3D Printing Entrepreneur

Relativity Space to build the first rocket 3D Printing factory

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With backing from NASA, rocket startup Relativity Space is creating the first autonomous rocket factory. The company is planning to produce 95% of rocket components with 3D printing, and the first orbital launch is expected in late 2020.

 

This is a guest contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop

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Source: www.relativityspace.com

The new agreement will provide the California-based startup with exclusive access to NASA’s infrastructure and financial aid from the Mississippi Development Authority for building a large-scale highly automated 3D printing rocket factory. The company will lease a 20,000-square-meter building at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center for nine years. The test stands and all the necessary equipment on the site allow for convenient engine testing. The agreement provides an option to extend the lease for another 10 years. The company aims to create 200 jobs and invest $59 million in the state. In exchange, the state of Mississippi offers a reimbursement of expenses and a tax incentive package.

image2.jpgSource: www.relativityspace.com

The new factory will produce Relativity Space’s first 3D printed rocket – Terran 1. This vehicle can carry up to 2,756 lbs. into low Earth orbit. Both stages will be powered by 3D printed Aeon engines fueled by methane and liquid oxygen. The first stage will be powered by nine engines, stage two will be equipped with only one. The rocket is priced at $10 million per launch. It is expected that due to the use of the 3D printing technology the manufacturing cycle will not exceed 60 days. 

Although the company is planning to construct its own launch facility, the first rockets will be launched from Cape Canaveral. The launchpad and all the supporting infrastructure will be provided by the U.S. Air Force. The company was allowed to use Launch Complex (LC) 16, which was built for tests of Titan I and Titan II, and then Pershing I and Pershing II missiles. The last launch took place there in 1988. 

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Source: www.relativityspace.com

Most of the metal parts will be manufactured by Stargate, Relativity Space’s first 3D printer. The scalable system features multi-axis robotic arms with lasers. The machine uses metal wire feedstock as a printing material. In February 2019, Relativity Space was granted a machine learning 3D metal printing patent, issued for “real-time adaptive control of additive manufacturing processes using machine learning” (US20180341248A1).

“This agreement demonstrates again NASA’s commitment to work with our industry partners to expand commercial access to low Earth orbit. This helps NASA maintain focus on the ambitious Artemis program that will land the first female and the next male on the south pole of the Moon by 2024,” said Rick Gilbrech, director of  Stennis Space Center. “Relativity is a valuable member of the Stennis federal city and we look forward to building on our already successful partnership.”

The first orbital launch is expected in 2020. The company is planning to enter the commercial market in 2021.

 

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Physna: Compare thousands of 3D models in seconds

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Physna: Compare thousands of 3D models in seconds,
According to Physna’s CEO Paul Powers and Glenn Warner, “Through revolutionary artificial intelligence, Physna uses advanced algorithms to dissect and analyze 3D objects in the blink of an eye.
Many companies have collectively spent billions of dollars on this problem. The reason that Physna is the first to actually fix it is that we used a fundamentally different type of technology.
Compare your IP with others in seconds, ensuring that you’re using the correct models and nobody else is using your designs. Promptly determine if a 3D object matches your standards, allowing you to get to market quicker. Find any 3D object in seconds, old or new, helping to keep department and operation costs to a minimum. Compare any two models instantly and see exactly how much they match with total accuracy and reliability. We call those facets. Everything in nature can be broken down into triangles. We basically analyze the relationship of facets to each other and to the surrounding environment.”

https://www.physna.com/

https://www.wcpo.com/news/insider/don-t-phear-the-phunny-name-physna-could-soon-be-a-1-billion-software-company

https://www.drivecapital.com/index?success=true

https://www.drivecapital.com/

Physna raises $6.9 million to develop “Google of 3D models”

Prellis Biologics has raised $8.7M

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According to Dr. Alex Morgan, Principal at Khosla Ventures and Dr. Melanie Matheu, Prellis Biologics’ co-founder and CEO, “Regenerative medicine has made enormous leaps in recent decades. However, to create complete organs, we need to build higher-order structures like the vascular system. Prellis’ optical technology provides the scaffolding necessary to engineer these larger masses of tissues. With our investment in Prellis, we’re supporting an initiative that will ultimately produce a functioning lobe of the lung, or even a kidney, to be used in addressing an enormous unmet global need.

The human tissue engineering is the ability to build complex tissues with working vascular systems. The future of regenerative medicine revolves around harnessing the power of our own cells as therapeutics and building the tissues to keep them alive. Khosla Ventures is the perfect investor to support our merging of deep tech and cutting-edge regenerative medicine. With this technology in hand, we can begin to ask questions about real 3D cell biology that have never been asked before.”

https://www.prellisbio.com/

https://www.eurekalert.org/

3D-printing an Aventador in the garage

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According to CTV News,” the Colorado physicist Physicist Sterling Backus who’s constructing this lookalike, Lamborghini, using a 3D printer. 3D-printing an Aventador in the garage.”
According to MOTOR, “My son said he loved the Aventador and wondered if it was possible to build one. He did not need to twist my arm too much!”

