Best 3D Printing Universities

3D Printing News Alert(For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene)

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Graphene is strong, light, thin and flexible. It is the thinnest substance capable of conducting electricity, is an efficient thermal conductor and is optically transparent. Graphene is also more resistant to tearing than steel and is almost impermeable.

For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene.

According to GrapheneCa Head of Business Development David Robles,” Proactive Investors to discuss the technology company that is integrating graphene into the real world using their own environmentally friendly production process.

Robles telling Proactive about the company’s revenue streams and when they are expecting to be profitable.”

According to Hodge,” Adding graphene to plastic composites can improve the tensile strength and stiffness of packaging. Graphene won’t make the material indestructible but it may be possible to reduce packaging size while maintaining the same properties. This has obvious advantages for transporting fragile goods and may also contribute to recycling. Today, recycling plastics degrades the quality of the plastic – it can be recycled an average of three times, but adding graphene to recycled plastics can improve its strength so that it can be recycled many times more. Because they are printed, [the capacitive touch sensors] can be any size or shape and printed in volume.”

According to Chris Jones, technical manager at Novalia, a partner in the EU’s Graphene Flagship, “Our mission statement is to make technology disappear into everyday items.
The ink is supplied by Researchers at the University of Cambridge, University of Manchester and produced by micro fluidization.”

According to Francesca Rosella, co-founder of CuteCircuit, “A dress was designed to illustrate the material’s strength, transparency, and conductivity. The shape and decoration of the dress represent the design of a graphene crystal. We examined graphene under a microscope to see the hexagonal structure and enlarged it to help people understand graphene’s molecular structure.”

According to the TechRadar, “Mobile warming the graphene jacket can also conduct electricity, but creator Vollebak has decided to dampen down this ability to protect wearers. Prototypes of the jacket were so conductive that the wearer could hold a battery in one hand and a light bulb in the other, and have the bulb light up, but Vollebak decided that, although interesting, it was best to play it safe and make the material a little more resistant.”

According to Researchers at Osaka Universities co-author Kazuhiko Matsumoto,” Our biosensor enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of bacteria that cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer by limiting its reaction in a well-defined microvolume. They have invented a new biosensor using graphene, which is a material that consists of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to detect bacteria like those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact with the biosensor, chemical reactions are triggered which are detected by graphene. To enable detection of the chemical reaction products, the researchers used microfluidics to contain the bacteria in tiny droplets that are close to the surface of the sensor.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2qz

 

https://youtu.be/IesIsKMjB4Y

 

 

https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2019/06/graphene-what-is-it-good-for/

https://www.techradar.com/news/with-this-graphene-jacket-youll-never-be-too-hot-too-cold-or-too-smelly

https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/22914/20190622/using-graphene-and-tiny-droplets-to-detect-stomach-cancer-causing-bacteria.htm

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3D Printing News Alert(3d printed diamond)

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A Swedish engineering group has 3D printed the world’s first composite diamond.
According to Mikael Schuisky, Head of R&D and Operations at Sandvik Additive Manufacturing, and RAPID + TCT show in Detroit, “Diamond is harder than anything else in nature. It is a key component in a large range of wear resistant tools in the industry, but since it’s so hard and complicated to machine it is almost impossible to form complex shapes. To solve this, Sandvik has developed a proprietary process making it possible to 3D print diamond composite, meaning that this super-hard material now can be printed in highly complex shapes – and can thereby revolutionize the way industries use the hardest natural material on the planet.
We now have the ability to create strong diamond composites in very complex shapes through additive manufacturing, which fundamentally will change the way industries will be able to use this material. As of now, the only limit to how this super-hard material can be shaped and used is down to the designer’s imagination.
According to Susanne Norgren, Adjunct Professor in Applied Materials Science at Uppsala University, “Sandvik’s 3D printed diamond composite is a true innovation. It means that we can begin to use diamond in applications and shapes never conceived possible before. Just imagine what it could do to industries, when it is possible to print anything, in any shape – in the diamond.”

https://www.home.sandvik/en/news-and-media

https://www.additive.sandvik/diamond

https://www.uu.se/en

3D printed cellulose sensors

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According to the professor Woo Soo Kim in the School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering, “Our eco-friendly 3D printed cellulose sensors can wirelessly transmit data during their life, and then can be disposed of without concern of environmental contamination. This development will help to advance green electronics. For example, the waste from printed circuit boards is a hazardous source of contamination to the environment. If we are able to change the plastics in PCB to cellulose composite materials, recycling of metal components on the board could be collected in a much easier way.”

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/2199160x/current

3-D printing with Cellulose

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According to John Hart and Sebastian Pattinson, a former postdoc in mechanical engineering who is now a lecturer at the University of Cambridge in the U.K., “demonstrated a technique using the world’s most abundant natural polymer-cellulose. at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. They are very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and they are proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing.
Cellulose offers many advantages over current plastics-based feedstocks: It’s inexpensive, renewable, biodegradable, mechanically robust, and chemically versatile. In addition, it’s widely used in pharmaceuticals, packaging, clothing, and a variety of other products, many of which could be customized using 3-D printing”.

 

http://mit.edu/

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http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-researchers-accelerating-3d-printing-using-renewable-materials-1129

3D printed Beehive

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For so many decades we couldn’t find the identification of colony collapse disorder, a phenomenon marked by widespread loss of honey bee colonies, researchers are continuously working to solve the ecologically complex problem of how to mitigate ongoing losses of honey bees and other pollinating species. We need to track specific impacts on bee health. It could be carefully controlled and kept pesticide free.
3D printed honeycomb is based on food grade material.

