Tools to achieve the 3D 4D 5D Print creation

The Materialise World Summit(2020)

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According to Materialise,” Let’s discuss ways how we can empower people to design, collaborate, build, and fabricate in more sustainable ways, while reducing waste, saving money, and staying competitive.”

14-15 May 2020

Square Brussels, Belgium

https://www.materialise.com/en

https://www.materialise.com/en/events/corporate/materialise-world-summit/about

http://worldsummit.materialise.com

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3D printed German car(LOCI)

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Accordingly, Daniel Buening, Chief Innovation Officer BigRep, “The vehicle consists of only 14 3D printed parts. The development, from an idea to a finished product, only took 12 weeks, It means that you can design and produce faster. You can print the parts that you need on-demand.
And you can also look at the sustainability aspect: moving spare parts around the world won’t be needed if you produce them locally in the factories instead of flying them across the world.

And you can also look at the sustainability aspect: moving spare parts around the world won’t be needed if you produce them locally in the factories instead of flying them across the world.
We can clearly see that the industry is under pressure. We can see that the technology of today results in large storage spaces, huge distribution networks and problems with transportation. The problems stem from the fact that we have a mass-production system. And mass production is only necessary because we need casting forms and injection casting forms (used in manufacturing) and large machines that need to be set. 3D printing is an alternative to that. We save time, costs and we can put the production in any part of the world.”

Similarly, CGTN’s words,” German 3D company BigRep has created a fully 3D printed car called LOCI. Normal car production is a time-consuming process, but in LOCI’s case, the whole process took only 12 weeks. 3D printed vehicles can also be customized. For example, tall people can order cars with more headspace.

Right now, LOCI is just a prototype. It will be fitted with an electric motor at the start of 2020, and test drives will take place soon after.”

German 3D company creates prototype of fully 3D printed car

3D Printing Chocolate Creations

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According to the lead author of the research paper, Dr. Rahul Karyappa from SUTD and Principal investigator, Assistant Professor Michinao Hashimoto from SUTD, “The simplicity and flexibility of Ci3DP offer great potential in fabricating complex chocolate-based products without the need for temperature control.

Ci3DP is capable of fabricating customized food in a wide range of materials with tailored textures and optimized nutritional content. This new approach also widens the industry’s capabilities in 3D food printing, allowing for the cold-extrusion of food products that are temperature-sensitive.”

The concept of chocolate-based ink 3D printing (Ci3DP) involves liquid chocolate products mixed with edible additives and printed by a direct ink writing (DIW) 3D printer at room temperature. The formulated inks allowed easy extrusion through the syringes and nozzles and form self-supporting layers after extrusion to maintain the printed structures.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-50583-5

 

3D Printing Could Revolutionize Chocolate Creations

3D Printing zero-waste products are coming

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According to Peter H. Diamandis, MD, “3D Printing zero-waste products are coming, Welcome to the 2030 era of tailor-made, rapid-fire, ultra-cheap, and zero-waste product creation… on our planet, and far beyond. 3D Printing on the ISS.
Today, the most expensive supply chain in the known universe extends only 241 miles. Jutting straight up from mission control down here on Earth, this resupply network extends directly to the astronauts aboard the International Space Station (or the ISS).”

3D Printing Everything: Ultra-Cheap, Zero-Waste Products Are Coming

Singularity University

Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology

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According to C. Anandharamakrishnan, Director of IIFPT and corresponding author of the paper published in the Food and Bioprocess Technology., “The printer is approximately the size of a mixie, weighing below 8 kg and can be carried around. It was also indigenously developed and completely fabricated in India. This brings down the cost to less than Rs.75,000, while most printers in the market are expensive and cannot be conveniently used for multi-material food printing applications.”

Get ready for 3D-printed cookies

Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology