Advanced Materials Technologies

The 3D printing a healthier world for everybody

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According to Materialise,” 3D printing is a slow revolution. But it is a revolution regardless when you consider what the technology does: saving lives, enabling new business models, redefining how we design products. But none of that happened overnight. The revolutionary nature of 3D printing grew over the decades, formed on a foundation of small but valuable steps.”

 

 

https://www.materialise.com/en/medical

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Jabil’s plan for $42M medical 3D printing with 24 percent core EPS growth

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According to St. Petersburg-based Jabil (NYSE: JBL),” is set to make a $42 million investment in Albuquerque, New Mexico for technology and equipment as it makes the Duke City its “center of excellence” for 3D printing, officials announced on Aug. 15. The company said it plans to hire 120 employees in the next five years.”
According to New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said in a statement “We have all the talent in the world right here in New Mexico, and when we build the infrastructure for a 21st-century economy, we will see more young adults stay here and more homegrown talent return here.”
According to CEO Mark Mondello, “I’m extremely pleased with our third-quarter performance, highlighted by solid operational excellence and strong financial results. The team delivered 20 basis points of core margin expansion on double-digit revenue growth, culminating in an impressive 24 percent core EPS growth, year-over-year. Our strong year-to-date results validate that our diversification strategy has firmly taken hold.”

Delivering insoles in 1/2 the time, at a fraction of the cost.

https://www.jabil.com/capabilities/3d-printing.html

https://www.jabil.com/

https://www.jabil.com/capabilities/medical-device-mechatronics.html

https://www.jabil.com/news/jabil-unveils-plans-for–42m-medical-3d-printing-center-of-excel.html

Jabil unveils plans for $42M medical 3D printing center of excellence

https://www.owler.com/reports/jabil/jabil–florida-manufacturing-giant-announces-plans/1565907397761

https://www.bizjournals.com/orlando/news/2019/08/16/florida-manufacturing-giant-announces-plans-to.html?

What kind of Problems with LCD Resin 3D Printers. Different ways to fix it? Safety features.

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What is your comment?

Please read safety things before using anything –
It is hazardous and it may give you an allergic reaction that you really don’t want (been there still got the skin problem) but it’s not toxic or sometimes it can be. Respiratory Irritation
Breathing highly concentrated epoxy vapor can irritate the respiratory system and cause sensitization. Serious health problems can result from sanding epoxy before it is fully cured. When you inhale these dust particles, they become trapped in the mucous lining of your respiratory system. Because it can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation. And dust from polyurethane resin is highly toxic.
The pure epoxy resins are considered as non-toxic, the risk of damage caused by ingestion of epoxy resin can be considered as very small. Most curing agents in use today have certain toxicity. Inhalation of epoxy resins causes no problems as they are not volatile.
The difference is that SLA works by flashing a laser — a tiny dot of concentrated light — across a given area to harden it and create a layer. In contrast, DLP machines cure all areas of a layer simultaneously, by projecting light onto the resin in the shape of that layer.
We can use liquid resin to produce 3D prints. Since we are dealing with a liquid material, an additional support structure is necessary for overhanging parts and cavities. The average 3D printer material cost for standard SLA resins is approximately $50 per liter. That means entry-level, cheap resins may even be under $50. MakerJuice offers a standard resin for SLA 3D printing, which costs $58 per liter.
Many resins are actually quite toxic, and we wrote on this some time ago. … However, remember that some resins ARE safe, it’s just that many are not – and they should be treated appropriately. The second issue with resin 3D printing is curing, the process that makes the resin solid.

Comments from video,
Luis Rios
1 day ago
The LCD screen is a consumable item and it is not covered by the warranty on most manufacturers. They are not meant to last forever although I have found that they are very sensitive. You need to strain the resin after every print as any dried resin that is left in the vat will damage the pixels when the next print starts.
Luis Rios
22 hours ago
@ualdayan I have six resin printers and have been through the rounds. The LCD screen is a consumable. That has been stated to me directly by the manufacturers. If you read the fine print in the warranty you will see that stated as well. The life expectancy of an LCD screen is supposed to be close to 800 hours. I have never gotten close to that.
CHEP
18 hours ago
Great information. LCDs tend to be very temperature sensitive so maybe that is an issue.

