Complex Geometry in additive manufacturing design

Golden medal experts award ITM,2019

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According to REMET Inc.,” has its own process & engineering department and complex machine park which includes large-size machining equipment that allows us to produce highly processed steel structures.”
According to 3D Lab,” is a company with over 10 years of experience and an established position in the 3D printing industry. Its main focus is the delivery and maintenance of additive manufacturing devices. 3D Lab has established a leading position in the field of professional and production-oriented AM systems in the domestic market. It also provides research and development services, commercial 3D printing, and parameter optimization of metal powders melting processes. A wide scope of cooperation with leading scientific centers allows 3D Lab to offer professional, comprehensive services, including preparation of material data sheets for the produced materials.”

 

REMET Inc.

3D LAB

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3D printed liquid silicone rubber

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According to German RepRap, “create future-oriented technologies and implement them in the design and production of our 3D printers. Since 2010 we have been developing our X-Series 3D Printers based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technology. The special feature of all printers is the Open Source Platform, which makes it possible to use a variety of materials for printing. New consumables are constantly being tested and added to our product range. The Liquid Additive Manufacturing (LAM) process, liquids such as silicone rubber can also be processed.”

 

DOW CHEMICAL EVOLV3D

German RepRap

 

Three Guinness World Records related to the largest 3D printer

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According to Sen. Susan Collins, “I was delighted to join UMaine’s celebration unveiling the world’s largest 3D printer and largest 3D-printed object. The future of the [UMaine] Composites Center is bright, thanks to the excellent working relationship between UMaine, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many other federal agencies, which will support next-generation, large-scale additive manufacturing with biobased thermoplastics. As a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I helped secure $20 million for this exciting collaboration, and an additional $20 million is included in the committee-approved energy funding bill. By working together, UMaine and Oak Ridge will strengthen environmentally responsible advanced manufacturing throughout America, as well as the forest-products industry in Maine.”

According to Sen. Angus King, “Maine is the most forested state in the nation, and now we have a 3D printer big enough to make use of this bountiful resource. Today marks the latest innovative investment in Maine’s forest economy, which will serve to increase sustainability, advance the future of biobased manufacturing and diversify our forest products industry. This is a huge opportunity for the state of Maine, and I’m grateful to everyone — especially the the University of Maine and the FOR/Maine initiative — for their work to make this day a reality.”

According to U.S. Rep. Jared Golden, “As we saw today, the University of Maine Composites Center does award-winning, cutting-edge research that makes Maine proud and will bring jobs to our state. Their work, like the boat and 3D printer we’re here to see, has impressive potential to change how we make things out of all sorts of materials — including Maine wood fiber. Today is about three Guinness World Records, but it’s also about celebrating the innovation that will help protect and create good-paying Maine jobs in forest products and manufacturing.”

According to Moe Khaleel, associate laboratory director for Energy and Environmental Sciences at ORNL, “This is an exciting achievement in our partnership with the University of Maine. This new equipment will accelerate application and integration of our fundamental materials science, plant genomics and manufacturing research to the development of new sustainable bioderived composites, creating economic opportunity for Maine’s forest products industry and the nation.”

UMaine Composites Center receives three Guinness World Records related to largest 3D printer

World’s largest 3D printed boat

5 Ways You Can Use 3D Printing Technology For Your Small Business

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Guest Post by Madeline Dudziak

Also a huge fan of reading – perhaps a natural result of being named after the famous children’s book – Madeline’s Kindle is always crammed with more books than leisure time allows. Among other ways, she spends her free time are fun activities with her husband and young children, volunteering, and participating in two book clubs.

5 Ways You Can Use 3D Printing Technology For Your Small Business

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At one point in time, a 3D printer was something only large scale manufacturing businesses really benefitted from. 3D printers were bulky, and just not easily accessible for someone not in a large factory-type setting. It was helpful in those environments but there didn’t seem to be a clear path to getting 3D printing technology into smaller settings. 

3D printers being for large businesses is no longer the reality, however. Many small businesses have been able to start using 3D printers for their benefit. There are a lot of ways you can use a 3D printer that you may not have considered yet. 3D printing technology is everywhere now. Printers are smaller, more affordable, and easier than ever to use.

If you’ve been thinking about buying a 3D printer for your small business but you haven’t made the leap yet, it’s time to start considering what a 3D printer can really do for you. 3D printing technology could change how you’re doing things now in a big way. If you’re still not convinced, here are five ways you can use 3D printing technology for your small business.

1. Easy, Quick Prototypes

When you’re developing a new product for your business, getting a prototype in your hands can be a bit of a hassle. If you don’t have an in-house production team (and most small businesses don’t) then you’ll likely have to place an order with a large production company. Depending on where the company is located costs and production time can be huge obstacles.

