SV3DPrinter’s ‘Must see posts’

3D printed clear aligners

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3D printed clear aligners. According to Clinique Dentaire Casablanca, “The Invisalign system is a combination of proprietary virtual modeling software, rapid manufacturing processes, and mass customization, and virtually clear, removable appliances or “aligners” that are used to straighten teeth.”

From comments,

Andrew Thiyam
1 year ago
Can Invisalign also correct “Deepbite” to some extent??

CoChief Emeralds
9 months ago
I have those Invisalign trays for 8 more months

CoChief Emeralds
9 months ago
It took 8 to 10 weeks for my aligners to be ready because they had to do a quality check and all that good stuff let alone deciding if I need attachments on my teeth.

 

We use cutting-edge technology to manufacture best-in-class Clear Aligners

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Eden Prairie Company Makes 3D Printed Dresses

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According to Ryan Schultz, the Vice President of Vertical Marketing at Stratasys, “We can do full color, clear, flexible, rigid, all in one print, so the opportunities are nearly limitless.[Our] 3D printing technology is the only technology that can print at such a fine level, multiple colors within clear, to get that iridescent shimmering effect you see in a butterfly’s wing.”

From some comments,

Phenolphthalein
2 years ago
I wonder how much stronger it would be if you were to iron the plastic into the shirt through a sheet of parchment paper. That might help prevent the very slight peeling of the edges on the lion’s mane after the wash.
Cat3D
2 years ago
So I didn’t get it what your final settings are now to achieve the flawless result. 😆

Isaac Graham
2 years ago
Glad you used the flexible filament, It seems to work extremely well

Peter Woo
2 years ago
Been waiting for this 🙂 !!!

Peter Adlam
2 years ago
I wonder if using the ‘Avoid crossing outline for travel moves’ in the advanced tab of Simplify 3d would help to cut down on the stringing?

Miguel Velásquez Ferreiro
1 month ago
The flexible filament has resisted multiple washes?

WTF BBQ
2 years ago
will it survive in the dryer ??

Sailor Barsoom
1 year ago
That is GORGEOUS! If’n I ever get a 3D printer, I am so doing this.

Spcsmrf
2 years ago
Can you recommend where to buy 3d printers like the cr-10 in Sweden?

Peer Appel
2 years ago
Wow, I’m almost buying a 3d-printer just for this 🙂

Muhammad Agung
1 year ago
This print not beater than i3 Mega for flexibel filament?
Backis03
2 years ago
hey can I buy a RcLifeOn t-shirt of you?

Rotem Barzily
2 years ago
Should I buy the Anycubic Kossel as the first 3D printer?
ClickernVideo
1 year ago
Goodday ..
How large have you extruded the drawing ? 0.5 mm using a buse of 0.4 mm ?

Minas Giannopoulos
2 years ago
Did you do any mods on your CR-10 to print flexible material? Also can you share your Simplify3D settings you ended up using?

Sébastien Van Deun
2 years ago
This is absolutely amazing, I can’t wait to try it when my 3d printer will be set up to print flex filament!

Shit Storm
2 years ago
Anyone got a link for “good” flexible filament or brands from Aliexpress? I would be very thankfull 🙂
vidznstuff1
2 years ago
Hey Simon – thanks for responding to those of us with the torches and pitchforks regarding the flex filament. You blew my mind using a STOCK CR-10 to do this…please share the machine settings to get Ninjaflex successfully through a CR-10 extruder.

theodoros sirios
2 years ago
were did you buy the cords for your printers
what 3D printer i should buy Anet A8 or Anet A6

Alessio Ravoni
1 year ago
I can use any TPU filament?
David Reece
10 months ago
Machine washable?

Christoffer Nørskov
2 years ago
Oh nice, 3DEksperten is situated in the same city I live in, and is where I got my printer, and most of my filament.

roidroid
1 year ago
Slic3r has an option “Avoid crossing perimeters”, which stops the print-head from travelling over your clean lines and leaving goop everywhere. You may be able to find similar options in your slicer of choice.

Luke Turner
2 years ago
very interesting and a great idea ! (reminds me of the old 3D printer days when new things would be found every week!). you might get different results with different tshirts, as you get 100% cotton shirts then you get polyester shirts which have a % of plastic in them. this would get better results i dare say. but very interested might have a go my self at some point

Alluvian
1 year ago
Do you have any issues with priming the nozzle? I have not played with different slicers and startup gcode, but in cura for lulzbot it always prints the skirt around the base to prime the nozzle. Looked like you were manually priming the nozzle and turning off the skirt?

edwin k
2 years ago
Can you show your 3d printing files in free or cheap other software, because i am noet at school anymore so i must buy yhe 3d modeling en printing software.

