Systematics of Manufacturing Technologies

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3D printing used to make glass optical fiber preform

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According to Science News and John Canning who led the research team from the University of Technology in Sydney, “Making silica optical fiber involves the labor-intensive process of spinning tubes on a lathe, which requires the fiber’s core or cores to be precisely centered. With additive manufacturing, there’s no need for the fiber geometry to be centered. This removes one of the greatest limitations in fiber design and greatly reduces the cost of fiber manufacturing.
Additive manufacturing approaches such as 3D printing are well suited to change the entire approach to fiber design and purpose. This could, for example, broaden the applications of fiber optic sensors, which far outperform electronic equivalents in terms of longevity, calibration and maintenance but haven’t been widely deployed due to their expensive fabrication.”

 

3D printing used to make glass optical fiber preform

the University of New South Wales

 

 

3D Printing technique and nanoscale fabrication

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According to Sourabh Saha, the paper’s lead and corresponding author is now an assistant professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, “Instead of using a single point of light, we project a million points simultaneously. This scales up the process dramatically because instead of working with a single point that has to be scanned to create the structure, we can use an entire plane of projected light. Instead of focusing on a single point, we have an entire focused plane that can be patterned into arbitrary structures.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/627104/original

 

3D Printing Technique Accelerates Nanoscale Fabrication a Thousandfold

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

Kijenzi is one of many ventures in the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship program that approaches real-world issues with Penn State know-how.

The World’s Fastest Dental Model 3D Printer

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This is a guest contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop

Structo, Singapore-based dental 3D printer manufacturer partners with Ulab, a U.S.-based orthodontic treatment planning software developer to modernize the production of clear dental aligners. The two companies announced their partnership focused on supplying various segments of the market with their new dentistry solutions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: www.structo3d.com

In the framework of the new project, Structo’s DentaForm 3D printer will be used together with the uLab uDesign treatment planning software to create aligner models. The 3D printer will become a part of the uLab’s uPrint ecosystem.

 Joe Breeland, chief commercial officer at uLab commented: “DentaForm’s high throughput capabilities of printing up to 10 arches in 30 minutes is exactly what existing uLab customers need to help them with their in-office aligner manufacturing.” 

The companies’ cooperation will also include working on additional solutions, such as Structo’s Velox desktop 3D printer and Structo Elements, a modular 3D printing system capable of printing up to 500 models per day.

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asDMnBZDXZg (Structo 3D)

“Our teams will also collaborate on new products that will involve the rest of our portfolio,” said a chief commercial officer at Structo, Dhruv Sahgal. “On top of our Velox desktop 3D printer, another exciting new solution that we are working on is an aligner specific module for our Elements automated and modular factory in a box.”

Structo introduced its first dental 3D printers back in 2014 – they were intended for building patient-specific devices and dental models. Structo’s proprietary technology MSLA (Mask Stereolithography) allows to print much faster than other SLA 3D printers. One of the key partners of the company is ClearCaps, a German clear dental aligner manufacturer. Last year, ClearCaps managed to produce 250 models per day with the DentaForm system.

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lE8TxgpXx9M (Structo 3D)

The new joint project involves the integration of the DentaForm system into the uLab platform that allows dentists to create digital models based on intraoral 3D digital scans of the patients. uLab allows orthodontists to quickly design treatment plans for aligners and create dental movement plans. The resulting 3D digital model can be exported directly to 3D printers in dental practitioner’s office. Since the software’s launch in summer of 2018, it was utilized in treatment of over 13,000 dental patients. 

Structo DentaForm is the seventh 3D printer integrated into the uLab platform. Others include Carbon M2; the Objet 500 and 260VS Dental selection from Stratasys; the Formlabs Form 2 and Vida and Micro XL from EnvisionTec.