Biocompatibility tests for 3D printing

The first 3D-printed human corneas

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As reported by Experimental Eye Research, ” how stem cells (human corneal stromal cells) from a healthy donor cornea were mixed together with alginate and collagen to create a solution that could be printed, a ‘bio-ink’.

Using a simple low-cost 3D bio-printer, the bio-ink was successfully extruded in concentric circles to form the shape of a human cornea. It took less than 10 minutes to print.”

On the authority of Che Connon, Professor of Tissue Engineering at Newcastle University, who led the work, “Many teams across the world have been chasing the ideal bio-ink to make this process feasible.
Our unique gel – a combination of alginate and collagen – keeps the stem cells alive whilst producing a material which is stiff enough to hold its shape but soft enough to be squeezed out the nozzle of a 3D printer.
This builds upon our previous work in which we kept cells alive for weeks at room temperature within a similar hydrogel. Now we have a ready to use bio-ink containing stem cells allowing users to start printing tissues without having to worry about growing the cells separately.”

Newcastle University

First 3D printed human corneas

Scientists create the first 3D-printed human corneas

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$20 Million in a Series A Funding for 3D Bioprinting of Human Tissue

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According to Sam Davies, “We are developing a new wave of solutions that have the potential to transform how we heal injury and disease.”

According to Tamer Mohamed, CEO, Aspect Biosystems, “We are thrilled to close this important institutional financing round with a group of world-class investors who believe in our bold vision. This funding speaks to the power of our technology and strategy in addressing multiple applications in therapeutic discovery and regenerative medicine, and will allow us to accelerate internal innovation and expand our global partnerships. With our technology platform, interdisciplinary team of scientists and engineers, and leading collaborators, we are developing a new wave of solutions that have the potential to transform how we heal injury and disease.”

According to Jordan Jacobs, managing partner, Radical Ventures, “We are very excited to partner with the excellent Aspect team to support the growth of their world-leading 3D bioprinting platform and the development of breakthrough technologies aimed at radically transforming human health.

 

Aspect Biosystems raises $20m in Series A funding

Aspect Biosystems

ASPECT BIOSYSTEMS ANNOUNCES US $20 MILLION SERIES A FINANCING TO ADVANCE ITS LEADING PLATFORM FOR 3D BIOPRINTING OF HUMAN TISSUE

Carbon – President and CEO

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Carbon Appoints Ellen Kullman President and CEO, Dr. Joseph DeSimone Named Executive Chairman.
According to Kullman, “Today’s announcement is a great honor, I am privileged to have spent the last few years on the Carbon board working alongside Joe, one of the greatest entrepreneurs and scientists of our time. Joe has built Carbon into the world’s leading digital manufacturing platform, and as President and CEO of Carbon, I am excited to partner with Joe and build on the solid foundations he’s put into place.
According to Dr. DeSimone, “For the last six years, I have led Carbon as Chief Executive Officer and am enormously proud of what we’ve accomplished during my tenure. I know what we will accomplish under Ellen will be even more extraordinary. Ellen is the right person to lead Carbon today. She has broad experience across multiple businesses, cycles, and geographies. Her vision, outstanding leadership traits, and distinguished track record will continue to drive Carbon’s growth into the future. In assuming the Executive Chairman role, I will be able to focus on evangelizing the platform and driving adoption more widely.”

 

Carbon Appoints Ellen Kullman President and CEO, Dr. Joseph DeSimone Named Executive Chairman

India’s first metal 3D printing machine

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India’s first metal 3D printing machine. According to vice president and Business Head, Wipro 3D Ajay Parikh, “The country’s first Electron Beam melting powder bed fusion 3D printer, symbolizes Wipro 3D’s constant effort to indigenize, expand and industrialize additive technology.”

Indian Institute of Science

3D Printing: Revolutionizing Healthcare

Wipro collaborates with IISc for advanced research and innovation in autonomous systems, robotics and 5

Wipro 3D develops India’s first metal 3D printing machine with IISc

3D-printed bunny contains DNA

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According to the teams of Robert Grass at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich and Yaniv Erlich at Erlich Lab, a DNA storage company in Israel, “One day he [Erlich] wrote an email – ‘Hey, what if we put real information into your object? That would be really cool,’” 3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself. Using the information, researchers have replicated the rabbit several times, highlighting the potential for using DNA to store information in everyday objects.”

This Plastic Bunny is Filled With Artificial DNA. The Data Inside: More Bunnies

3D-printed bunny contains DNA instructions to make a copy of itself Read more

A DNA-of-things storage architecture to create materials with embedded memory

BRECA Health Care

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According to BRECA Health Care,” is a biomedical engineering company that uses 3D printing technologies, computer aided design, reverse engineering and computational validation in order to develop state of the art custom made products and solutions in the healthcare sector. We are pioneers in the development of 3D bioprinting systems that are fundamental for the community of research in the development of new pharmaceuticals and advanced therapies. We are proud to say that we are helping to shape the future of medicine.”

BRECA Health Care

3D Printing For Cardiology

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According to Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director, structural heart imaging at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit,” explains how her center uses 3-D printing and computer-aided design (CAD) software to improve patient outcomes. She spoke to DAIC at the 2017 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting. ‘The Use of 3-D Printing in Cardiology’ and “Henry Ford Hospital Study Shows 3-D Imaging Improves Fixing Broken Hearts.”

According to Rob Beanlands, M.D., FASNC, 2019 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) president, shares a couple of trends he sees in cardiac nuclear imaging. He is the Vered Chair and division head of cardiology and director of the National Cardiac PET Centre at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada. He said,” overall trends he sees in nuclear cardiology include the use of better myocardial reserve quantification so it is clear whether revascularization would help patients. Beanlands also said there is increasing interest in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging because of its superior image quality and increasing access to PET radiotracers. New tracers on the horizon will also increase the image quality and flexibility of PET to accommodate exercise stress.”

 

The Future of 3-D Printing in Medicine

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer-Aided Design

VIDEO: Better Flow Quantification and Rise of PET Among Trends in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging

3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

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According to A. Fatih Sarioglu, an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)“Isolating circulating tumor cells from whole blood samples has been a challenge because we are looking for a handful of cancer cells mixed with billions of normal red and white blood cells. With this device, we can process a clinically-relevant volume of blood by capturing nearly all of the white blood cells and then filtering out the red blood cells by size. That leaves us with undamaged tumor cells that can be sequenced to determine the specific cancer type and the unique characteristics of each patient’s tumor.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/628242/original

 

3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

3D bioprinting of tissues and organs

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According to Yehiel Tal, the Chief Executive Officer of CollPlant, “This fund raising is intended to support the advancement of our pipeline in the fields of medical aesthetics and 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. We are now focused on facilitating our development programs of dermal fillers and regenerative breast implants. Our collaboration with United Therapeutics, which is using our BioInk technology for 3D printing lungs, is progressing, and we continue to expand our business collaborations with large international healthcare companies that seek to implement our revolutionary regenerative medicine technology. We are very pleased to have entered into this transaction with Mr. Sagi and the other investors.”

 

CollPlant Biotechnologies Raising $5.5 Million