4D print self-transformation

Dr. 4D printer (4D printing Programmable Wood)

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Dr. 4D printer is informing us what is good and what is not good, 4D printing’s Programmable wood.

Meri asked about 4D printing wood, “is this 100% wood? concerns: are 3d and 4d printing materials biodegradable, earth-friendly, environmentally friendly and safe for people during use and production of items made by the 3d and 4d printing? I read at the University California Irvine facebook that student(s) are having to build something extra to help with the fume created during 3d printing. The fumes can be very bad for health as we inhale and surround ourselves in the fume during production and into the environment…air and so on…which then rains into the land, wildlife, river, and ocean contributing to global warming and destruction of the planet just to have accumulation of stuff…for joy and happiness of people. it could be like second hand smoking…what about other people in the planet and other animals and fish and the entire earth?? why should we all suffer needlessly for the joy of those who print excessively just to have stuff”.

For this comment. We still don’t have sufficient answer. 4D printing still in research stage.

I am sure in future we will use 4D printing more often.:)

 

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Dr. 3d Printer (3D Printing? 4D Printing? 5D Printing)

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Jesse Harrington, Autodesk’s Maker in chief talk about 5D Printing at International CES. Technology is improving day by day. We know about 3D, 4D, and now 5D printing.

Jesse Harrington tell us how they are “upleveling” 3D printing.

3D / 4D printing inflatable structure

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Nottingham Trent University  in Nottingham, England.

Professor Philip Breedon’s research interests and latest projects center on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilization of ‘’ smart materials for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals. research interests and latest projects center on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilisation of ‘smart materials’ for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals.His research interests and latest projects centre on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilisation of ‘smart materials’ for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals.

https://www.ntu.ac.uk/staff-profiles/architecture-design-built-environment/philip-breedon

4D printed’ material

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is in Livermore California.

Researchers from the laboratory, add hollow gas-filled “micro-balloons” into silicone-based ink, the researchers engineered the material so it can be compressed or “programmed” at an elevated temperature, remaining in that state as it cools. When reheated, the gas in the micro-balloons expands, causing the structures to return to their original shape. When combined with 3D printing, this shape memory behavior is often referred to as “4D printing,” with the fourth dimension being time.

“The impressive part was how well the structures could recover their shape after they were reheated,” said LLNL researcher Amanda Wu, the lead author. “We didn’t see a distorted structure, we saw a fully recovered structure. Because the silicone network is completely cross-linked, it holds the part together, so the structure recovers its original shape in a predictable, repeatable way.”

In the beginning, the process was an accelerated aging test to see if the material would be useful. 4D printing took on a pretty large compression set and that made them think if it was permanent. We weren’t really thrilled about that, but researchers tried to see if it could recover its shape when heated. They tested it and it was a successful experiment.

https://www.llnl.gov/news/lab-researchers-achieve-4d-printed-material