Biocompatibility tests for 3D printing

Prellis Biologics has raised $8.7M

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According to Dr. Alex Morgan, Principal at Khosla Ventures and Dr. Melanie Matheu, Prellis Biologics’ co-founder and CEO, “Regenerative medicine has made enormous leaps in recent decades. However, to create complete organs, we need to build higher-order structures like the vascular system. Prellis’ optical technology provides the scaffolding necessary to engineer these larger masses of tissues. With our investment in Prellis, we’re supporting an initiative that will ultimately produce a functioning lobe of the lung, or even a kidney, to be used in addressing an enormous unmet global need.

The human tissue engineering is the ability to build complex tissues with working vascular systems. The future of regenerative medicine revolves around harnessing the power of our own cells as therapeutics and building the tissues to keep them alive. Khosla Ventures is the perfect investor to support our merging of deep tech and cutting-edge regenerative medicine. With this technology in hand, we can begin to ask questions about real 3D cell biology that have never been asked before.”

https://www.prellisbio.com/

https://www.eurekalert.org/

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3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

https://www.psu.edu/feature/2018/06/18/3d-printing-purpose

3D printing and model helped to separate conjoined twins Safa and Marwa

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3D printing and model helped to separate conjoined twins Safa and Marwa.
According to Great Ormond Street Hospital and Charity, After consultation with their doctors in Pakistan, Great Ormond Street Hospital welcomed them to Bumblebee Ward in autumn 2018 and set about a four-month four-stage separation process involving multiple specialties across the hospital – from craniofacial, neurology and psychology experts, to nurses, radiologists, and physiotherapists”.

 

 

https://www.gosh.nhs.uk/

https://www.gosh.nhs.uk/news/separating-conjoined-twins

https://all3dp.com/4/conjoined-twins-separated-with-help-of-3d-printing/

The World’s Fastest Dental Model 3D Printer

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This is a guest contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop

Structo, Singapore-based dental 3D printer manufacturer partners with Ulab, a U.S.-based orthodontic treatment planning software developer to modernize the production of clear dental aligners. The two companies announced their partnership focused on supplying various segments of the market with their new dentistry solutions. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: www.structo3d.com

In the framework of the new project, Structo’s DentaForm 3D printer will be used together with the uLab uDesign treatment planning software to create aligner models. The 3D printer will become a part of the uLab’s uPrint ecosystem.

 Joe Breeland, chief commercial officer at uLab commented: “DentaForm’s high throughput capabilities of printing up to 10 arches in 30 minutes is exactly what existing uLab customers need to help them with their in-office aligner manufacturing.” 

The companies’ cooperation will also include working on additional solutions, such as Structo’s Velox desktop 3D printer and Structo Elements, a modular 3D printing system capable of printing up to 500 models per day.

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asDMnBZDXZg (Structo 3D)

“Our teams will also collaborate on new products that will involve the rest of our portfolio,” said a chief commercial officer at Structo, Dhruv Sahgal. “On top of our Velox desktop 3D printer, another exciting new solution that we are working on is an aligner specific module for our Elements automated and modular factory in a box.”

Structo introduced its first dental 3D printers back in 2014 – they were intended for building patient-specific devices and dental models. Structo’s proprietary technology MSLA (Mask Stereolithography) allows to print much faster than other SLA 3D printers. One of the key partners of the company is ClearCaps, a German clear dental aligner manufacturer. Last year, ClearCaps managed to produce 250 models per day with the DentaForm system.

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lE8TxgpXx9M (Structo 3D)

The new joint project involves the integration of the DentaForm system into the uLab platform that allows dentists to create digital models based on intraoral 3D digital scans of the patients. uLab allows orthodontists to quickly design treatment plans for aligners and create dental movement plans. The resulting 3D digital model can be exported directly to 3D printers in dental practitioner’s office. Since the software’s launch in summer of 2018, it was utilized in treatment of over 13,000 dental patients. 

Structo DentaForm is the seventh 3D printer integrated into the uLab platform. Others include Carbon M2; the Objet 500 and 260VS Dental selection from Stratasys; the Formlabs Form 2 and Vida and Micro XL from EnvisionTec. 

Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing

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Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing.
According to Angela Christiano, Ph.D., the Richard & Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, “Our previous studies implicated JAK-STAT signaling as one potential new therapeutic pathway for hair loss disorders by targeting hair follicle stem cells with JAK inhibitors. A biotech company recently reported results of a small phase 2 trial of a topical JAK-STAT inhibitor based on these studies. Here, we show that blocking the source of the JAK activating signal outside the hair follicle is another way to target this mechanism.”

 

 

https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/studies-uncover-new-approaches-combat-hair-loss-men-and-women

https://www.cuimc.columbia

Affordable 3D printed wheelchairs

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According to Brooke Thomas and David Calver, hosts of The Conversation, Affordable wheelchairs are changing lives in countries around the world.
According to some comments,
1 Wallace Wallaby,

“I’m a volunteer at an organization that 3d prints prosthetics for children recycled from plastic bottle tops. It’s pretty cool”.

