3D bioprinting

3D bioprinting of tissues and organs

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According to Yehiel Tal, the Chief Executive Officer of CollPlant, “This fund raising is intended to support the advancement of our pipeline in the fields of medical aesthetics and 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. We are now focused on facilitating our development programs of dermal fillers and regenerative breast implants. Our collaboration with United Therapeutics, which is using our BioInk technology for 3D printing lungs, is progressing, and we continue to expand our business collaborations with large international healthcare companies that seek to implement our revolutionary regenerative medicine technology. We are very pleased to have entered into this transaction with Mr. Sagi and the other investors.”

 

CollPlant Biotechnologies Raising $5.5 Million

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First living tissue 3D printed in space aboard the International Space Station

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First living tissue 3D printed in space aboard the International Space StationFirst living tissue 3D printed in space aboard the International Space Station

This is a guest post contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop.

First living tissue 3D printed in space aboard the International Space Station
This is a guest post contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop.

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The Top 3D Expo Conference which took place in Moscow on April 19 demonstrated a revolutionary bioprinter that was previously sent to the International Space Station (ISS) to manufacture living tissues and organ under zero gravity. Yusef Khesuani, the managing partner and co-founder of the 3D Bioprinting Solutions Company, presented and told many interesting facts about their brainchild.

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A 3D bioprinter named Organ.Aut was transported to the ISS on December 3, 2018, where it was used to carry out several biomedical experiments in orbit.

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Application in medicine

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Using this 3D bioprinter, Oleg Kononenko, a Russian astronaut, successfully manufactured several types of living tissue, namely, the cartilage tissue of a human and the thyroid of a mouse.

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The results of these experiments with 3D-printing were 12 biological samples which then were sent to the Russian company 3D Bioprinting Solutions, responsible for conducting further research.

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3D printing in zero gravity state empowers modern science to create tissues and organs for transplantation while helping to avoid the limitations of terrestrial gravitation and test new methods of printing complicated kinds of tissue from living cells.

In autumn 2019, it is planned to send to orbit special synthetic ceramic materials, which will be utilized to fabricate implants with the help of 3D printing technologies. Such implants will facilitate the regeneration of bone tissue in patients with serious injuries.

Application in foodstuff manufacturing

Apart from benefiting science and medicine, bioprinting can go much further and find application in food production, too. 3D Bioprinting Solutions together with foreign partners, bio-technological startups from different countries, are already working in this direction.

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They are studying the cultivation of artificial beef, blue tuna, and salmon from living cells. If these experiments succeed, in the measurable future, we will be able to produce cruelty-free, eco-friendly, technological-powered and, most important, inexpensive meat on a wholesale scale! The company received samples from its partners and now is testing them in terms of meeting technical requirements necessary for sending these samples to the ISS with a 3D printer onboard.

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Organ.Aut

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Organ.Aut is a bioprinter designed specifically to work with biological tissue (such as living cells in nutrient liquid) in space.

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This 3D bioprinter manages printing materials using magnet fields in order to form their structures, not layer by layer as is normally the case with FDM solutions, but from all the sides simultaneously.

In addition to the 3D bioprinter for space, the company also produces biological 3D printers which can be used on Earth.

FABION 2

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FABION 2 is an updated version of the company’s previous model – a basic bioprinter FABION able to print biological tissues using bio-inks and hydrogels of different consistencies and compositions. FABION 2 ensures high cell density and high level of synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins within spheroids, which provides for the creation of highly viable and fully functional tissue constructs.

At the Conference

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At the exhibition conference, visitors could see Organ.Aut and other cutting-edge equipment for 3D printing and scanning as well as listen to interesting reports from the field experts.

For instance, the head of 3D Bioprinting Solutions not only demonstrated the bioprinter and explained in simple words the principle of its work, but also gave a talk on the topic: “3D-bioprinting: its past, present, future”, under which, he speculated on the development of bioprinting in the world – how it was invented, its current situation, and prospects.

3D Printer helps man walk

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According to Dr. Mica Murdoch the Foot and Ankle Clinic,” 3D Printer helps man walk. Shaka Robinson learned to live with pain after an accident 20 years ago. I fell out of a car and separated my foot from my tibia.
The nice thing is, two years ago your option would have been to go in and tear out that bone and pack this whole thing of just a bone graft and fuse up your whole rear foot and ankle and none of it would have ever moved again”.

Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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Disabled Wisconsin Duck walks with 3D Printed Feet

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A duck named Phillip lost his feet to frostbite in Wisconsin.  He was found by a teacher Vicki Rabe-Harrison who first considered euthanizing him considering his condition.  Instead, she contacted Jason Jischke, a middle school teacher who had a 3D printer in his class.  Jason asked her not to put Phillip down.  Jason worked with his students to develop feet for Phillip.  After multiple attempts, finally they managed to 3D print feet that fit Phillip.  Phillip struggled initially with the prosthetic feet but figured out fast how to use them.  He got a second life thanks to his 3D printed feet.  Phillip now lives in Wisconsin’s Autumn Farm Sanctuary, near Lake Michigan with other duck friends.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/phillip-duck-3d-printed-feet-disabled-wisconsin-autumn-farm-animal-sanctuary-a6992656.html

 

http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2016/04/wisconsin_duck_named_phillip_g.html

 

 

3D Printing Blood Vessel Networks

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3-D printers can assemble raw materials into very complex products. Researchers had previously fabricated a single blood vessel, which amounted to no more than a long and slender tube. The next hurdle is to create complex, branching networks of blood vessels.

