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Relativity Space to build the first rocket 3D Printing factory

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With backing from NASA, rocket startup Relativity Space is creating the first autonomous rocket factory. The company is planning to produce 95% of rocket components with 3D printing, and the first orbital launch is expected in late 2020.

 

This is a guest contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop

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Source: www.relativityspace.com

The new agreement will provide the California-based startup with exclusive access to NASA’s infrastructure and financial aid from the Mississippi Development Authority for building a large-scale highly automated 3D printing rocket factory. The company will lease a 20,000-square-meter building at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center for nine years. The test stands and all the necessary equipment on the site allow for convenient engine testing. The agreement provides an option to extend the lease for another 10 years. The company aims to create 200 jobs and invest $59 million in the state. In exchange, the state of Mississippi offers a reimbursement of expenses and a tax incentive package.

image2.jpgSource: www.relativityspace.com

The new factory will produce Relativity Space’s first 3D printed rocket – Terran 1. This vehicle can carry up to 2,756 lbs. into low Earth orbit. Both stages will be powered by 3D printed Aeon engines fueled by methane and liquid oxygen. The first stage will be powered by nine engines, stage two will be equipped with only one. The rocket is priced at $10 million per launch. It is expected that due to the use of the 3D printing technology the manufacturing cycle will not exceed 60 days. 

Although the company is planning to construct its own launch facility, the first rockets will be launched from Cape Canaveral. The launchpad and all the supporting infrastructure will be provided by the U.S. Air Force. The company was allowed to use Launch Complex (LC) 16, which was built for tests of Titan I and Titan II, and then Pershing I and Pershing II missiles. The last launch took place there in 1988. 

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Source: www.relativityspace.com

Most of the metal parts will be manufactured by Stargate, Relativity Space’s first 3D printer. The scalable system features multi-axis robotic arms with lasers. The machine uses metal wire feedstock as a printing material. In February 2019, Relativity Space was granted a machine learning 3D metal printing patent, issued for “real-time adaptive control of additive manufacturing processes using machine learning” (US20180341248A1).

“This agreement demonstrates again NASA’s commitment to work with our industry partners to expand commercial access to low Earth orbit. This helps NASA maintain focus on the ambitious Artemis program that will land the first female and the next male on the south pole of the Moon by 2024,” said Rick Gilbrech, director of  Stennis Space Center. “Relativity is a valuable member of the Stennis federal city and we look forward to building on our already successful partnership.”

The first orbital launch is expected in 2020. The company is planning to enter the commercial market in 2021.

 

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3D Printing latest news(Carbon’s fundraising now more than $680 million)

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Carbon’s fundraising now more than $680 million. According to Dr. Joseph DeSimone, Carbon’s CEO and Co-Founder, “With the Carbon Platform, powered by our Digital Light Synthesis™ technology, companies are finally breaking free of the constraints of traditional polymer manufacturing methods to make what’s next now and at speeds and volumes never before possible.
According to Greg Penner, Founder and General Partner at Madrone Capital Partners and Chairman of Walmart, “What impresses me about Carbon is their diversification across markets and industries. Through their partnerships with large-scale manufacturers in automotive, healthcare, and consumer goods, they are proving that, with their Digital Light Synthesis™ technology, additive manufacturing in larger scale production is becoming a reality across industry sectors. This is an inflection point for the company, and we’re proud to be able to contribute to Carbon’s future success.”

According to Jim Goetz, Partner at Sequoia Capital, “Carbon has cracked the code on 3D printing at scale, as evidenced by its impressive growth in implementation and products brought to market with companies such as Adidas, Ford, Lamborghini, and Riddell. They are truly delivering on their vision to provide the world’s first fully integrated digital manufacturing platform for high-volume production, and they are well on their way to transforming the 3D printing world.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2r7

https://www.carbon3d.com/news/

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2019-06-25/how-carbon-uses-3d-printing-to-transform-the-global-supply-chain-video

Carbon IPO Watch

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We all love 3D printing. Maybe we are still learning and exploring about 3D printing. We have enough knowledge and research on 3D printing.
At the beginning of 2014, we had very little resources. Now in 2019, we have so many 3D printing companies and universities research work.
We are using 3D printing in everyday life. We don’t know what is 3D printed stuff or not 3D print.
We have healthcare, related to 3D print we even don’t know.
We are learning about new technology day by day. More we read more we get an education.
It is been so many years. 3D printing companies are growing and blossoming:)

According to the Fox News,” An initial public offering (IPO) looks as if it could be approaching for Carbon, the Silicon Valley-based 3D printing unicorn that exploded onto the tech scene Opens a New Window. in 2015 and is probably best known for partnering with Adidas (NASDAQOTH: ADDYY) to produce running shoes with 3D-printed midsoles Opens a New Window.
Carbon’s co-founders were inspired to develop [DLS] by the robotic assassin T-1000 from the movie Terminator 2, which rises from a pool of liquid metal to assume the form of any person or object. Indeed, DLS “grows” polymer parts continuously from a pool of liquid resin by harnessing ultraviolet light and oxygen. The tech can be considered a close cousin of stereolithography, which 3D Systems invented”.
According to the Forbes and Carbon’s co-founder and CEO Joe DeSimone, “3-D Printing Unicorn Carbon, On Way To Expected IPO, Drops Resin Prices In Move CEO Calls seminal moment. It would help enable more widespread adoption of 3-D printing at scale. It’s not prototyping anymore, it’s production”.

