SV3DPrinter’s vision for future 3D printers

The Formnext trade fair 2019 purmundus challenge

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According to The 2019 purmundus challenge,” which is being held from 19 to 22 November 2019 in Frankfurt in hall 12.1-E09 of the Formnext trade fair, shines a spotlight on forward-looking product ideas from 18 countries on 5 continents under the motto “Beyond 3D printing. This is the seventh time that the 3D and 4D printing award for the purmundus challenge has been presented in Frankfurt. A total of 38 finalists now stand a chance of winning the prestigious purmundus challenge trophy. The award ceremony will be broadcast live from the Formnext exhibition via the Facebook portal. In addition to the first three places, this year there will once again be a “special mention” and an “innovation prize”. A prize for the “people’s choice”, voted for over the course of the fair by visitors to Formnext 2019, completes the purmundus challenge.

International exhibition and conference on 3D printing / additive manufacturing & tooling (19-22 Nov 2019).

The purmundus challenge looks ahead beyond 3D printing

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$12 trillion 3D printing industry with the 4th Industrial Revolution

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According to Joel Dreyfuss from CNBC, “3-D printing is disrupting the $12 trillion manufacturing industry worldwide, and companies such as Ford, L’Oreal, Siemens and others are training workforces to adopt skills in this technology.”
According to Dr. Bryony Core, senior technology analyst at IDTechEx, an independent analyst firm based in Cambridgeshire, England, “3-D printing is having the largest impact on industries which manufacture low-volume, high-value parts which may benefit from mass customization.”

 

How 3-D printing is transforming the $12 trillion manufacturing industry and fueling the 4th Industrial Revolution

3D printed replacement Tissue

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According to Anthony Atala, M.D., director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) and senior author on the study, “This novel tissue and organ printer is an important advance in our quest to make replacement tissue for patients. It can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue of any shape. With further development, this technology could potentially be used to print living tissue and organ structures for surgical implantation. Our results indicate that the bio-ink combination we used, combined with the micro-channels, provides the right environment to keep the cells alive and to support cell and tissue growth.”

Scientists Prove Feasibility of “Printing” Replacement Tissue

3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

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According to A. Fatih Sarioglu, an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)“Isolating circulating tumor cells from whole blood samples has been a challenge because we are looking for a handful of cancer cells mixed with billions of normal red and white blood cells. With this device, we can process a clinically-relevant volume of blood by capturing nearly all of the white blood cells and then filtering out the red blood cells by size. That leaves us with undamaged tumor cells that can be sequenced to determine the specific cancer type and the unique characteristics of each patient’s tumor.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/628242/original

 

3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included