StevesPropShop
1 day ago
As stated by others below, this is to do with UV Exposure and heat. Be wary of ‘high speed’ resins. They have a higher exothermic reaction rate which can also damage the LCD. Using an infrared thermometer i tested ‘AmeraLabs’ AMD-3 LED resin which is a super fast cure resin (2.5 sec per layer at 0.03) and it was curing at nearly 54 degrees Celsius on my mars. When the LCD’s are made they are supposed to have a UV filter film added to lengthen their lifespan which obviously they can’t do for these printers. I’ve had screens last months and screens last weeks. Theres nothing you can do to really affect it other than use standard curing resins that don’t give off as much heat and make sure you do usual checks to make sure your vat and build plate are clean etc etc.
zemerick13
15 hours ago
@Dean Rockne As someone that has built PCs…often quieter fans are the better ones actually. Better bearings, lower turbulence, more efficient…all of these make the fan quieter for the same or better cooling.
If heating manages to be a problem, it’d be nearly instant spot heating…which would be practically impossible to cool. Basically, you’d need to chill the resin in the reservoir so that any temperature increase is offset…and I don’t think the resin would respond too well to that. You’re supposed to keep them at room temperature.
Redemptioner1
13 hours ago (edited)
It’s a simple problem, the screens are not designed to work with the UV light, product of cheap printers they use cheap screens. You are looking at over $1000USD wholesale for a screen rated for the UV light to fit these printers, that’s a lot of $30 screen replacements

Sand 3D Printer before and now

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According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
Category
7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

https://www.sculpteo.com/blog/2019/07/17/is-a-sand-3d-printer-the-future-of-additive-manufacturing/?

3D-printable magnetic Droplets devices

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According to a team of scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), “Scientists Print 3D-printable liquid magnetic droplets devices.
This is a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. Their findings could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.”
According to Tom Russell, a visiting faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab and professor of polymer science and engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “We’ve made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic. No one has ever observed this before. This opens the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter.”

 

New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets

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https://www.massachusetts.edu/

3D printing startup company Fortify raises $10 million

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The Fortify was founded on research on composite 3D printing by Randall Erb and Joshua Martin at Northeastern University. Their goal was to enable quick and seamless fabrication of composites with optimized microstructures. Through their research, they invented magnetic 3D printing or Fluxprint.
Fluxprint makes high-performance materials accessible. It’s a patented magnetic 3D printing process that creates optimized composites.
Fluxprint combines magnetics and digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing to produce composite parts with ideal mechanical properties”.

https://www.northeastern.edu/

Home

What is Fluxprint?

Industrial 3D printing startup Fortify raises $10 million

Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component

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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component. The three-year project has received additional support from the University of Pittsburgh ($200,600), resulting in a total grant of $1,003,000.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry today announced that the Department of Energy will award 113 grants totaling $121 million to 103 small businesses in 29 states.

According to Albert and Dr.Xiayun (Sharon) Zhao, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt, “LPBF AM is capable of making complex metal components with the reduced cost of material and time. There is a desire to employ the appealing AM technology to fabricate sophisticated HGPTCs that can withstand higher working temperature for next-generation turbines. However, because there’s a possibility that the components will have porous defects and be prone to detrimental thermomechanical fatigue, it’s critical to have a good quality assurance method before putting them to use. The quality assurance framework we are developing will immensely reduce the cost of testing and quality control and enhance confidence in adopting the LPBF process to fabricate demanding HGPTCs.”