Fer Jerez
2 years ago
Great video! I don’t know how to do it in S3D but Cura slicer has a ‘Combing mode’ that minimices retractions making the nozzle travel over the printed parts. I use it when printing flexible filaments making almost zero ‘stringing’. May you find it useful for this kind of experiments.
Great work!!

 

Eden Prairie Company Makes 3D Printed Dresses Worn At NY Fashion Week

Make it with Stratasys

 

3D printed a “rabbit-sized” heart

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According to BIOLIFE4D, “We have developed a proprietary bioink using a very specific composition of different extracellular matrix compounds that closely replicate the properties of the mammalian heart. Further, it has developed a novel and unique bioprinting algorithm, consisting of printing parameters optimized for the whole heart. Coupling its proprietary bioink with patient-derived cardiomyocytes and its enabling bioprinting technology, BIOLIFE4D is able to bioprint a heart that, while smaller in size, replicates many of the features of a human heart. With this platform technology in place, BIOLIFE4D is now well-positioned to build upon this platform and work towards the development of a full-scale human heart.”

 

BIOLIFE4D Just 3D Printed A Human ‘Mini-Heart’

BIOLIFE4D Reaches Groundbreaking Milestone and Successfully 3D Bioprints a Mini-Heart

https://english.tau.ac.il/

Evonik invests in Chinese 3D-printing start-up making medical implants

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According to Ken Jin, co-founder, and chief technology officer of Meditool, “Meditool is one of the pioneers in developing 3D printed PEEK medical implants. Evonik has been our trusted partner in materials supply. The venture investment will be an extra boost to our endeavor to bring innovative solutions to patients and surgeons in China and the rest of the world.”
Evonik’s venture capital arm has already invested in two funds in China and with Meditool, it now has its first direct investment. Co-investors in Meditool include ZN Ventures, Morningside Ventures, and Puhua Capital.

Evonik invests in Chinese 3D-printing start-up making medical implants

EVONIK

The better way to 3D print organs

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According to the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and co-first author Mark Skylar-Scott, Ph.D., a Research Associate at the Wyss Institute, “This is an entirely new paradigm for tissue fabrication. Rather than trying to 3D-print an entire organ’s worth of cells, SWIFT (sacrificial writing into functional tissue) )focuses on only printing the vessels necessary to support a living tissue construct that contains large quantities of OBBs, which may ultimately be used therapeutically to repair and replace human organs with lab-grown versions containing patients’ own cells.”

A Swifter Way Towards 3D-printed Organs

Latest Harvard Gazette News

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs

Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology

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According to C. Anandharamakrishnan, Director of IIFPT and corresponding author of the paper published in the Food and Bioprocess Technology., “The printer is approximately the size of a mixie, weighing below 8 kg and can be carried around. It was also indigenously developed and completely fabricated in India. This brings down the cost to less than Rs.75,000, while most printers in the market are expensive and cannot be conveniently used for multi-material food printing applications.”

Get ready for 3D-printed cookies

Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology

Air Force lab and 3D printing

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According to Hilmar Koerner, Ph.D., research team lead for polymer matrix composite materials and processes at the AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, “Additive manufacturing is important to the future of aerospace for a variety of reasons. Benefits include complexity enabled capability; low-volume, low-cost manufacturing; part reduction; improved form-fit function; tool-less part manufacturing; and lightweighting of interior hardware, such as air ducts, seat framework and wall panels.”

According to Jeffery Baur, Ph.D., leader of the AFRL Composite Performance Research Team, “Printing composites can produce parts with complex shapes and eliminates the need for the expensive pressure cooker and long heating cycles. The possibility to produce parts in the field or at a depot without a long logistics tail is a win-win scenario.”

Air Force lab takes 3D printing to new heights

Recycled Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

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Recycled Cellulose Polypropylene Composite Feedstocks for Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing. According to ACS publications,” Many types of consumer-grade packaging can be used in material extrusion additive manufacturing processes, providing a high-value output for waste plastics. However, many of these plastics have reduced mechanical properties and increased warpage/shrinkage compared to those commonly used in three-dimensional (3D) printing. Recycled polypropylene/waste paper, cardboard, and wood flour composites were made using a solid-state shear pulverization process.”

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Recycled Cellulose Polypropylene Composite Feedstocks for Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

Hasbro To Eliminate Plastic Packaging

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According to Hasbro, “one of the world’s largest toy manufacturers, has stepped up its sustainability game and is phasing out all plastics used to package its toys and games by the end of 2022. phasing out plastic from new product packaging, including plastic elements like polybags, elastic bands, shrink wrap, window sheets, and blister packs.3D printed toy designers should ramp up their knowledge about alternative sustainable materials.”

Hasbro Says It’s Game Over For Plastic Packaging

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Hasbro To Eliminate Plastic Packaging