Heart

TRILUMINATE Pivotal Study for Abbott’s TriClip device

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According to Professor Georg Nickenig, lead investigator of the study and chair of Internal Medicine and Polyclinic II at the University of Bonn, Germany, presented findings. Data show a TR reduction of at least one grade in 87 percent of patients with symptomatic or greater TR and improvements in quality-of-life, “The TriClip is a version of the MitraClip used for transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) to resolve mitral regurgitation. A post hoc registry analysis of MitraClip use for TR has indicated TR reduction and improved clinical outcomes out to one year. Treatment for TR is currently limited to the use of diuretics and high-risk surgical procedures. Nickenig said minimally invasive catheter-based procedures (such as TriClip) may reduce TR with low procedural risk.”

 

TriClip Device For Tricuspid Regurgitation Effective at One Year in TRILUMINATE Study

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Sugar 3D Printer

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According to Rohit Bhargava professor of bioengineering at the University of Illinois,” he has created a new kind of 3D printer capable of producing complex shapes from sugar that can be used to grow biological tissues. The printer uses a process called free-form printing to create intricate structures that could not be made with traditional layer-by-layer 3D printing”.

https://news.illinois.edu

3D Printing — The World As I See It

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3D Printing — The World As I See It

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3D printing will have an immensely positive impact on society in the near future.

via 3D Printing — The World As I See It

Carnegie Mellon University Researchers 3D Print Tissues Using MakerBot 3D Printers

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Carnegie Mellon University Researchers 3D Print Tissues Using MakerBot 3D Printers

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Human body can repair small tissue damages by itself.  However, human body has its limits and cannot fix several types of damages.  For example, human body is unable to fix several heart, problems, kidney problems, liver problems, and so on.  These problems are fixed by performing organ transplants.  Thousands of Americans are on waiting lists for various organ transplants.

Professor Adam Feinberg’s group at Carnegie Mellon is performing research that one day could make it unnecessary to transplant organs.  Instead, the required organs will be 3D printed.  Professor Feinberg’s group  is using MakerBot’s 3D printers for 3D printing tissues.

The technology can best be described in the words of Professor Feinberg, “The challenge with soft materials — think about something like Jello that we eat — is that they collapse under their own weight when 3-D printed in air.  So we developed a method of printing these soft materials inside a support bath material. Essentially, we print one gel inside of another gel, which allows us to accurately position the soft material as it’s being printed, layer-by-layer.”

One important aspect of this research is that it is based on use of off-the-shelf 3D printers and not conventional bioprinters.  These off-the-shelf 3D printers cost in the range of a thousand dollars which is much more affordable compared typical bioprinters that cost in the range of hundred thousand dollars.  Also the research group is using open source software and releasing their 3D printer designs under an open source license.

http://engineering.cmu.edu/files/images/press/2015/Fixing-Broken-Hearts-Infographic.jpg

http://www.makerbot.com/blog/2015/11/05/3d-printing-tissues-and-organs-with-makerbot

 

 

http://engineering.cmu.edu/media/feature/2015/10_23_feinberg_paper.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-34505242