Understanding Additive Manufacturing

3D printed “Star Trek Enterprise”

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According to Glenn and T’Pol, who also serves as the University of Houston-Victoria’s provost and vice president of academic affairs, received degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland at College Park and Johns Hopkins University, “The startup world’s 3D printing craze comes to Victoria. A glass of cold water materializes at a simple command from T’Pol, a Vulcan who serves on the spaceship Enterprise, in a clip from the early 2000s series “Star Trek Enterprise.”
I saw a similar device on a Tarkalean vessel,” It was capable of replicating almost any inanimate object.
If we had one of these in engineering, we could make all the spare parts we need notes Trip Tucker, another character in the series.”

The University of Houston

The startup world’s 3D printing craze comes to Victoria

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3D printed liquid silicone rubber

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According to German RepRap, “create future-oriented technologies and implement them in the design and production of our 3D printers. Since 2010 we have been developing our X-Series 3D Printers based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technology. The special feature of all printers is the Open Source Platform, which makes it possible to use a variety of materials for printing. New consumables are constantly being tested and added to our product range. The Liquid Additive Manufacturing (LAM) process, liquids such as silicone rubber can also be processed.”

 

DOW CHEMICAL EVOLV3D

German RepRap

 

3D printed Terran 1

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According to Relativity Space is a private American aerospace manufacturer company headquartered in Los Angeles, California, “Relativity Space was founded on the idea that Blue Origin and SpaceX were not doing enough to use 3D printing as part of rocket manufacturing. Relativity plans to 3D print an entire launch vehicle they call Terran 1. The extensive use of 3D printing has allowed the company to iterate designs quickly, use less tooling and human labor. In March 2018, Relativity Space signed a 20-year lease at the John C. Stennis Space Center, a NASA rocket testing facility, to test engine components and eventually test full-scale Aeon 1 rocket engines.
The company says it will launch its first rocket named Terran 1 from the site in 2020. Relativity plans to start commercial launch service by early 2021.”

Relativity Space

Relativity, a company 3D printing entire rockets, raises $140 million from venture firms Bond, Tribe

RAW MATERIAL TO FLIGHT

Achieve true 3D printing with non planar slicing

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According to Teaching Tech,” This is the most interesting thing I’ve done with my 3D printer in some time. Instead of printing in a series of 2D planes stacked up to form a 3D shape (2.5D), this non planar technique creates geometry with true 3D tool paths that can eliminate the steps often seen on shallow surfaces. Based on the amazing Masters Thesis of Daniel Ahlers and the University of Hamburg, this development can be tried yourself if you are willing to put in some time to setting it up.”

From comments,
Pinned by Teaching Tech
Teaching Tech
1 day ago
Hi everyone, some updates:
– A bunch of people pointed out that Windows 10 now has an embedded Linux environment. I installed this and went through the process again. I had a couple of errors and had to manually install missing cpan libraries via the command line. Slic3r did successfully compiled, but only runs via command line rather than with a graphical user interface as seen in this video. I’m sure there’s a way to add even more modules to get the GUI working, but it’s beyond my knowledge.
– Some people also mentioned setting up a dual boot configuration. This is another great suggestion but I need to have my Windows PC on at all times to keep my video production going, so not suitable for me.
– There have been some viewers pointing me towards ‘air brush’ nozzles. I’ve ordered a set, they look ideal for this technique.

falchulk
1 day ago
Windows subsystem for Linux 2.0 is much better then 1.0. Should be in the windows 10 1909 release.

grandaspanna
1 day ago
I have this working with WSL under Windows 10 and have used VcXsrv as the Xserver. It also allows pretty easy access between filesystems for loading STLs and writing back the gcode.

Doug Moody
1 day ago
@grandaspanna Yes. Most people with 3D printers know about gcode and STLs. They know how to calibrate their printers and make it print. But the software is somewhat mysterious, as are the effects one little change to a parameter in the slicer.
But what I think would help the most is a simple, already compiled executable program that would run and turn a traditional printer into a “true” 3D printer, using the methods discussed in this video.
I never even thought that my printer was a “2-1/2 D” printer until I watched this video. But now it makes so much more sense to do it this way. In fact, it makes sense to go one step further and make printers with five axes, so that the print nozzle is always perpendicular to the extrusion. When we get to that point, then we can start work on finer nozzles and plastic that extrudes with more granularity.
I do believe that the “big boys” who are printing airplane parts on demand have the right idea but that hasn’t filtered down to the hobbyists like me yet.

Gonun
2 days ago
This is awesome. No idea why I’m watching this as I don’t have a 3D printer, but it’s awesome.

Tina Yoga
2 days ago
I had recently been thinking of this kind of technique. I had thought that this technique would be more easily implemented with a delta based 3D printer. So that the print head could be tilted.

Gerhard Wilkens
1 day ago
you cant tilt the nozzle on a delta. the nozzle will always be parallel to the printbed

Tim Milgart
1 day ago
@Gerhard Wilkens Yes, but it would be logically more easily to do it on a delta based 3d printer. (As I see it, but i’m only a engineer, so everything can be done in my optic).

