Environment-friendly sustainable 3D print Prototyping with the Oceans Plastics Engineering Projects

Sand 3D Printer before and now

Posted on Updated on

According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
Category
7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

Is a sand 3D printer the future of Additive Manufacturing?

Advertisements

The Lightyear One is 3D printed

Posted on Updated on

More than 55 interior parts for the Lightyear One are 3D printed.
According to Lex Hoefsloot, CEO of Lightyear announces and Robert Llewellyn, ” gets an exclusive first look at the Lightyear One hyper-efficient luxury sedan, a partially solar-powered electric car. And gets to experience it as one of the first passengers!

When Solar Team Eindhoven won the world solar challenge in Australia driving a 4 seater 100% solar-powered car over 3,000 kilometers, no one would have believed that a handful of years later they could come up with this.
Lightyear One. A spacious hyper-efficient partially solar-powered electric car.
We know the future is electric, could it be solar electric.”

 

 

 

 

Always charging in the sun. Longest range. Most sustainable.

Fabbaloo

Awesome to be green:)

Posted on Updated on

Awesome to be green:)
3D printing technology to be fully Eco-friendly.3D printing technology uses large amounts of energy, larger than the amount used by milling and drilling machines.
If you think about failed prints you may somehow eventually recycle the plastic.
Plastics products may take up to a thousand years to compost while PLA products compost within 3-6 months in a composting system.
PLA-  is made from renewable sources, such as starch – corn, potatoes, soy protein, cellulose, and lactic acid, cassava, sugarcane or sugar beet pulp, all of them are compostable, but this process is only considered “composted” The material breaks down into carbon dioxide, water, and biomass.
3D printing waste happens –

when sometimes layers aren’t sticking together properly in mid-print and depending on the model’s geometry it might cause a failure.
This could be because you’re 3D printing at a temperature that’s a bit too low.
Precaution-

Increase the print temperature slightly and ensure those layers fuse into each other.
In 3D printing, two most common filaments to print with are ABS plastic, PLA, polyamide (nylon), glass filled polyamide, stereolithography materials (epoxy resins), silver, titanium, steel, wax, photopolymers, and polycarbonate.
3D printing uses sustainable manufacturing method. Because it reduces waste.
Later its applications range from medical devices to aerospace — and possibly even drinking water.
ABS – is a thermoplastic that is great for 3D printing because of its strength and durability. This material is not biodegradable or compostable but can be recycled.
ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene), which Lego is made from, is a safe plastic. BabyBjorn also uses ABS – it’s BPA free. Plastics made from corn starch resin are lumped into the #7 category, and these are BPA free too.
Nylon –  is BPA free, and it’s a #7.
These numbers are for which plastics are healthier for you and more easily recyclable?

4 Ways to Recycle Failed 3D Prints

What do the numbers on plastics mean?

#1 plastics: PET or PETE (polyethylene terephthalate)(Is it safe? -No)
#2 plastics: HDPE (high-density polyethylene)(Is it safe?- YES)

#3 plastics: PVC (polyvinyl chloride or plasticized polyvinyl chloride)(Is it safe?- NO)

#4 plastics: LDPE (low-density polyethylene)(Is it safe?-YES)

#5 plastics: PP (polypropylene)(Is it safe?- YES)

#6 plastics: PS (polystyrene)(Is it safe?-NO)

#7 plastics: other (all other plastics, including acrylic and nylon)(Is it safe?- NOT SURE)

If you want to reuse any material

Use precautions-

can re-heat the material to use it again in a filament recycler.
If we like to do some craftwork, get a ‘ProtoCycler’ and make your filament.
https://redetec.com/
ProtoCycler+
ReDeTec Protocycler – OMG it works!

This kind recycler will smash failed prints into smaller pieces, melt them down, and force the liquid plastic through an opening.

 

 

RECYCLING WITH STRATASYS

What do the numbers on plastics mean?

Fabbaloo

Filabot 3D Printing Recycling Company Logo

The 3D Printer Filament Recycler’s Guide

 

Is 3D printing worth it?

Posted on Updated on

Is 3D printing worth it? According to, Marius Hornberger “A few real-world workshop examples that make use of 3D-printing.
I hate how 3D printers are always advertised with the things they can make. Mostly figures or models of stuff that just looks cool in the first moment, but very few people actually need that.
That’s why I didn’t want to dive into 3D printing for some time. Since I then had access to the printer of my dad I came up with a few things that actually make good use of a printer for the workshop.
The materials I used were PLA and PETG. Everything that was white was PETG and the rest was PLA.
I use SolidWorks for designing.”