As you’re creating your new product you may hold off on ordering extra prototypes for every small change due to the aforementioned costs. This can result in you not being able to see and hold every design iteration. It can leave you wondering what a small change will do to the look and functionality of your product because you don’t have a concrete example to look at.

With 3D printing, you’ll have the chance to print out your own prototype. Adjusting a small part (or even a large part) of your product’s design to fix a flaw just means you have to print a new prototype. It’s easy to do and design changes are as easy as adjusting the printer plans you’ve already created. 

Being able to print your own prototypes gives you a whole host of new possibilities. In addition to being able to see each design iteration, you’ll also be able to print prototypes for customers or investors to look at or take with them. You’re the one in control of the prototyping process when you use a 3D printer because you have the power to create whatever you need. That’s a big deal.

2. Use Your Printer To Drum Up Interest

Customers love freebies, it’s a fact. Whether it’s a free gift with purchase or a token of appreciation when you give your customers something their loyalty for your business will increase. So offer them something they actually can’t get somewhere else and 3D print your logo onto something. 

When you can offer a unique freebie, even something fairly minor like a coaster or business card that you have 3D printed in-house you will not only save money on incidental free gifts but you will have created something buzzworthy. When the word gets out that you’re offering something no one else can people are going to want to hop on that bandwagon!

If you create demand for your freebie, you can create demand for your business. Consider printing your token in multiple colors. That way your regular customers can collect them. (Perhaps when they have a full set they could earn a special discount?) 

By rewarding loyal customers giving them something you have 3D printed yourself, you could see a big boost in your business. Show your customers a little appreciation in the form of a freebie and it’s a safe bet they will appreciate you right back. 

3. Offer Up Your Printer 

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It may seem strange to think about purchasing a 3D printer for your business especially if 3D printing doesn’t make much sense with your mission. But while 3D printing has a serious fan base in the general public a majority of people have never 3D printed before. 

Therefore it could be fun to offer your customers a chance to print something of their own with purchase. Let’s say you’re in the food or hospitality industry, you could have a promotion where if someone buys lunch they can also print something in 3D. 

There are many things you can 3D print in as little as 10 minutes which really isn’t that much time if you’re sitting down for a cup of coffee in a cafe. While this might seem a little gimmicky at first that 3D printer investment could pay off in a big way in drumming up customers and building interest in your business. 

4. Small Batch Manufacturing 

Even if you aren’t a manufacturing company, a 3D printer can be helpful to print a small inventory of what is needed. While of course there are large companies you can order pieces from it could be incredibly handy for your business to be able to print things you need on your own printer. 

Why would you keep paying for someone else to 3D print your stuff for you when you can do it yourself and save money? Think about whether having a printer can benefit your bottom line and save you time running around looking for things you can quickly print on your own. 

Especially if you find yourself in need of replacement parts frequently, you stand to benefit from printing your own. When you control the quality of the parts you need you can quickly get back to work instead of waiting for a replacement to arrive. 

5. Build A Little Farm  

Slowly we are going to start seeing 3D printing farms popping up the way of old school copy centers. As consumers start to see the benefits of 3D printing they are going to want in on the fun and see the technology for themselves. So it isn’t so far fetched to think you may want to offer customer’s the chance to print as needed by the public.

It would be an easy addition to many small businesses. Obviously, you can use the printers when needed as well, but when they aren’t in use for your prototypes you can set a pricing scale for those who would like to print. It’s a good way to earn some extra income and spread the love of 3D printing around. 

Conclusion: 

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Having a 3D printer for your business can be incredibly beneficial for both your own bottom line and your relationship with customers. No longer are 3D printers only for big businesses and factories. Make sure your small business doesn’t fall behind, consider how much 3D printing technology can help you succeed. 

Madeline Dudziak’s Bio:

Madeline Dudziak loves words. As a web content creator, she crafts messages that help clients inform, educate, persuade, or connect. Madeline’s also a freelance theater reviewer for the River Cities’ Reader, which combines her passion for writing with her passion for theatre. 

3D printing to build titanium bikes

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3D printing to build titanium bikes. According to The folks at Moots,” have been building gravel-focused bikes since 1981. In 1991, Moots went all-in on titanium frames and never looked back. Since then the methods for the building have evolved. They now include 3D-printed titanium parts, which Moots uses to push its frame design to new limits.”

From comments,
Simon Irvine
3 days ago
James Camden Engineering do the 3D Printing for Moots.

Christopher Wheeler
3 days ago (edited)
I love learning about small companies that are still significantly motivated by pride.