Filamax
1 day ago
it is very much doable, but is highly dependent on the Delta Design, my current delta prototype will actually do this, once i get the new board in, and some Titan Extruder spares. Cause the hot end hangs below the effector plate, with the magnetic arms on my printer giving a good range of movement the code can be adjusted to tilt the head. But it depends if slic3r can be adjusted to generate G-Code like this

Arek R.
2 days ago
That’s cool, but too much difficult work on software side.
I think it could really take of if CURA would make experimantal mode with it.
Then people would just need to remove the fan shroud, on stock Ender 3 that’s actually easy,

Žan Pekošak
2 days ago
This looks amazing! I will have to try it out very soon. Clean the Z screw and modify the CR10S hotend to have a part cooling fan and a decent head cooling fan…will see what I can do and if I manage it I will share it on Thingiverse.

Xander Vice
2 days ago
I mentioned this on the other video, but the next logical steps for non-planar are hot ends that have steeper angles, taller height to width ratio. Basically, with a steeper angled nozzle, it could fit into tighter curves. This also needs an entirely different cooling system, though, but that shouldn’t be too difficult to develop.
Non-planar also nicely extends into 5axis printing, which should be the next step of developments for the future of FDM.

 

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A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

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A 3D-printed transparent skull implant.
According to Suhasa Kodandaramaiah, Ph.D., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Benjamin Mayhugh Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Science and Engineering “What we are trying to do is to see if we can visualize and interact with large parts of the mouse brain surface, called the cortex, over long periods of time. This will give us new information about how the human brain works. This technology allows us to see most of the cortex in action with unprecedented control and precision while stimulating certain parts of the brain.”

According to Kodandaramaiah and Ebner, the research team was led by fourth-year mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Leila Ghanbari. The research team included several post-doctoral associates, graduate students and undergraduate students including Russell E. Carter (neuroscience), Matthew L. Rynes (biomedical engineering), Judith Dominguez (mechanical engineering), Gang Chen (neuroscience), Anant Naik (biomedical engineering), Jia Hu (biomedical engineering), Lenora Haltom (mechanical engineering), Nahom Mossazghi (neuroscience), Madelyn M. Gray (neuroscience) and Sarah L. West (neuroscience). The team also included partners at the University of Wisconsin including researcher Kevin W. Eliceiri and graduate student Md Abdul Kader Sagar, “This new device allows us to look at the brain activity at the smallest level zooming in on specific neurons while getting a big-picture view of a large part of the brain surface over time. Developing the device and showing that it works is just the beginning of what we will be able to do to advance brain research.”

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

University of Minnesota block M and wordmark

Research Brief: 3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain

Transparent 3D-Printed Skull Implant Opens New Window for Brain Researchers

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?
Are Likely to Increase in 2020.
According to ETFs consumers initially saw 3D printers as a “factory in every home, but they soon came to realize that the items they produced weren’t functional. As the hype fizzled out, new fears emerged in the manufacturing segment, and some companies using 3D printers saw year-over-year declines in their revenue. The rise and fall of additive manufacturing took place over a few short years, but that wasn’t the end of the story.”

According to TriLine“The share of renewables in meeting global energy demand is expected to grow by one-fifth in the next five years to reach 12.4% in 20232. RENW aims to offer long-term exposure to the growing future of energy,”

Additive manufacturing is on an upward trajectory as of late. This resurgence is due to the fact that the list of possible 3D-printable materials has more than doubled in the last five years.”

According to Dean Franks, the head of global sales at the additive manufacturing company, Autodesk, “believes that consumer products, industrial machinery, automotive and tooling applications are the growth opportunities for additive manufacturing. He believes that these industries will start to grow as the more established aerospace, medical and dental markets continue to grow.”
According to Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer at EOS, “predicts that 3D printing within healthcare will flourish because there is an increase in demand for personalized healthcare, treatments, and medical devices.”
According to the Morningstar North America Renewable Energy Index, which is designed, “to provide exposure to companies that operate across the full renewable energy supply chain, including renewable energy innovators, suppliers, adopters, and end-users.”
According to TriLine Index Solutions, the index and ETF development arm of Boone Pickens Capital Fund Advisors.”

Total 3D-Printing Index

The 3D Printing ETF Can Make A Comeback

Why Investments in Additive Manufacturing Are Likely to Increase in 2020

Jabil’s plan for $42M medical 3D printing with 24 percent core EPS growth

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According to St. Petersburg-based Jabil (NYSE: JBL),” is set to make a $42 million investment in Albuquerque, New Mexico for technology and equipment as it makes the Duke City its “center of excellence” for 3D printing, officials announced on Aug. 15. The company said it plans to hire 120 employees in the next five years.”
According to New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said in a statement “We have all the talent in the world right here in New Mexico, and when we build the infrastructure for a 21st-century economy, we will see more young adults stay here and more homegrown talent return here.”
According to CEO Mark Mondello, “I’m extremely pleased with our third-quarter performance, highlighted by solid operational excellence and strong financial results. The team delivered 20 basis points of core margin expansion on double-digit revenue growth, culminating in an impressive 24 percent core EPS growth, year-over-year. Our strong year-to-date results validate that our diversification strategy has firmly taken hold.”