According to comments from the video,”

  • Yes, you can make parts that don’t exist and make replacement parts for existing equipment.
  • Sometimes you seem like a wise old guy who’s been around precision workshops for decades, passing on your skills to the youngsters in the audience. I’m 74 years old and enjoy being one of the youngsters. Those endless examples of your high-quality design & 3D printing had me captivated.
    -It was one of the best videos about practical 3d printed parts. Great job!
  • Genius use of 3D printing. Really inspiring!
  • My 3D printer is my favorite woodworking tool. You demonstrated excellent use of it. Your designs are well thought out and I can tell you’ve spent some time on them. Well done!
  • An excellent video highlighting practical uses of 3D Printers.
  • the biggest negative on 3d printing is time. granted you don’t have to sit there watching the printer doing its job but you still need to keep an eye on it in case something fails and I don’t have a good feeling about letting a machine work for that long all alone. other than that, I love my 3d printer a lot, even though it’s only a cheap version of the original i3, it still produces reasonable prints.
  • Awesome work, I also have a 3d printer (mk3 and MK2s) and a workshop. I’ve made dovetail templates, corner clamps, screw boxes, drilling templates and more. Your designs are really good, I love the chamfer interlock system you designed for the connections. Is that all in PLA.”

Please tell us what is your opinion:)

 

 

 

 

PETG

Original Prusa i3 MK3

Fourth Industrial Revolution technology in ‘Sierra Leone’

Posted on

According to the President Julius Maada Bio,” the West African country of Sierra Leone used a 3D printer to create a map of Sierra Leone with the distribution of the number of girls not attending primary schools across the country. The idea evolved over lunch at State House where senior government officials were discussing the status of education within the country.”
According to the head of UK’s Department of Foreign International Development Mary Hunt, “the fact you can pick it up and turn it around to see different aspects of the map makes you feel like you are there – in Kenema, Kabala, or Bonthe – seeing the challenges in peoples lives and what needs to change. I was so drawn to its clarity and potential I had to ask the President if I could take it with me I wanted to share it with others.”
This is the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution technology’.

 

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/06/sierra-leone-3d-printing-model-state/

http://www.sierra-leone.org/

Beyond nature, 3D printed Wood tissue

Posted on

 

According to the Professor Paul Gatenholm, who has led this research within Chalmers University of Technology’s Wallenberg Wood Science Centre and researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden,” have succeeded in 3D printing with a wood-based ink in a way that mimics the unique ‘ultrastructure’ of wood. Their research could revolutionize the manufacturing of green products. Through emulating the natural cellular architecture of wood, they now present the ability to create green products derived from trees, with unique properties – everything from clothes, packaging, and furniture to healthcare and personal care products.
This is a breakthrough in manufacturing technology. It allows us to move beyond the limits of nature, to create new sustainable, green products. It means that those products which today are already forest-based can now be 3D printed, in a much shorter time. And the metals and plastics currently used in 3D printing can be replaced with a renewable, sustainable alternative.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352940718304918?via%3Dihub#fig0025

http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Mimicking-the-ultrastructure-of-wood-with-3D-printing-for-green-products.aspx

https://newatlas.com/wood-nanocellulose-3d-printing/60347/

Cellulose-Based, 3D Printed IoT Sensors

Posted on Updated on

According to Simon Fraser University professor Woo Soo Kim, “this novel wireless chemical sensing platform technology will usher various sensing applications such as biomedical or environmental detection.
If we are able to change the plastics in PCB to cellulose composite materials, recycling of metal components on the board could be collected in a much easier way.”

According to Wiley Online Library, “A 3D printable conductive ink is designed and optimized with cellulose nanofibers by addition of silver nanowires for sustainable and biocompatible sensor applications. Polyimide film which has high surface hydrophobicity is used as a substrate for better resolution of printing.”

https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/researchers-develop-cellulose-based-3d-printed-iot-sensors/

https://www.sfu.ca/mechatronics/people/faculty/woosoo_kim.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/aelm.201800778

3D Printing News Alert(For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene)

Posted on Updated on

Graphene is strong, light, thin and flexible. It is the thinnest substance capable of conducting electricity, is an efficient thermal conductor and is optically transparent. Graphene is also more resistant to tearing than steel and is almost impermeable.

For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene.

According to GrapheneCa Head of Business Development David Robles,” Proactive Investors to discuss the technology company that is integrating graphene into the real world using their own environmentally friendly production process.

