3d printing university

3d Printing using Photoshop

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3d Printing using Photoshop


We all know about Photoshop, but using Photoshop in 3d printing is little bit different.

We need to have experts knowledge for using Photoshop. Mr. Ryan Kittleson is creator for this course. ūüôā

https://www.lynda.com/Photoshop-tutorials/3D-Printing-Photoshop/161099-2.html

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Princeton University, USA

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The Princeton Universities 3D Printer lab mainly used for hobby projects. In the begining they use PPPL and than they started using MakerBot. They use to make plastic objects.

Princeton’s students wanted to have Environmental friendly printer for all kinds of situations.

http://bp.pppl.gov/pub_report//2014/PPPL-4985.pdf

 

 

https://pppl.princeton.edu/3d_printer_lab

 

Vader Systems create 3-D Printer For Printing with Liquid Metal

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3-D printing liquid metal with Vader Systems



University of Buffalo student Zack Vader has created a machine that prints three-dimensional objects using liquid metal.

According to Professor Edward P. Furlani  of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Electrical Engineering departments of University at Buffalo, Vader’s process uses a magnetic field to manipulate conductive fluids.  The magnetic field is used to create pressure for squeezing the liquid out of an ejector nozzle.

According to Furlani ‚ÄúIt‚Äôs a transformative technology. ¬†It‚Äôs very exciting interdisciplinary engineering. I think its application base will continue to broaden and expand for the foreseeable future.‚ÄĚ

According to Chi Zhou, Assistant Professor¬†at University of Buffalo, ‚ÄúI can see at this stage that it can complement traditional metal printing, but later, maybe 10 years later, it can dominate the metal printing market because it can print better quality, cheaper and faster.‚ÄĚ

Vader’s 3-D printer can be used in future for¬†making custom knee and hip replacements.

BUFFALO, N.Y. ‚ÄĒ A father and son team in the START-UP NY program have invented a liquid metal printing machine that could represent a significant transformation in manufacturing. A breakthrough idea five years ago by former University at Buffalo student Zack Vader, then 19, has created a machine that prints three-dimensional objects using liquid metal.

 

Future of Education Technology Conference FETC 2016 in Orlando

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Future of Education Technology Conference FETC 2016 in Orlando

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The 36th Annual National FETC 2016 is being held in Orlando, Florida from January 13-15, 2016.  The FETC 2016 Expo Hall showcases latest products and technologies from over 500 manufacturers. These include 3D printing, robotics, software and various technologies related to education.

 

http://fetc.org/expo.html

3D Printed Microscopic Robotic Fish

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3D Printed Microscopic Robotic Fish

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Nano-engineers at University of California,  San Diego have been able to 3D print microscopic robots.  They developed tiny robots shaped like fish.  These are called microfish and are smaller than the width of human hair.  Nanoparticles are added in various parts of the microfish to make them functional.  Platinum nanoparticles installed in their tails help them propel forward.  Magnetic nanoparticles installed in their head can be used to steer them.

The microfish are developed using a 3D printing technology called microscale continuous optical printing.  This technology allows 3D printing hundreds of microfish within seconds. The shapes of the microbots to be changed, for example, to experiment with different shapes of fish such as sharks vs. ray fish, or experiment with other shapes such as birds.

According to Wei Zhu, a researcher developing the technology ‚ÄúWe have developed an entirely new method to engineer nature-inspired microscopic swimmers that have complex geometric structures and are smaller than the width of a human hair. With this method, we can easily integrate different functions inside these tiny robotic swimmers for a broad spectrum of applications.‚ÄĚ ¬†For example, toxic neutralizing particles can be included in the microfish to use them for detoxifying liquids. ¬†In future, this technology may allow delivery of medicine to specific parts of body via a blood stream.