Delivering insoles in 1/2 the time, at a fraction of the cost.

3D Printing Breaking Through the Barriers in Manufacturability

JABIL

Medical Device Mechatronics

Jabil Unveils Plans for $42M Medical 3D Printing Center of Excellence

Jabil unveils plans for $42M medical 3D printing center of excellence

Jabil: Florida manufacturing giant announces plans to invest $42M, create 100+ jobs in New Mexico

Florida manufacturing giant announces plans to invest $42M, create 100+ jobs in New Mexico

What kind of Problems with LCD Resin 3D Printers. Different ways to fix it? Safety features.

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What is your comment?

Please read safety things before using anything –
It is hazardous and it may give you an allergic reaction that you really don’t want (been there still got the skin problem) but it’s not toxic or sometimes it can be. Respiratory Irritation
Breathing highly concentrated epoxy vapor can irritate the respiratory system and cause sensitization. Serious health problems can result from sanding epoxy before it is fully cured. When you inhale these dust particles, they become trapped in the mucous lining of your respiratory system. Because it can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation. And dust from polyurethane resin is highly toxic.
The pure epoxy resins are considered as non-toxic, the risk of damage caused by ingestion of epoxy resin can be considered as very small. Most curing agents in use today have certain toxicity. Inhalation of epoxy resins causes no problems as they are not volatile.
The difference is that SLA works by flashing a laser — a tiny dot of concentrated light — across a given area to harden it and create a layer. In contrast, DLP machines cure all areas of a layer simultaneously, by projecting light onto the resin in the shape of that layer.
We can use liquid resin to produce 3D prints. Since we are dealing with a liquid material, an additional support structure is necessary for overhanging parts and cavities. The average 3D printer material cost for standard SLA resins is approximately $50 per liter. That means entry-level, cheap resins may even be under $50. MakerJuice offers a standard resin for SLA 3D printing, which costs $58 per liter.
Many resins are actually quite toxic, and we wrote on this some time ago. … However, remember that some resins ARE safe, it’s just that many are not – and they should be treated appropriately. The second issue with resin 3D printing is curing, the process that makes the resin solid.

Comments from video,
Luis Rios
1 day ago
The LCD screen is a consumable item and it is not covered by the warranty on most manufacturers. They are not meant to last forever although I have found that they are very sensitive. You need to strain the resin after every print as any dried resin that is left in the vat will damage the pixels when the next print starts.
Luis Rios
22 hours ago
@ualdayan I have six resin printers and have been through the rounds. The LCD screen is a consumable. That has been stated to me directly by the manufacturers. If you read the fine print in the warranty you will see that stated as well. The life expectancy of an LCD screen is supposed to be close to 800 hours. I have never gotten close to that.
CHEP
18 hours ago
Great information. LCDs tend to be very temperature sensitive so maybe that is an issue.

StevesPropShop
1 day ago
As stated by others below, this is to do with UV Exposure and heat. Be wary of ‘high speed’ resins. They have a higher exothermic reaction rate which can also damage the LCD. Using an infrared thermometer i tested ‘AmeraLabs’ AMD-3 LED resin which is a super fast cure resin (2.5 sec per layer at 0.03) and it was curing at nearly 54 degrees Celsius on my mars. When the LCD’s are made they are supposed to have a UV filter film added to lengthen their lifespan which obviously they can’t do for these printers. I’ve had screens last months and screens last weeks. Theres nothing you can do to really affect it other than use standard curing resins that don’t give off as much heat and make sure you do usual checks to make sure your vat and build plate are clean etc etc.
zemerick13
15 hours ago
@Dean Rockne As someone that has built PCs…often quieter fans are the better ones actually. Better bearings, lower turbulence, more efficient…all of these make the fan quieter for the same or better cooling.
If heating manages to be a problem, it’d be nearly instant spot heating…which would be practically impossible to cool. Basically, you’d need to chill the resin in the reservoir so that any temperature increase is offset…and I don’t think the resin would respond too well to that. You’re supposed to keep them at room temperature.
Redemptioner1
13 hours ago (edited)
It’s a simple problem, the screens are not designed to work with the UV light, product of cheap printers they use cheap screens. You are looking at over $1000USD wholesale for a screen rated for the UV light to fit these printers, that’s a lot of $30 screen replacements.

 

Embroidery machine, with 3D, printed parts

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According to Hackaday, “Embroidery machine, with 3D, printed parts. Arduino components combined with 3D printed parts. OpenBuilds® V-Slot Belt & Pinion System.Such as an Arduino and stepper drivers for an economical DIY solution. It’s not shown in the photo here, but we particularly like the 3D printed sockets that are screwed into the tabletop. These hold the sewing machine’s “feet”, and allow it to be treated like a modular component that can easily be removed and used normally when needed.”

V-Slot™ Belt & Pinion Example Build

OpenBuilds

AND HE COULD HAVE BEEN THE FATHER OF 3D PRINTING