Learn how 3D print (Medical)

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3D Printing For Cardiology

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According to Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director, structural heart imaging at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit,” explains how her center uses 3-D printing and computer-aided design (CAD) software to improve patient outcomes. She spoke to DAIC at the 2017 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting. ‘The Use of 3-D Printing in Cardiology’ and “Henry Ford Hospital Study Shows 3-D Imaging Improves Fixing Broken Hearts.”

According to Rob Beanlands, M.D., FASNC, 2019 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) president, shares a couple of trends he sees in cardiac nuclear imaging. He is the Vered Chair and division head of cardiology and director of the National Cardiac PET Centre at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada. He said,” overall trends he sees in nuclear cardiology include the use of better myocardial reserve quantification so it is clear whether revascularization would help patients. Beanlands also said there is increasing interest in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging because of its superior image quality and increasing access to PET radiotracers. New tracers on the horizon will also increase the image quality and flexibility of PET to accommodate exercise stress.”

 

The Future of 3-D Printing in Medicine

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer-Aided Design

VIDEO: Better Flow Quantification and Rise of PET Among Trends in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging

3-D Printed heart model and surgeons information

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According to NewYork-Presbyterian,” Dr. Farooqi went on to complete an advanced imaging fellowship at Kravis Children’s Hospital, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Farooqi’s research focuses on the use of 3D printed and digital cardiac models to improve care for patients with congenital heart disease. She was granted the Glorney Raisbeck Fellowship Award by the New York Academy of Medicine to identify the optimal cardiac MRI sequences in creating 3D models. Prior to joining Columbia, Dr. Farooqi was a full-time faculty member at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School for two years and led the pediatric cardiology service for the University Hospital in Newark.”

 

3-D PRINTED HEART MODELS GIVE SURGEONS VITAL INFORMATION ABOUT A HEART’S ANATOMY

Rapid Prototyping in Cardiac Disease: 3D Printing the Heart 

Kanwal M. Farooqi, MD

 

3D printed replacement Tissue

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According to Anthony Atala, M.D., director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) and senior author on the study, “This novel tissue and organ printer is an important advance in our quest to make replacement tissue for patients. It can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue of any shape. With further development, this technology could potentially be used to print living tissue and organ structures for surgical implantation. Our results indicate that the bio-ink combination we used, combined with the micro-channels, provides the right environment to keep the cells alive and to support cell and tissue growth.”

Scientists Prove Feasibility of “Printing” Replacement Tissue

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

3D printing used to make glass optical fiber preform

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According to Science News and John Canning who led the research team from the University of Technology in Sydney, “Making silica optical fiber involves the labor-intensive process of spinning tubes on a lathe, which requires the fiber’s core or cores to be precisely centered. With additive manufacturing, there’s no need for the fiber geometry to be centered. This removes one of the greatest limitations in fiber design and greatly reduces the cost of fiber manufacturing.
Additive manufacturing approaches such as 3D printing are well suited to change the entire approach to fiber design and purpose. This could, for example, broaden the applications of fiber optic sensors, which far outperform electronic equivalents in terms of longevity, calibration and maintenance but haven’t been widely deployed due to their expensive fabrication.”

 

3D printing used to make glass optical fiber preform

the University of New South Wales

 

 

3D bioprinting of tissues and organs

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According to Yehiel Tal, the Chief Executive Officer of CollPlant, “This fund raising is intended to support the advancement of our pipeline in the fields of medical aesthetics and 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. We are now focused on facilitating our development programs of dermal fillers and regenerative breast implants. Our collaboration with United Therapeutics, which is using our BioInk technology for 3D printing lungs, is progressing, and we continue to expand our business collaborations with large international healthcare companies that seek to implement our revolutionary regenerative medicine technology. We are very pleased to have entered into this transaction with Mr. Sagi and the other investors.”

 

CollPlant Biotechnologies Raising $5.5 Million