 

 

https://www.motor1.com/news/358976/lamborghini-aventador-3d-printed-body/

https://www.ctvnews.ca/lifestyle/father-son-team-3d-printing-a-full-size-lamborghini-lookalike-1.4503265

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sterling-backus-17b2a2a7

https://www.whichcar.com.au/news/physicist-3d-print-lamborghini-aventador-garage

3D print your own Vision M Next model

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According to cnet.com, “Vision M Next concept car, BMW launched a new corner of its website that lets people “experience” the car in various ways. The most intriguing is through 3D printing- BMW has released a free STL file that lets people with 3D printers create their own small-scale version of the sharply styled coupe, although the automaker says that the only size limitation is “set by your printer,” so I guess you could build a full-scale model with enough patience.
BMW even gave a tip to go with the STL file. It suggests printing the body and the rims separately, which will “improve the outcome significantly.”

 

https://www.bmwusa.com/vehicles/m-models.html?

https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/bmw-vision-m-next-concept-car-3d-printing-files/

‘TripleCell’ shoe soles

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According to Katherine Petrecca, New Balance General Manager of Footwear at the Innovation Design Studio,” New Balance and Formlabs take a giant step forward in delivering on this vision with the announcement of TripleCell: a premium technology platform powered by Formlabs stereolithography (SLA) 3D printers and completely new material, Rebound Resin. TripleCell 3D printed shoe sole.”

https://www.newbalance.com/pd/990-sport-triplecell/U3DSPTV1-29869-U.html#color=Black_with_Castlerock_and_White&width=D

https://formlabs.com/blog/new-balance-formlabs-drive-footwear-performance-customization/

https://formlabs.com/customer-stories/newbalance/

https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/new-balance-3d-printed-soles-shoe

https://www.wired.com/story/new-balance-triplecell-3d-printed-shoe/

3D Printing News Alert(3D printing in the defence now and before)

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According to Army Technology, “3D printing in the defence manufacturing: issue 100 of Global Defence Technology out now. Global Defence Technology is back for a special celebratory 100th issue, as always packed with the latest industry news and analysis. In this issue, we explore the potential of additive manufacturing for defence applications, speak to Airbus about its involvement in the new DSEI Space Hub launching this year, and more.”

According to EDA’s ground-breaking project, “Additive Manufacturing Feasibility Study & Technology Demonstration. Aims to assess the areas where Additive Manufacturing (AM) (3D-printing) can have a positive impact on defence capabilities and to demonstrate its feasibility. In the morning of 31 May 2017, the 3D-printing lab was loaded on-board a Spanish C-130 and completed a successful 30-minute flight. This test was pivotal to examining the feasibility of the facility to be deployed by air. After landing, the lab and its equipment were inspected and found to have encountered no issues from the airlift.”

3D printing in defence manufacturing: issue 100 of Global Defence Technology out now

3D printed 5G antenna

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According to Mark Mirotznik, professor of electrical engineering at the University of Delaware,” for technologies like wearables and things like that, it means we don’t have to have flat electronics anymore or flat antennas, it can be flexible. So for those applications, it’s really novel that you can actually print all of this stuff on a flexible membrane. It opens up new possibilities. 3D printing (specifically, NanoParticle Jetting technology offered by XJet) is the only manufacturing technique capable of meeting the production demands of a new kind of passive beam steering 5G antenna designed by his team.”

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Researchers see 5G promise in 3D-printing tech

Ashley furniture using 3D printers

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ARCADIA, Wis. Ashley Furniture Inds. is using 3D printers in its manufacturing facilities.
According to Vaughn Pieters, senior director of case good operations, “We’re doing 10% more business out of our Arcadia facility alone with probably almost 15% less labor. Automation has really allowed us to remove some of that heavy physicality. We don’t have employees doing that heavy bulk work all day long anymore. We let the machine do that, so the employees can use their minds and try to better the process”.
According to Ashley,” It’s using printers from Boston-based 3D printing unicorn Formlabs in several of its manufacturing facilities, printing about 700 3D parts, so the machines are able to work right alongside the industrial robots from assembly to fabrication”.

 

https://www.ashleyfurniture.com/

https://www.furnituretoday.com/technology/ashley-furniture-uses-3d-printing-on-factory-floor/

HRE3D+ 3D Printed Titanium Wheel

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HRE3D+ 3D Printed Titanium Wheel. They first started 16 pounds for a 20-inch wheel, and 19 pounds for a 21-inch.
According to HRE President/CEO Alan Peltier, “We’re proud to be breaking new ground in wheel manufacturing with the updated HRE3D+ wheels. HRE utilize the brand’s 3D-printed multiple additive manufacturing systems ‘Direct Metal Laser Melting’ (DMLM). Working with GE Additive has given us access to some truly cutting-edge technology, and we’re exploring the future of wheel technology together with tools that will continue to evolve over the next few years. We can’t wait to see what we’re able to accomplish next”.

https://www.hrewheels.com/store