Johnston Uses 3D Printing to Meet Needs of Alzheimer’s Center Residents

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The chancellor of UAFS College of Applied Science and Technology’s 3D printing lab Dr. Terisa Riley and Methodist Village CEO Melissa Curry,” develop an initial set of 3D-printed nuts and bolts to aid residents’ cognitive stimulation.
The faculty at UAFS are deeply skilled, both as educators and as experts in their fields. It’s exciting to see our mission as a comprehensive regional institution fulfilled in their commitment to serving the citizens of the River Valley through innovative partnerships like these. When planning for our Alzheimer’s Special Care Community, we knew it was important to have the right sensory stimulation. They also mention We ordered life-like robotic cats and dogs for allergen-free pet therapy and installed interactive art throughout the halls.”

https://uafs.edu.

https://news.uafs.edu/news/5146

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The 3D-Printed architectural pastry

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According to

“Dinara Kasko creates highly artistic, edible cakes using 3D printers. In her talk, Dinara will tell us how she shifted from architecture to the baking industry! Dinara Kasko describes herself as an architectural pastry chef coming from Ukraine. She is creating highly artistic, edible cakes through the use of 3D printers. In her TEDx Talk, Dinara will tell her story about how she has shifted from architecture to the baking industry resulting in a combination of both fields.

Moreover, her professional career and the choices she made show that due to the emergence of new technologies people get the possibility to tap into completely new fields either in their personal life or in their work life. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community.”

According to Ukrainian pastry chef Dinara Kasko (TedX talk) architectural pastry chef, Dmitri Shurygin, Shurygin Jonquils Café & Bakery, “It’s very interesting in terms of texture and flavor profile. What can be more beautiful than a cake?
Each dessert has up to six layers. The Lime Basil, for example, has lime jelly, marshmallow cream, cheese mousse, white sponge and coconut.”

 

BostInno Tries: The 3D-Printed Desserts That Are Reinventing Baking

Materialise’s additive manufacturing webinar(3D Printing upcoming Events, Conferences)

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3D Printing upcoming Events, Conferences

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tD

According to Materialise, “you will discover how Streamics, as an AM production management and control system, enables service providers and bureaus as well as end-part manufacturers to get the most out of the potential that 3D printing has to offer.”

7 AUG 2019

ONLINE, BELGIUM

https://www.materialise.com/en/events/software/how-efficiently-manage-am-activities-with-streamics

https://www.materialise.com

Physna: Compare thousands of 3D models in seconds

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Physna: Compare thousands of 3D models in seconds,
According to Physna’s CEO Paul Powers and Glenn Warner, “Through revolutionary artificial intelligence, Physna uses advanced algorithms to dissect and analyze 3D objects in the blink of an eye.
Many companies have collectively spent billions of dollars on this problem. The reason that Physna is the first to actually fix it is that we used a fundamentally different type of technology.
Compare your IP with others in seconds, ensuring that you’re using the correct models and nobody else is using your designs. Promptly determine if a 3D object matches your standards, allowing you to get to market quicker. Find any 3D object in seconds, old or new, helping to keep department and operation costs to a minimum. Compare any two models instantly and see exactly how much they match with total accuracy and reliability. We call those facets. Everything in nature can be broken down into triangles. We basically analyze the relationship of facets to each other and to the surrounding environment.”

https://www.physna.com/

https://www.wcpo.com/news/insider/don-t-phear-the-phunny-name-physna-could-soon-be-a-1-billion-software-company

https://www.drivecapital.com/index?success=true

https://www.drivecapital.com/

Physna raises $6.9 million to develop “Google of 3D models”

Prellis Biologics has raised $8.7M

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According to Dr. Alex Morgan, Principal at Khosla Ventures and Dr. Melanie Matheu, Prellis Biologics’ co-founder and CEO, “Regenerative medicine has made enormous leaps in recent decades. However, to create complete organs, we need to build higher-order structures like the vascular system. Prellis’ optical technology provides the scaffolding necessary to engineer these larger masses of tissues. With our investment in Prellis, we’re supporting an initiative that will ultimately produce a functioning lobe of the lung, or even a kidney, to be used in addressing an enormous unmet global need.