 

 

https://www.engineering.pitt.edu/News/2019/DOE-Grant-for-3D-Printed-Turbine-Components/

Supersonic Jet’s Nanoscale Additive Manufacturing

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Supersonic Jet’s Nanoscale Additive Manufacturing. According to professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology Andrei Fedorov,” we are controlling matter on the atomic scale to bring about new modes of additive manufacturing. This new science could bring about additive manufacturing applications that might otherwise be impossible. The resulting new technology will open up new dimensions for additive manufacturing at the atomic scale.
When we went to the lab to use nanofabrication with focused electron beams, which are the size of a few nanometers, we could not grow structures that were just a few nanometers. They grew to be 50 or 100 nanometers. And it also took a long time to produce the structures, which meant that, without improvements, we’d never be able to produce them at high volume.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/622941/original

 

 

https://www.machinedesign.com/3d-printing/supersonic-gas-speeds-nanoscale-3d-printing

https://www.news.gatech.edu/2019/07/02/tiny-supersonic-jet-injector-accelerates-nanoscale-additive-manufacturing

ExOne and Siemens Digital Industries partnership for 3D printing

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According to Dr. Karsten Heuser, Vice President of Additive Manufacturing at Siemens Digital Industries and ExOne CEO John Hartner, “With this expanded partnership, ExOne will deliver even more value to our foundry and manufacturing customers who rely on our industrial3D printers. We are proud to be the first industrial 3D printer to fully integrate the latest of Siemens control, sensing and motion technologies and this new MindSphere technology, which will give our customers a new level of control and plant integration.”

We are proud to further strengthen our partnership with ExOne and advance the industrialization of additive manufacturing. Siemens brings new digital technologies and its profound industrial domain know-how to help ExOne generate further value. The new ExOne S-Max Pro™3D printer proves that seamlessly integrated software and automation solutions result in shorter time-to-market, higher performance, and maximum availability.”

 

https://www.exone.com/en-US/News/ExOne-and-Siemens-Partner-to-Bring-Industry-4-(1)

https://www.siemens.com

Is 3D printing worth it?

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Is 3D printing worth it? According to, Marius Hornberger “A few real-world workshop examples that make use of 3D-printing.
I hate how 3D printers are always advertised with the things they can make. Mostly figures or models of stuff that just looks cool in the first moment, but very few people actually need that.
That’s why I didn’t want to dive into 3D printing for some time. Since I then had access to the printer of my dad I came up with a few things that actually make good use of a printer for the workshop.
The materials I used were PLA and PETG. Everything that was white was PETG and the rest was PLA.
I use SolidWorks for designing.”

According to comments from the video,”

  • Yes, you can make parts that don’t exist and make replacement parts for existing equipment.
  • Sometimes you seem like a wise old guy who’s been around precision workshops for decades, passing on your skills to the youngsters in the audience. I’m 74 years old and enjoy being one of the youngsters. Those endless examples of your high-quality design & 3D printing had me captivated.
    -It was one of the best videos about practical 3d printed parts. Great job!
  • Genius use of 3D printing. Really inspiring!
  • My 3D printer is my favorite woodworking tool. You demonstrated excellent use of it. Your designs are well thought out and I can tell you’ve spent some time on them. Well done!
  • An excellent video highlighting practical uses of 3D Printers.
  • the biggest negative on 3d printing is time. granted you don’t have to sit there watching the printer doing its job but you still need to keep an eye on it in case something fails and I don’t have a good feeling about letting a machine work for that long all alone. other than that, I love my 3d printer a lot, even though it’s only a cheap version of the original i3, it still produces reasonable prints.
  • Awesome work, I also have a 3d printer (mk3 and MK2s) and a workshop. I’ve made dovetail templates, corner clamps, screw boxes, drilling templates and more. Your designs are really good, I love the chamfer interlock system you designed for the connections. Is that all in PLA.”

Please tell us what is your opinion:)

 

 

 

 

https://www.xyzprinting.com/en-US/material/petg

Original Prusa i3 MK3

3D printing and origami

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3D printing and origami. According to Arnav Wagh, “he created ‘FLXO’ as a tool to explore soft-robotics these four actuators work is inspired by origami. They work as soft engines for a given mechanism. They are entirely 3D printed on a conventional desktop printer.”

 

 

<iframe title=”vimeo-player” src=”https://player.vimeo.com/video/344986189″ width=”640″ height=”360″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen></iframe>

https://www.designboom.com/tag/robots/