A team of engineers led by Dr. Shaochen Chen of the University of California, San Diego, aimed to improve on current 3-D printers to better engineer complex tissues like blood vessel networks. Their research was supported by NIH’s National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Results were published online in advance of the April 2017 issue of Biomaterials.

“Almost all tissues and organs need blood vessels to survive and work properly. This is a big bottleneck in making organ transplants, which are in high demand but in short supply,” says Chen. “3-D bioprinting organs can help bridge this gap, and our lab has taken a big step toward that goal.”

The results show that a complex tissue resembling blood vessels can be formed using a 3-D printer. The ultimate challenge for this research team is to engineer heart tissue with a complex network of blood vessels. Such tissues might be used to replace damaged heart muscle or for drug testing. 🙂

https://ucsd.edu.

3D Printing Conference & Expo( Innovation, Modelling, Application & Implementation)

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3D Printing Conference & Expo( Innovation, Modelling, Application & Implementation)

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3D Printing Conference is based on Medical related 3D printing, Engineering,  3D Imaging and future prospects.

The main theme of this conference is, “Novelties in Additive Manufacturing and Bioprinting”.

3D Printing Conference is based on Medical related 3D printing, Engineering, 3D Imaging and future prospects.

3D bio printing utilizes the layer-by-layer method to create tissue-like structures which get utilized in medical and tissue engineering fields. By the use of 3D printing, we can produce exoskeletons, windpipes, jawbone, bones, ears, blood vessels, vascular networks, tissues, eye-glasses, cell cultures, stem cells, and organs. Currently, bio printing can be used to print tissues and organs to help research of Drug discovery. In addition, it has begun the printing of scaffolds. These scaffolds can be used to regenerate joints and ligaments.

They have some FREE passes. If you are in area, or planing to visit.:)

Las Vegas, Nevada, USA

3D Printing workshop

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3D Printing workshop


Pittsburg,PA

David L. Lawrence Convention Center.

3D printing in hospitals, Bio printing and medical devices.

May 8  Monay,  8 to 10 a.m.

http://rapid3devent.com/event-features/workshops/

Microfluids and 3D Printing

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Microfluids and 3D Printing


NC State’s enthusiasts are doing lot of work for Microfluids. They found the liquid metal can be transform into 3d printed product.

This is fast and simple technique for making human body parts or metal objects.

According to Sidra Waheed, Joan M. Cabot, Niall P. Macdonald, Trevor Lewis,
3D printing has the potential to significantly change the field of microfluidics. The ability to fabricate a complete microfluidic device in a single step from a computer model has obvious attractions.
http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2016/lc/c6lc00284f?page=search

Student Straigtens His Own Teeth by 3D Printing His Braces

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Student Straigtens His Own Teeth by 3D Printing His Braces


Amos Dudley, an intern at NJIT used 3D Printer to make his clear braces.  Usually getting work done to straighten your teeth can be quite expensive.  Amos managed to straighten his teeth in $60.

Due to his interesting story, Formlabs, a Massachusetts based company that manufactures 3D  printers offered him a job.  Formlabs was founded in 2011 by Maxim Lobovsky, Natan Linder, and David Cranor of MIT.

According to Lobovsky, founder of Formlabs, “Amos’s work pushes the limits of 3D printing applications.  That kind of inventiveness is exactly what our customers hope to achieve with our products.”

http://www.njit.edu/features/student/amos-job.php

https://formlabs.com/

 

Vader Systems create 3-D Printer For Printing with Liquid Metal

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3-D printing liquid metal with Vader Systems



University of Buffalo student Zack Vader has created a machine that prints three-dimensional objects using liquid metal.

According to Professor Edward P. Furlani  of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Electrical Engineering departments of University at Buffalo, Vader’s process uses a magnetic field to manipulate conductive fluids.  The magnetic field is used to create pressure for squeezing the liquid out of an ejector nozzle.

According to Furlani “It’s a transformative technology.  It’s very exciting interdisciplinary engineering. I think its application base will continue to broaden and expand for the foreseeable future.”

According to Chi Zhou, Assistant Professor at University of Buffalo, “I can see at this stage that it can complement traditional metal printing, but later, maybe 10 years later, it can dominate the metal printing market because it can print better quality, cheaper and faster.”

Vader’s 3-D printer can be used in future for making custom knee and hip replacements.

www.buffalo.edu
BUFFALO, N.Y. — A father and son team in the START-UP NY program have invented a liquid metal printing machine that could represent a significant transformation in manufacturing. A breakthrough idea five years ago by former University at Buffalo student Zack Vader, then 19, has created a machine that prints three-dimensional objects using liquid metal.