2
Aaron Thompson,

“Love the effort and development that this guy is trying to build but I am skeptical that this is going to last. It seems that he 3d prints only some parts and a 3d printer produces a product with terrible strength and takes a ton of time and power to produce. Bolting simple parts together would be cheaper and repairable in the field”.

3
Steel Fox,

“I love me some 3D printing and I love his idea, but it is a terrible way to mass produce a product. If he was customizing each chair it would make sense. For something standardized molding would be better”.

4

bigraviolees,

“HE SHOULD team up with the guy who was mass producing lawn chairs to give to 3rd world poor folks who needed wheelchairs. He made an actual nice wheelchair in big numbers from lawn chairs and gets them out to people changing their lives”.

5

shutdafup,

“Take the zillions of tons of plastic bottles thrown away every year and mold them out of that the old fashioned way”.

6

Ed Roydlick,

“Should’ve 3D printed some wheelchair ramps as well”.

7

Tim Rox,

“Maybe they can even 3d print the tools too”.

 

https://www.participant.life/

3D printing helps reconstruct jaws

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According to the American National Cancer Institute, and Dr. Nguyễn Anh Khôi, deputy head of surgery department No.5 at the hospital, “Tobacco use, heavy alcohol use, and human papillomavirus increase the risk of these cancers.
Doctors decided to perform surgery to remove his lower jaw and reconstruct it using the 3D printing technology”.


Read more at http://vietnamnews.vn/society/520895/3d-printing-helps-reconstruct-jaws-for-cancer-patients-at-hcm-city-hospital.html#zl0Ocu9HCTER2zGC.99

 

https://vietnamnews.vn/society/520895/3d-printing-helps-reconstruct-jaws-for-cancer-patients-at-hcm-city-hospital.html#lgPRZJRvoekhMF7w.97

https://www.esmo.org/Patients/Designated-Centres-of-Integrated-Oncology-and-Palliative-Care/Ho-Chi-Minh-City-Oncology-Hospital-Vietnam

Students learn DNA inheritance, drones, and 3D printing at STEM summer camps

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As parents are looking for summer camp options for kids, many are considering STEM enrichment, with everything from robots, drones, media arts, 3-D printing, and Minecraft.  Be Greater Than Average offers more than 19 summer camps.

Source: Students learn DNA inheritance, drones, and 3D printing at STEM summer camps

3D Printing News Alert(3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties)

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3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties. The geometry of a moth’s eye provides inspiration for a 3D printed antenna that absorbs specific microwave frequencies from any direction.
According to Sameer Sonkusale, professor of electrical and computer engineering and Aydin Sadeqi, a graduate student in Sankusale’s lab at Tufts University’s School of Engineering who heads the Nano Lab at Tufts and is the corresponding author of the study, “The ability to consolidate functions using metamaterials could be incredibly useful. It’s possible that we could use these materials to reduce the size of spectrometers and other optical measuring devices so they can be designed for portable field study.
The full potential of 3D printing for MEGOs has not yet been realized. There is much more we can do with the current technology, and vast potential as 3D printing inevitably evolves”.

https://now.tufts.edu

3D Printing News Alert( Largest wood-based plastic 3D printer)

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According to the office of Sen. Susan Collins
A 3D printed representation of the state of Maine presented by Habib Dagher, executive director of UMaine’s Advanced Structures and Composites Center presented a 3D printed representation of Maine, “The material is nanocellulose, basically a tree ground up to its nanostructure. These materials have properties similar to metals,” Dagher said. “We are taking those and putting them in bioplastics so we can make very strong plastics that we can make almost anything with.”

3D Printing News Alert( Lung tissue bioprinting)

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According to bioengineers Jordan Miller of Rice University and Kelly Stevens of the University of Washington (UW) and included 15 collaborators from Rice, UW, Duke University, Rowan University and Nervous System, a design firm in Somerville, Massachusetts, assistant professor Miller from bioengineering at Rice’s Brown School of engineering,” one of the biggest roadblocks to generating functional tissue replacements has been our inability to print the complex vasculature that can supply nutrients to densely populated tissues. Further, our organs actually contain independent vascular networks — like the airways and blood vessels of the lung or the bile ducts and blood vessels in the liver. These interpenetrating networks are physically and biochemically entangled, and the architecture itself is intimately related to tissue function. Ours is the first bioprinting technology that addresses the challenge of multi vascularization in a direct and comprehensive way.”

https://news.rice.edu/2019/05/02/organ-bioprinting-gets-a-breath-of-fresh-air-2/?utm_source=Hero&utm_medium=organprint&utm_campaign=Hero%20Links