 

 

 

3D-Printed Artificial Microfish. Advanced Materials. 2015

http://jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/news_releases/release.sfe?id=1797

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/microscopic-3d-printed-smart-fish-swim-bloodstream-deliver-drugs-remove-toxins/

http://www.medicaldaily.com/robotic-drugs-3d-printed-fish-bots-made-platinum-nanoparticles-can-swim-through-blood-349976

http://www.wsj.com/video/3-d-printed-tiny-fish-could-be-used-for-drug-delivery/F0100ED9-B13F-4247-AD65-BD8F0DCF8FB2.html

UCSF Researchers 3D Print Human Tissues Using DNA Programming

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UCSF Researchers 3D Print Human Tissues Using DNA Programming

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Researchers at UCSF have developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissue called organoids.  The technique uses DNA to guide the assembly of cells into organoids. This technique is called DNA Programmed Assembly of Cells (DPAC.)  The research team created several organoid arrays mimicking human tissues such as mammary glands.  The research was published in the journal Nature Methods on Aug. 31, 2015.

This technique incubates cells with snippets of single strands of DNA  The DNA attaches to the cell’s outer membrane.  The incubated cell attaches to other cells that are incubated with  matching DNA strands.  In other words, the cell doesn’t attach with other incubated cells if their DNA sequence does not match. A cell can be incubated with more than one type of DNA cells.  This allows the cell to attach to different types of cells.  This technique is similar to playing with legos.  A lego piece can attach to other lego pieces if they have matching sides.  This simple trick allows lego pieces to be combined to build a very large variety of toys.  Similarly, DPAC uses DNA strands attached to cells to create different types of organoids.

This technique can be used for therapeutic drug screening. ¬†According to Professor Gartner of UCSF, ‚ÄúOne potential application would be that within the next couple of years, we could be taking samples of different components of a cancer patient‚Äôs mammary gland and building a model of their tissue to use as a personalized drug screening platform. Another is to use the rules of tissue growth we learn with these models to one day grow complete organs.‚ÄĚ

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2015/08/131431/dna-guided-3-d-printing-human-tissue-unveiled

 

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2015/09/131716/building-human-breast-tissue-cell-cell

 

 

http://www.kurzweilai.net/dna-guided-3-d-printing-of-human-tissue

 

http://www.medgadget.com/2015/09/3d-tissue-printing-using-dna-guidance-system.html

 

http://www.healthline.com/health-news/researchers-discover-way-to-print-out-human-tissue-090715

 

http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/v12/n10/full/nmeth.3553.html

Carnegie Mellon University Researchers 3D Print Tissues Using MakerBot 3D Printers

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Carnegie Mellon University Researchers 3D Print Tissues Using MakerBot 3D Printers

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Human body can repair small tissue damages by itself.  However, human body has its limits and cannot fix several types of damages.  For example, human body is unable to fix several heart, problems, kidney problems, liver problems, and so on.  These problems are fixed by performing organ transplants.  Thousands of Americans are on waiting lists for various organ transplants.

Professor Adam Feinberg’s group at Carnegie Mellon is performing research that one day could make it unnecessary to transplant organs.  Instead, the required organs will be 3D printed.  Professor Feinberg’s group  is using MakerBot’s 3D printers for 3D printing tissues.

The technology can best be described in the words of Professor Feinberg, ‚ÄúThe challenge with soft materials ‚ÄĒ think about something like Jello that we eat ‚ÄĒ is that they collapse under their own weight when 3-D printed in air. ¬†So we developed a method of printing these soft materials inside a support bath material. Essentially, we print one gel inside of another gel, which allows us to accurately position the soft material as it’s being printed, layer-by-layer.‚ÄĚ

One important aspect of this research is that it is based on use of off-the-shelf 3D printers and not conventional bioprinters.  These off-the-shelf 3D printers cost in the range of a thousand dollars which is much more affordable compared typical bioprinters that cost in the range of hundred thousand dollars.  Also the research group is using open source software and releasing their 3D printer designs under an open source license.

http://engineering.cmu.edu/files/images/press/2015/Fixing-Broken-Hearts-Infographic.jpg

http://www.makerbot.com/blog/2015/11/05/3d-printing-tissues-and-organs-with-makerbot

 

 

http://engineering.cmu.edu/media/feature/2015/10_23_feinberg_paper.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-34505242

Mushtari: A 3D Printed Wearable Skin from MIT Mediated Matter in collaboration with Stratasys

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Mushtari: A 3D Printed Wearable Skin from MIT Mediated Matter in collaboration with Stratasys

