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3D Printing News Alert(For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene)

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Graphene is strong, light, thin and flexible. It is the thinnest substance capable of conducting electricity, is an efficient thermal conductor and is optically transparent. Graphene is also more resistant to tearing than steel and is almost impermeable.

For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene.

According to GrapheneCa Head of Business Development David Robles,” Proactive Investors to discuss the technology company that is integrating graphene into the real world using their own environmentally friendly production process.

Robles telling Proactive about the company’s revenue streams and when they are expecting to be profitable.”

According to Hodge,” Adding graphene to plastic composites can improve the tensile strength and stiffness of packaging. Graphene won’t make the material indestructible but it may be possible to reduce packaging size while maintaining the same properties. This has obvious advantages for transporting fragile goods and may also contribute to recycling. Today, recycling plastics degrades the quality of the plastic – it can be recycled an average of three times, but adding graphene to recycled plastics can improve its strength so that it can be recycled many times more. Because they are printed, [the capacitive touch sensors] can be any size or shape and printed in volume.”

According to Chris Jones, technical manager at Novalia, a partner in the EU’s Graphene Flagship, “Our mission statement is to make technology disappear into everyday items.
The ink is supplied by Researchers at the University of Cambridge, University of Manchester and produced by micro fluidization.”

According to Francesca Rosella, co-founder of CuteCircuit, “A dress was designed to illustrate the material’s strength, transparency, and conductivity. The shape and decoration of the dress represent the design of a graphene crystal. We examined graphene under a microscope to see the hexagonal structure and enlarged it to help people understand graphene’s molecular structure.”

According to the TechRadar, “Mobile warming the graphene jacket can also conduct electricity, but creator Vollebak has decided to dampen down this ability to protect wearers. Prototypes of the jacket were so conductive that the wearer could hold a battery in one hand and a light bulb in the other, and have the bulb light up, but Vollebak decided that, although interesting, it was best to play it safe and make the material a little more resistant.”

According to Researchers at Osaka Universities co-author Kazuhiko Matsumoto,” Our biosensor enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of bacteria that cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer by limiting its reaction in a well-defined microvolume. They have invented a new biosensor using graphene, which is a material that consists of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to detect bacteria like those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact with the biosensor, chemical reactions are triggered which are detected by graphene. To enable detection of the chemical reaction products, the researchers used microfluidics to contain the bacteria in tiny droplets that are close to the surface of the sensor.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2qz

 

https://youtu.be/IesIsKMjB4Y

 

 

https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2019/06/graphene-what-is-it-good-for/

https://www.techradar.com/news/with-this-graphene-jacket-youll-never-be-too-hot-too-cold-or-too-smelly

https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/22914/20190622/using-graphene-and-tiny-droplets-to-detect-stomach-cancer-causing-bacteria.htm

3D printed roller coaster

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According to Matt Schmotzer, “a systems engineers at Ford Motor Co. brings a functional, scaled-down, iconic roller coaster replicas
to life with SOLIDWORKS.
The functional roller coaster replica will be running and on display at SOLIDWORKS World 2019 in Dallas.
“I had to manually hand-splice together all of the track sections on Invertigo, which took about three weeks. On Batman the Ride, there are 86 sections of track, more than double that of Invertigo. So, I worked with my wife, a computer scientist, to combine a series a macro with an executable file that she created in Microsoft Visual Studio® to automate the track-splicing process. What used to take three weeks of manual effort on Invertigo is now just a button click on Batman the Ride. I’ve also increased the number of 3D printers that I utilize from six to 10″.

https://sww.solidworks.com/solidworks-world-2019/?kui=SqUd_sLV4bxTRrm3buPOgA#_ts=1547676483566

Dr. 3d Printer (3D printers Server Octoprint vs Repetier comparison)

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According to Ron Place, he is our Dr for Dr. 3D Printer (3D printers Server Octoprint vs Repetier comparison),” This is the video showing a comparison between Octoprint and Repetier Server. They are both great alternatives”.:)

 

https://octoprint.org/

https://wp.me/p64ptu-1R1

 

Giant F1 Car Is 3D Printed and Radio Controlled

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The OpenRC F1 car is a radio control car you can 3D print and assemble yourself. You make the parts, glue them together, and then add your RC gear. That’s all well and good, but could it be done… bigger? [3D Printing Nerd] decided to tackle this one at 4x scale. It goes without saying that this took some work. The model has to be carved up into sections that would actually fit on the printers to hand. This can take some planning to ensure the parts still come out nicely, as they may be printed in different orientations or …read more

via Giant F1 Car Is 3D Printed and Radio Controlled — Hackaday

3DPrint360: Providing Affordable Access to 3D Printers

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3DPrint360: Providing Affordable Access to 3D Printers

According to the 3DPrint360,” it is a New York-based startup that aims to provide affordable access to 3D printers for schools, homes, and businesses.  3DPrint360 provides access to new, refurbished, and used 3d printers as well as 3D printing materials, installation and servicing agreements related to 3D printers.

3DPrint360 works with schools to ensure that they procure the right 3d printers, materials and tools for their needs.  They provide schools with a dedicated installation and maintenance agent that provides any needed support and maintenance help. For people who are not ready to purchase and own a 3D printer, 3DPrint360 provides access to 3D printer rentals (presently for customers in Tri-State area).

According to Zach Lichaa, Founder and CEO of 3DPrint360 “It is our simple belief that more interaction with 3d printing will positively affect industry, education, the environment and society as a whole. Accordingly, we work every day to provide knowledgeable, affordable and welcoming access to the technology for our clients around the world”.:)

 

http://www.3dprint360.biz/

3DPrint360 Brings 3D Printing Full-Circle with Used 3D Printer Marketplace

MIT Develops Platform for 3D Printing Glass

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MIT Develops Platform for 3D Printing Glass

Mediated Matter Group of MITs’ Media Lab in collaboration with MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and MIT’s Glass Lab has developed an additive manufacturing platform called G3DP for printing transparent glass structures.  The G3DP platform uses two chambers, an upper chamber and a lower chamber.  The upper chamber is heated to a temperature of 1900°F to produce molten glass.  The lower chamber performs annealing by slowly cooling the molten glass.  The molten glass is funneled through a nozzle to 3D print fascinating glass structures.

According to Prof. Neri Oxman of the MIT Media Lab who directs the Mediated Matter research group, this research could lead to advances in creating fiber optic cables that transmit data more efficiently.

https://www.media.mit.edu/people/neri

http://matter.media.mit.edu/

https://www.media.mit.edu/research/groups/mediated-matter

https://wp.me/p64ptu-4d

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/pdfplus/10.1089/3dp.2015.0021