Robles telling Proactive about the company’s revenue streams and when they are expecting to be profitable.”

According to Hodge,” Adding graphene to plastic composites can improve the tensile strength and stiffness of packaging. Graphene won’t make the material indestructible but it may be possible to reduce packaging size while maintaining the same properties. This has obvious advantages for transporting fragile goods and may also contribute to recycling. Today, recycling plastics degrades the quality of the plastic – it can be recycled an average of three times, but adding graphene to recycled plastics can improve its strength so that it can be recycled many times more. Because they are printed, [the capacitive touch sensors] can be any size or shape and printed in volume.”

According to Chris Jones, technical manager at Novalia, a partner in the EU’s Graphene Flagship, “Our mission statement is to make technology disappear into everyday items.
The ink is supplied by Researchers at the University of Cambridge, University of Manchester and produced by micro fluidization.”

According to Francesca Rosella, co-founder of CuteCircuit, “A dress was designed to illustrate the material’s strength, transparency, and conductivity. The shape and decoration of the dress represent the design of a graphene crystal. We examined graphene under a microscope to see the hexagonal structure and enlarged it to help people understand graphene’s molecular structure.”

According to the TechRadar, “Mobile warming the graphene jacket can also conduct electricity, but creator Vollebak has decided to dampen down this ability to protect wearers. Prototypes of the jacket were so conductive that the wearer could hold a battery in one hand and a light bulb in the other, and have the bulb light up, but Vollebak decided that, although interesting, it was best to play it safe and make the material a little more resistant.”

According to Researchers at Osaka Universities co-author Kazuhiko Matsumoto,” Our biosensor enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of bacteria that cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer by limiting its reaction in a well-defined microvolume. They have invented a new biosensor using graphene, which is a material that consists of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to detect bacteria like those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact with the biosensor, chemical reactions are triggered which are detected by graphene. To enable detection of the chemical reaction products, the researchers used microfluidics to contain the bacteria in tiny droplets that are close to the surface of the sensor.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2qz

 

https://youtu.be/IesIsKMjB4Y

 

 

https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2019/06/graphene-what-is-it-good-for/

https://www.techradar.com/news/with-this-graphene-jacket-youll-never-be-too-hot-too-cold-or-too-smelly

https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/22914/20190622/using-graphene-and-tiny-droplets-to-detect-stomach-cancer-causing-bacteria.htm

3D Printing News Alert(3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces)

Posted on Updated on

3D printed flexible mesh for ankle and knee braces. According to Sebastian Pattinson, who conducted the research as a postdoc at MIT and associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart, “This work is new in that it focuses on the mechanical properties and geometries required to support soft tissues.3-D-printed clothing and devices tend to be very bulky. We were trying to think of how we can make 3-D-printed constructs more flexible and comfortable, like textiles and fabrics. The beauty of this technique lies in its simplicity and versatility. Mesh can be made on a basic desktop 3-D printer, and the mechanics can be tailored to precisely match those of soft tissue.”

http://news.mit.edu/2019/3-d-print-mesh-ankle-knee-braces-0619

Generative design for 3D printing

Posted on Updated on

According to BigRep CEO Stephan Beyer, Ph.D.,” Our BANYAN ECO WALL is adopting nature’s principle with a complex, smart, and elegant design only achievable with AM. Traditional technologies such as milling or injection molding cannot deliver this level of complexity and dual functionality. For the first time, thanks to AM and advanced CAD software, it is now possible to create complex functional designs within a fully digitized process chain.”
BigRep CIO and NOWLAB Managing Director Daniel Büning add, “Generative design software was crucial in the creation of the BANYAN ECO WALL to optimize the structure for printability and stability while allowing a rapid iterative design process. This prototype will push the boundaries of AM not only in irrigated plant systems, such as in vertical farming and green facades but for any application requiring embedded functionalities.”

http://autode.sk/GenerativeDesign

Fractal works 3D Printed sculpture at Mumbai Airport

Posted on Updated on

According to Fractal Works IMTEX 2019, “this is an excellent run at the event, and cannot stop talking about it! Hundreds thronged our stall wanting to learn more, and see what 3D printing is all about.
We had an eclectic mix of visitors including professionals from manufacturing, product design, engineering, teachers, entrepreneurs, interior designers, gifts and artifacts people, students, architects and all other kinds of backgrounds. One thing in common was that they were all really fascinated with the possibilities of 3D printing.”

 

http://www.nudeoffices.com/