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Professor Neri Oxman of MIT Media Lab revealed a 3D printed wearable at TED2015 in May 2015 in Vancouver.  The wearable is designed to host living matter and was called Mushtari, meaning giant.  Mushtari was 3D printed using a color multi-material 3D Printer developed by Stratasys. This is the world’s first wearable that combines multi-material additive manufacturing and synthetic biology.

photosynthesis to convert sunlight to sugar.  The compatible microbes consume the sugar to

Mushtari is based on synthetic biology.  It uses a symbiotic relationship between a photosynthetic microbe and compatible microbes.  The photosynthetic microbes use generate substances useful for the wearer such as pigments, food, fuel and scents. In future, the wearer could trigger the production of these substances.

 

According to Neri Oxman, ‚ÄúThis is the first time that 3D printing technology has been used to produce a photosynthetic wearable piece with hollow internal channels designed to house microorganisms. Inspired by the human gastrointestinal tract, Mushtari hosts synthetic microorganisms, a co-culture of photosynthetic cyanobacteria and E. coli bacteria that can fluoresce bright colors in darkness and produce sugar or biofuels when exposed to the sun. Such functions will in the near future augment the wearer by scanning our skins, repairing damaged tissue and sustaining our bodies, an experiment that has never been attempted before.‚ÄĚ

 

 

 

http://matter.media.mit.edu/environments/details/wanderers-living-mushtari

 

http://www.materialecology.com/projects/details/mushtari

3D Printing Materials: Glass

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3D Printing Materials: Glass

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3D printing using glass is difficult because of the high temperatures required to melt the material used for 3D printing. Technologies for 3D printing using glass exist so far mainly in research labs and Universities.  Some of these efforts are described below.

In 2009, researchers at Solheim Rapid Manufacturing Laboratory of University of Washington developed a process called Vitraglyphic.  In this process powdered glass is mixed with an adhesive materials and loaded into a 3D printer.  A binder is deposited into the powdered mixture and used for 3D printing shapes.  These shapes were put in a kiln so that the layers of glass fuse and create a solid glass object.  The team used similar procedure to 3D print ceramics objects.

In another effort, researchers led by Professor Neri Oxman of MIT’s Mediated Matter Group developed a 3D printer that extrudes molten glass.  The 3D printer maintains a nozzle through which the glass is extruded at temperatures of about 1,900 degrees Fahrenheit. This is significantly higher than the temperatures used for other 3D printing, for example, plastic.

An Israel based company Micron3DP has also announced that they have developed an extruder that can 3D print using molten glass at temperatures as high as 1640 degrees celsius.

 

https://sv3dprinter.com/2015/08/23/mit-develops-platform-for-3d-printing-glass/

http://news.mit.edu/2015/3-d-printing-transparent-glass-0914

https://depts.washington.edu/open3dp/2009/10/vitraglyphic-3d-printing-in-glass/

http://www.gizmag.com/3-d-glass-printing-method-developed/12963/

http://micron3dp.com/blogs/news/34473924-breakthrough-in-3d-printing-glass

https://sv3dprinter.com/2015/11/24/micron3dp-develops/

 

 

 

Fab@Home: The DIY 3D Printer from Cornell

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Fab@Home: The DIY 3D Printer from Cornell

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Fab@home was one of the first two open source do-it-yourself (DIY) 3D printer (the other open source DIY 3D printer was RepRap.) The Fab@Home 3D printer utilizes syringe tools that can make objects out of multiple materials.  The first version of Fab@Home print head had two syringes.  Later versions of Fab@Home 3D printers had more syringes going all the way up to eight syringes that could be used simultaneously.  Fab@Home 3D printers could be used with several materials including epoxy, silicone, food materials such as chocolate, cookie dough and cheese, among others.

The Fab@Home project was started by Hod Lipson and Evan Malone of the Cornell University Computational Synthesis Laboratory in 2006.  Before the release of open source 3D printers the 3D printer market was dominated by industrial 3D printers.  The goal of Fab@Home was to make 3D printers more popular and accessible for common people.  The project was continued until 2012.  The project was considered complete when the rate at which do-it-yourself 3D printers and consumer printers were being distributed exceeded the rate of industrial 3D printers.

http://www.fabathome.org

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fab@Home