Beginners: What Material Should I Use For 3D Printing?

PLA Filament from Makerbot Store

Flashgamer: 3D printing with Color

 

 

http://reprap.org/wiki/PLA

http://3dfilamenta.com/blog/pla-filament-the-plastic-used-for-3d-printing/