The human tissue engineering is the ability to build complex tissues with working vascular systems. The future of regenerative medicine revolves around harnessing the power of our own cells as therapeutics and building the tissues to keep them alive. Khosla Ventures is the perfect investor to support our merging of deep tech and cutting-edge regenerative medicine. With this technology in hand, we can begin to ask questions about real 3D cell biology that have never been asked before.”

https://www.prellisbio.com/

https://www.eurekalert.org/

Legal issues in additive manufacturing.

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Legal issues in additive manufacturing.
According to Professor of Engineering Design and Manufacturing and director of the AMD program Timothy W. Simpson, Paul Morrow “Additive manufacturing is disrupting product design and how we manufacture parts. It’s also disrupting how we protect our intellectual property. Most engineers are not prepared to think about the impact this will have on how their company will deliver new products and services with AM.”
According to Christopher Higgins, partner and co-leader of the 3D Printing Group at Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP,” As an engineer, having an understanding of legal issues that may arise in additive manufacturing can make you an invaluable asset to a company. It is a skill set that most engineers do not have when exiting school, which makes this course a unique opportunity at Penn State.”
According to Brenna McCornac, a student currently enrolled in the course and an additive manufacturing engineer at Cumberland Additive, “As a working engineer, I feel that this is a valuable knowledge base to have. I don’t believe that many engineers have the opportunity to learn a lot about the law, especially within their specific field. Those of us participating in this class will be uniquely equipped to work effectively in a corporate setting or start their own business, having a good basis of legal knowledge pertaining to additive manufacturing.”

https://news.psu.edu/story/581605/2019/07/24/academics/first-its-kind-graduate-course-tackles-legal-issues-additive

3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

https://www.psu.edu/feature/2018/06/18/3d-printing-purpose

Sand 3D Printer before and now

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According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
Category
7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

https://www.sculpteo.com/blog/2019/07/17/is-a-sand-3d-printer-the-future-of-additive-manufacturing/?

3D-printing a lunar base

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According to European Space Agency, ESA, “Could astronauts one day be printing rather than building a base on the Moon? In 2013 ESA, working with industrial partners, proved that 3D printing using lunar material was feasible in principle. Since then, work continues to investigate the technique. The shielding against radiation provided by a 3D-printed block of simulated lunar regolith was measured, providing important inputs for next-stage designs.”
According to ESA(Now),” astronaut Luca Parmitano has arrived on the International Space Station following a six-hour flight in the Russian Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft alongside NASA astronaut Drew Morgan and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov.”

From comments,

4 years ago

This is all good except the “3d printing material” should be the regolith itself melted by focused solar energy. This way the printers could print an inexhaustible™ supply of infrastructure from roads to sinks to rail-launch systems and so on. You would want one specialized printer for printing the things that can’t be made from regolith. (control circuits, actuators, etc.)

I really hope NASA and ESA team up to explore the rest of our solar system and beyond.

3Years ago
Nice, would be able to put an observatory on the moon and make it a refuel station for further travel and a back up for rescue if needed also can make a shipbuilding/repair station safer launches don’t have to fight the gravity and atmosphere burn up, can also make a relay station put a full array of satellites on the moon.
It would be simpler and cheaper to ship high explosives to the moon and use them to excavate a cylindrical chamber into the side of a large crater (like building a tunnel on earth) and then seal off the end, pressurize, and occupy. Much roomier, more protection from radiation and meteor impacts. This 3-D printer idea is dull and uninspiring.
This is great news potentially. I hope one day we can live in space or the moon.

Now
2019: HASSEL wants to print a 3D mars base.

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/technology-48845755/why-3d-printing-could-be-key-to-a-moon-base

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p07h703b

https://www.esa.int/ESA

http://lucaparmitano.esa.int/

The Lightyear One is 3D printed

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More than 55 interior parts for the Lightyear One are 3D printed.
According to Lex Hoefsloot, CEO of Lightyear announces and Robert Llewellyn, ” gets an exclusive first look at the Lightyear One hyper-efficient luxury sedan, a partially solar-powered electric car. And gets to experience it as one of the first passengers!

When Solar Team Eindhoven won the world solar challenge in Australia driving a 4 seater 100% solar-powered car over 3,000 kilometers, no one would have believed that a handful of years later they could come up with this.
Lightyear One. A spacious hyper-efficient partially solar-powered electric car.
We know the future is electric, could it be solar electric.”

 

 

 

 

https://lightyear.one/

https://www.fabbaloo.com/