 

According to Researchers at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology at the University of Illinois and J Group Robotics,” used specially developed 3D-printed plastic honeycombs that mimic the hive environment, in order to monitor queen egg-laying behaviors. They develop a complete Automated Bee Hive to extract honey in the purest form. The entire beehive is nature-friendly as well as using the latest Robotics, 3D Printing & Production friendly mechanism. The Robotic Bee Hive shall extract the purest form of Honey without Killing or Disturbing the Honey Bees. “This compact Robotics Bee Hive shall be installed at every village driving the Women Empowerment and supplying the Purest form of Kinds of honey to the FMCG’s”

https://www.eurekalert.org/multimedia/pub/187519.php

https://www.igb.illinois.edu/article/new-laboratory-system-allows-researchers-probe-secret-lives-queen-bees

3-D Printing Ice Cream(3D Printed Food recipe (Chew ))

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Graduate students learned how to 3-D print ice cream in an additive manufacturing course at MIT.

According to John Hart, the Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor in Contemporary Technology and Mechanical Engineering at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. I very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and I’m proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing. The students’ final projects have included printers that they built specially to print molten glass and even soft-serve ice cream”.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-course-3-d-printing-101-0511

 

 

Housing construction with 3D concrete printers

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According to Professor Jay Sanjayan, the Swinburne University of Technology,” Each block of this freestanding structure is printed using a special cement composite. Rather than factory conditions, we have to print out in the weather.

Instead of a few kilos of materials, we have to handle tonnes. And although we don’t need the same accura­cy as the aerospace industry, we have to trade that for the low cost.”

 

http://theconversation.com/3d-concrete-printing-could-free-the-world-from-boring-buildings-106520

https://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2018/08/pioneering-housing-construction-with-3d-concrete-printers-at-swinburne.php

SV3DPrinter’s vision for the ‘99% ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY and GREEN’

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SV3DPrinter’s vision for the environment or ‘GREEN’
Nothing is completely green. 3D printing also not 100% environmental friendly or ‘ GREEN’. When we use the word ‘GREEN’ it is coming from the environment we use technology to make it word GREEN.
We all are contributors to make the world not so ‘GREEN’ or ‘POLLUTION’. We are the polluters.
The same thing for 3D Printing we use different material and printers. Using printers we need energy, same kind of energy we use to grow our raw food.
When we use ‘BIODEGRADABLE’ bags for garbage, the companies make those bags and basket, and paper bags too. Making those kinds of things we contribute more pollution.
Some of us eating raw we feel we are green but not. This is the reason people use the broom to sweep outside and inside of their house. They spread more dust and contributed more pollution to the atmosphere.
Whenever new products come in the market we always attract those things and get rid of the old thing, buy new thing even we don’t really need that.
Some of us taking the dogs for the walk, they are contributing more pollution to the atmosphere.
This is similar to use cell phone doing any other regular thing or cooking food at home.
With the 3D printing, we don’t try to waste the material can reuse the material and make any useful thing out of the waste material.
Every day we have some kind of material we call it waste or recycle. We receive junk mail, frozen food boxes, any kind of drinks bottle, or we drive to buy grocery or walk to buy things.
In my opinion, using 3D Printer may be not 100% ‘GREEN’ or environmental friendly but we can try to make it ‘99% ENVIRONMENTAL FRIENDLY and GREEN’. We need to have more understanding about Additive Manufacturing:)

Silicon Valley’s SV3DPrinter’s vision

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Artificial placenta created in the laboratory

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This is incredible to know about the placenta. the placenta is the most important part of pregnancy. I wish they had this discovery before.
It’s fine now we all know. I had complete placenta previa.
Since then really wanted to know more aggressively about new researches regarding placenta:)

Artificial placenta created in the laboratory
Complex substance exchange between mother and child
“The transport of substances through biological membranes plays an important role in various areas of medicine”, says Prof. Aleksandr Ovsianikov of the Institute of Materials Science and Technology at TU Wien. “These include the blood-brain barrier, ingestion of food in the stomach and intestine, and also the placenta.”
The placenta protects the infant by filtering out harmful substances while allowing others to pass through with ease. The Austrian scientists have now mimicked the natural processes that created the placenta with the help of novel, laser-based 3D printing process. The researchers claimed the artificial material is the closest scientists have come to replicating the fundamental human organ. Professor Aleksandr Ovsianikov, Institute of Materials Science and Technology in Vienna, said the placenta is a vital element of the human body. The expert said: “The transport system of substances through biological membranes plays an important role in various areas of medicine. “These include the blood-brain barrier, ingestion of food in the stomach and intestine, and also the placenta.”

https://www.tuwien.ac.at/en

https://www.tuwien.ac.at/en/news/news_detail/article/126119/

The bone repairing with 3D Print

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The bone repairing is very important. Due to the age and other factors, bones suffer from bone defects and disorders.
According to the Journal of Materials Chemistry,”The aim of this study is to set out to solve these problems by applying a modified 3D-printing method to prepare highly uniform CS scaffolds with controllable pore structure and improved mechanical strength. The in vivo osteogenesis of the prepared 3D-printed CS scaffolds was further investigated by implanting them in the femur defects of rats. The results show that the CS scaffolds prepared by the modified 3D-printing method have uniform scaffold morphology. The pore size and pore structure of CS scaffolds can be efficiently adjusted. The comprehensive strength of 3D-printed CS scaffolds is around 120 times that of conventional”.

 

https://www.asia-u.ac.jp/english/information/search/

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2012/jm/c2jm30566f#!divAbstract

https://www.ntuh.gov.tw/en/default_P.aspx

http://english.cmu.edu.tw/