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https://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/carbon-ipo-watch-is-the-3d-printing-unicorn-preparing-to-go-public

https://www.forbes.com/sites/amyfeldman/2018/11/12/3-d-printing-unicorn-carbon-on-way-to-expected-ipo-drops-resin-prices-in-move-ceo-calls-seminal/#3b57c8d8375d

3D printed Santa Cruz Bicycles

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According to some comments, “I knew he had reserve carbon wheels. Carbon trail bike…..meh. Santa Cruz is becoming the Lamborghini’s of the bicycle world. So they literally made him a custom monocoque carbon frame and fork. Amazing Bike!!!😆😂😂.Carbon.carbon. Carbon! Best bike engineering in the world. Santa Cruz Bicycles prototypes rugged, lightweight bike with AM.
Full carbon dream bike with 24-inch Reserve carbon wheels.
Santa Cruz Bicycles relied on additive manufacturing to make a tough, lightweight frame for its new ‘Danny bike’. Using high-performance thermoplastics, they cut four pounds from the weight and went from design to rideable prototype within weeks”.
According to Nic McCrae, composites engineer at Santa Cruz, “Once we had the latex bladders nailed, we needed to understand how precise we could get with layup and materials in order to maximize the new technique. Almost every carbon fiber product is made with a wide variety of fiber materials, varying in grades and attributes. Our production bikes are strong as hell, and we feel we have a good handle on our toolbox of materials, but the goal with Danny [MacAskill]’s bike was to push that understanding forward, and take advantage of emerging materials technology”.

https://stratasys.hubs.vidyard.com/watch/mjAWVboE9udhtM212jUZze

Minimize and manage plastic waste with 3D printing

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Minimize and manage plastic waste with 3D printing.
We can control and minimize plastic use because plastics provide health, safety for something useful. The plastic has convenience and benefits. If we use plastic carefully and recycle in a proper manner. It will be beneficial for so many aspects.

We can use 3D printing to save humanity. But, most important thing is that plastic waste does not belong in our environment.
What we should do to protect more harm.
Toronto-based biotechnology startup, Genecis is developing a synthetic biology platform to convert organic waste into premium chemicals and materials.
According to Marcelo Lu, President of BASF Canada, BASF seeks to work with innovative partners to strategically solve today’s global challenges,” We are proud to support a Canadian startup company which is providing a sustainable solution for organic waste. PHBVs, a high-quality biodegradable plastic that is used to make thermo-resistant packaging, compostable coffee pods, and 3D printing filaments”.
BASF accelerates its outreach towards technologies like artificial intelligence, internet of things and robotics. BASF is based, San Francisco, California, and Ludwigshafen, Germany.
According to Markus Solibieda, Managing Director at BASF Venture Capital,“ Alchemist has built a strong reputation for attracting the best in the digital ecosystem. We are thrilled to officially join Alchemist as a Limited Partner. Digitalization represents unprecedented opportunities to create value for our customers and develop new business models. By investing in a digitally-focused fund, we promote innovations at the intersection of chemicals and technologies like artificial intelligence, internet of things and robotics”,

https://www.basf.com/us/en.html

Carbon 3D print with Diamond technology

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Carbon 3D is really about to change the game with “Diamond technology,” the collaboration creates lattice design pads of resin that are custom built to a player’s dimensions and position. This is advanced manufacturing. The designs and manufactures to make protective gear for football and other games.
According to Carbon co-founder and CEO Joseph DeSimone “We scan heads, and then you’ve got the shell of the helmet. The gap between the head and the shell is now customized. That space is now custom to everybody, and we fill that space with a lattice that controls the impact of the sport. It allows you to get really great performance as you control the impact that the players see.”

Prevent defects in metal 3D-printed parts

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Prevent defects in metal 3D-printed parts. Using this technology could have been benefited to build high rise buildings in San Francisco California.

According to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, “High-speed images of a common laser-based metal 3D printing process, coupled with newly updated computer models, have revealed the mechanisms behind material redistribution, a phenomenon that leads to defects in printed metal parts”.

https://www.llnl.gov/news/lab-report

 

https://www.llnl.gov/news/llnl-explores-machine-learning-prevent-defects-metal-3d-printed-parts-real-time

 

 

Hierarchical 3-D Printing of Nano porous Gold

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According to Chris Spadaccini the director of LLNL’s Center for Engineered Materials and Manufacturing, “There are a whole lot of scientific and engineering challenges left, but it could have the significant impact, scaling up should be easier with small-scale reactors because you can parallelize. You could have an array of small 3-D reactors together instead of one large vessel enabling you to control the chemical reaction process more effectively. The Monolithic nanoporous metals, derived from dealloying, have a unique bicontinuous solid/void structure that provides both large surface area and high electrical conductivity, making them ideal candidates for various energy applications”.

 

https://www.ecnmag.com/news/2018/09/hierarchical-3-d-printing-nanoporous-gold-could-revolutionize-electrochemical-reactor-design

https://www.llnl.gov/news/lab