While their products will, by necessity, be more expensive, the experience of designing, constructing and owning something like that will almost certainly be more satisfying and meaningful, even if each of those steps takes longer to achieve.

The days of easy come, easy go, are ruining the planet and have already taken any sort of pride out of the process. I for one, congratulate Moots for doing their own work, and doing it with obvious care.

Hopefully, we can see more videos like this one from real manufacturers and not just business models that outsource. Thanks for the excellent video!

cerebellum
2 days ago
Anodizing explanation was slightly off, it’s not really about the shape of crystals. The different colours in this case are achieved by building up a very thin oxide layer. As light goes through the oxide layer and reflected by the material it gets bent slightly, just like when you look into water. Because the oxide layer is about the same thickness as the wavelengths of visible light, you get interference on certain wavelengths. Depending the thickness of the oxide layer, different wavelengths are affected by that interference so you get different colours.

Naturalhighz
3 days ago
Absolutely brilliant. would love nothing more than a costumized titanium bike! The fact that they’ve kept up with time and put disc brakes, more clearance for wider tyres is just fantastic. Can’t imagine a more enjoyable bike than those.

bdl 2
14 minutes ago
How long until we get a 3D printed Aero titanium Frame, I wonder…

How Moots uses 3D printing to build titanium bikes that last a lifetime

3D Printed spinal, chest implant

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According to Jani Nuolikoski, “I like all the new features. The new UI is looking nice and professional. All alignment tools for Fixed Scan are powerful and give completely new opportunities to speed up the scanning process in the field.“

SOUTH KOREA’S MANTIZ JOINS 3D PRINTED SPINAL IMPLANT MARKET

WorldSkills Kazan 2019

SHINING 3D and 3D Systems Partner to Release Geomagic® Essentials™

The 3D printers contribution to save the environment, with rebuilding ceramic corals reefs

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The 3D printer’s contribution to saving environment rebuilding ceramic corals reefs.
According to Ezri Tarazi, an industrial design professor at the Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, who is collaborating with other researchers from his university, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and Bar-Ilan University on the project, “As a diver, I was seeing the early signs of this five years ago. I was thinking, how can we take a reef that’s totally collapsing—which means there are no branches of corals anymore because they collapse, and fish cannot hide—and how can we reignite life in it? Because I’m an industrial designer, the idea to print corals was the first thing coming to mind.”

 

The 3D printers contribution to save the environment, with rebuilding ceramic corals reefs

ISRAELI RESEARCHERS ARE USING 3D PRINTING TECHNOLOGY TO HELP REBUILD CORAL REEFS 

 

Can we print a new set of coral reefs before they’re gone?

 

Johnston Uses 3D Printing to Meet Needs of Alzheimer’s Center Residents

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The chancellor of UAFS College of Applied Science and Technology’s 3D printing lab Dr. Terisa Riley and Methodist Village CEO Melissa Curry,” develop an initial set of 3D-printed nuts and bolts to aid residents’ cognitive stimulation.
The faculty at UAFS are deeply skilled, both as educators and as experts in their fields. It’s exciting to see our mission as a comprehensive regional institution fulfilled in their commitment to serving the citizens of the River Valley through innovative partnerships like these. When planning for our Alzheimer’s Special Care Community, we knew it was important to have the right sensory stimulation. They also mention We ordered life-like robotic cats and dogs for allergen-free pet therapy and installed interactive art throughout the halls.”

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Johnston Uses 3D Printing to Meet Needs of Alzheimer’s Center Residents

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Prellis Biologics has raised $8.7M

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According to Dr. Alex Morgan, Principal at Khosla Ventures and Dr. Melanie Matheu, Prellis Biologics’ co-founder and CEO, “Regenerative medicine has made enormous leaps in recent decades. However, to create complete organs, we need to build higher-order structures like the vascular system. Prellis’ optical technology provides the scaffolding necessary to engineer these larger masses of tissues. With our investment in Prellis, we’re supporting an initiative that will ultimately produce a functioning lobe of the lung, or even a kidney, to be used in addressing an enormous unmet global need.

The human tissue engineering is the ability to build complex tissues with working vascular systems. The future of regenerative medicine revolves around harnessing the power of our own cells as therapeutics and building the tissues to keep them alive. Khosla Ventures is the perfect investor to support our merging of deep tech and cutting-edge regenerative medicine. With this technology in hand, we can begin to ask questions about real 3D cell biology that have never been asked before.”

PRELLIS BIOLOGICS rings without background.png building life with light

EurekAlert! Science NewsA service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

Kijenzi is one of many ventures in the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship program that approaches real-world issues with Penn State know-how.