Biocompatibility tests for 3D printing

3D Printing For Cardiology

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According to Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director, structural heart imaging at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit,” explains how her center uses 3-D printing and computer-aided design (CAD) software to improve patient outcomes. She spoke to DAIC at the 2017 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting. ‘The Use of 3-D Printing in Cardiology’ and “Henry Ford Hospital Study Shows 3-D Imaging Improves Fixing Broken Hearts.”

According to Rob Beanlands, M.D., FASNC, 2019 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) president, shares a couple of trends he sees in cardiac nuclear imaging. He is the Vered Chair and division head of cardiology and director of the National Cardiac PET Centre at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada. He said,” overall trends he sees in nuclear cardiology include the use of better myocardial reserve quantification so it is clear whether revascularization would help patients. Beanlands also said there is increasing interest in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging because of its superior image quality and increasing access to PET radiotracers. New tracers on the horizon will also increase the image quality and flexibility of PET to accommodate exercise stress.”

 

The Future of 3-D Printing in Medicine

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer-Aided Design

VIDEO: Better Flow Quantification and Rise of PET Among Trends in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging

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3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

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According to A. Fatih Sarioglu, an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)“Isolating circulating tumor cells from whole blood samples has been a challenge because we are looking for a handful of cancer cells mixed with billions of normal red and white blood cells. With this device, we can process a clinically-relevant volume of blood by capturing nearly all of the white blood cells and then filtering out the red blood cells by size. That leaves us with undamaged tumor cells that can be sequenced to determine the specific cancer type and the unique characteristics of each patient’s tumor.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/628242/original

 

3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

3D bioprinting of tissues and organs

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According to Yehiel Tal, the Chief Executive Officer of CollPlant, “This fund raising is intended to support the advancement of our pipeline in the fields of medical aesthetics and 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. We are now focused on facilitating our development programs of dermal fillers and regenerative breast implants. Our collaboration with United Therapeutics, which is using our BioInk technology for 3D printing lungs, is progressing, and we continue to expand our business collaborations with large international healthcare companies that seek to implement our revolutionary regenerative medicine technology. We are very pleased to have entered into this transaction with Mr. Sagi and the other investors.”

 

CollPlant Biotechnologies Raising $5.5 Million

3D printed clear aligners

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3D printed clear aligners. According to Clinique Dentaire Casablanca, “The Invisalign system is a combination of proprietary virtual modeling software, rapid manufacturing processes, and mass customization, and virtually clear, removable appliances or “aligners” that are used to straighten teeth.”

From comments,

Andrew Thiyam
1 year ago
Can Invisalign also correct “Deepbite” to some extent??

CoChief Emeralds
9 months ago
I have those Invisalign trays for 8 more months

CoChief Emeralds
9 months ago
It took 8 to 10 weeks for my aligners to be ready because they had to do a quality check and all that good stuff let alone deciding if I need attachments on my teeth.

 

We use cutting-edge technology to manufacture best-in-class Clear Aligners

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3D printed a “rabbit-sized” heart

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According to BIOLIFE4D, “We have developed a proprietary bioink using a very specific composition of different extracellular matrix compounds that closely replicate the properties of the mammalian heart. Further, it has developed a novel and unique bioprinting algorithm, consisting of printing parameters optimized for the whole heart. Coupling its proprietary bioink with patient-derived cardiomyocytes and its enabling bioprinting technology, BIOLIFE4D is able to bioprint a heart that, while smaller in size, replicates many of the features of a human heart. With this platform technology in place, BIOLIFE4D is now well-positioned to build upon this platform and work towards the development of a full-scale human heart.”

 

BIOLIFE4D Just 3D Printed A Human ‘Mini-Heart’

BIOLIFE4D Reaches Groundbreaking Milestone and Successfully 3D Bioprints a Mini-Heart

https://english.tau.ac.il/

The better way to 3D print organs

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According to the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and co-first author Mark Skylar-Scott, Ph.D., a Research Associate at the Wyss Institute, “This is an entirely new paradigm for tissue fabrication. Rather than trying to 3D-print an entire organ’s worth of cells, SWIFT (sacrificial writing into functional tissue) )focuses on only printing the vessels necessary to support a living tissue construct that contains large quantities of OBBs, which may ultimately be used therapeutically to repair and replace human organs with lab-grown versions containing patients’ own cells.”

A Swifter Way Towards 3D-printed Organs

Latest Harvard Gazette News

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs

3D Printed spinal, chest implant

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According to Jani Nuolikoski, “I like all the new features. The new UI is looking nice and professional. All alignment tools for Fixed Scan are powerful and give completely new opportunities to speed up the scanning process in the field.“

SOUTH KOREA’S MANTIZ JOINS 3D PRINTED SPINAL IMPLANT MARKET

WorldSkills Kazan 2019

SHINING 3D and 3D Systems Partner to Release Geomagic® Essentials™

Prellis Biologics has raised $8.7M

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According to Dr. Alex Morgan, Principal at Khosla Ventures and Dr. Melanie Matheu, Prellis Biologics’ co-founder and CEO, “Regenerative medicine has made enormous leaps in recent decades. However, to create complete organs, we need to build higher-order structures like the vascular system. Prellis’ optical technology provides the scaffolding necessary to engineer these larger masses of tissues. With our investment in Prellis, we’re supporting an initiative that will ultimately produce a functioning lobe of the lung, or even a kidney, to be used in addressing an enormous unmet global need.

The human tissue engineering is the ability to build complex tissues with working vascular systems. The future of regenerative medicine revolves around harnessing the power of our own cells as therapeutics and building the tissues to keep them alive. Khosla Ventures is the perfect investor to support our merging of deep tech and cutting-edge regenerative medicine. With this technology in hand, we can begin to ask questions about real 3D cell biology that have never been asked before.”

PRELLIS BIOLOGICS rings without background.png building life with light

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3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

Kijenzi is one of many ventures in the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship program that approaches real-world issues with Penn State know-how.