How Moots uses 3D printing to build titanium bikes that last a lifetime

3D printing to build titanium bikes

Posted on Updated on

3D printing to build titanium bikes. According to The folks at Moots,” have been building gravel-focused bikes since 1981. In 1991, Moots went all-in on titanium frames and never looked back. Since then the methods for the building have evolved. They now include 3D-printed titanium parts, which Moots uses to push its frame design to new limits.”

From comments,
Simon Irvine
3 days ago
James Camden Engineering do the 3D Printing for Moots.

Christopher Wheeler
3 days ago (edited)
I love learning about small companies that are still significantly motivated by pride.

While their products will, by necessity, be more expensive, the experience of designing, constructing and owning something like that will almost certainly be more satisfying and meaningful, even if each of those steps takes longer to achieve.

The days of easy come, easy go, are ruining the planet and have already taken any sort of pride out of the process. I for one, congratulate Moots for doing their own work, and doing it with obvious care.

Hopefully, we can see more videos like this one from real manufacturers and not just business models that outsource. Thanks for the excellent video!

cerebellum
2 days ago
Anodizing explanation was slightly off, it’s not really about the shape of crystals. The different colours in this case are achieved by building up a very thin oxide layer. As light goes through the oxide layer and reflected by the material it gets bent slightly, just like when you look into water. Because the oxide layer is about the same thickness as the wavelengths of visible light, you get interference on certain wavelengths. Depending the thickness of the oxide layer, different wavelengths are affected by that interference so you get different colours.

Naturalhighz
3 days ago
Absolutely brilliant. would love nothing more than a costumized titanium bike! The fact that they’ve kept up with time and put disc brakes, more clearance for wider tyres is just fantastic. Can’t imagine a more enjoyable bike than those.

bdl 2
14 minutes ago
How long until we get a 3D printed Aero titanium Frame, I wonder…

How Moots uses 3D printing to build titanium bikes that last a lifetime

Advertisements