3D Printing Planning and Projects

3D printed liquid silicone rubber

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According to German RepRap, “create future-oriented technologies and implement them in the design and production of our 3D printers. Since 2010 we have been developing our X-Series 3D Printers based on Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) technology. The special feature of all printers is the Open Source Platform, which makes it possible to use a variety of materials for printing. New consumables are constantly being tested and added to our product range. The Liquid Additive Manufacturing (LAM) process, liquids such as silicone rubber can also be processed.”

 

DOW CHEMICAL EVOLV3D

German RepRap

 

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3D Printing challenges and opportunities in the UK

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According to Fabbaloo, “Political, policy, economic and trade uncertainty will continue until the UK reaches future agreements with the EU and other countries and implements such new legal and regulatory regimes as are considered appropriate. This is likely to impact business planning for 2-10 years.
This effect is likely to dampen the expectations of sales managers of 3D print companies, particularly service bureaus who may have been looking for an increased presence in Europe. ”
According to TCT, “While physical products remain important, in the brave new world of 3D printing, products will also have digital versions, and businesses will need to place a much greater emphasis on protecting CAD files.”

 

Could 3D printing keep the UK at the forefront of innovation during economic uncertainty?

Could 3D printing keep the UK at the forefront of innovation during economic uncertainty?

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MEDTECH

3D printed personalized nutrition

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According to Anrich3D, “Food is made into a paste and extruded through an extruder that can be fed with paste continuously. Multiple extruders working together can allow for multi-material printing. Thus, each ingredient can be dispensed in the precise amount according to the individual’s nutritional, aesthetic palatability requirement.”

Anrich3D Wants to 3D Print Food Personalized Just For You

Anrich3D

The better way to 3D print organs

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According to the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and co-first author Mark Skylar-Scott, Ph.D., a Research Associate at the Wyss Institute, “This is an entirely new paradigm for tissue fabrication. Rather than trying to 3D-print an entire organ’s worth of cells, SWIFT (sacrificial writing into functional tissue) )focuses on only printing the vessels necessary to support a living tissue construct that contains large quantities of OBBs, which may ultimately be used therapeutically to repair and replace human organs with lab-grown versions containing patients’ own cells.”

A Swifter Way Towards 3D-printed Organs

Latest Harvard Gazette News

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs

Recycled Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

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Recycled Cellulose Polypropylene Composite Feedstocks for Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing. According to ACS publications,” Many types of consumer-grade packaging can be used in material extrusion additive manufacturing processes, providing a high-value output for waste plastics. However, many of these plastics have reduced mechanical properties and increased warpage/shrinkage compared to those commonly used in three-dimensional (3D) printing. Recycled polypropylene/waste paper, cardboard, and wood flour composites were made using a solid-state shear pulverization process.”

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Recycled Cellulose Polypropylene Composite Feedstocks for Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing

Achieve true 3D printing with non planar slicing

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According to Teaching Tech,” This is the most interesting thing I’ve done with my 3D printer in some time. Instead of printing in a series of 2D planes stacked up to form a 3D shape (2.5D), this non planar technique creates geometry with true 3D tool paths that can eliminate the steps often seen on shallow surfaces. Based on the amazing Masters Thesis of Daniel Ahlers and the University of Hamburg, this development can be tried yourself if you are willing to put in some time to setting it up.”

From comments,
Pinned by Teaching Tech
Teaching Tech
1 day ago
Hi everyone, some updates:
– A bunch of people pointed out that Windows 10 now has an embedded Linux environment. I installed this and went through the process again. I had a couple of errors and had to manually install missing cpan libraries via the command line. Slic3r did successfully compiled, but only runs via command line rather than with a graphical user interface as seen in this video. I’m sure there’s a way to add even more modules to get the GUI working, but it’s beyond my knowledge.
– Some people also mentioned setting up a dual boot configuration. This is another great suggestion but I need to have my Windows PC on at all times to keep my video production going, so not suitable for me.
– There have been some viewers pointing me towards ‘air brush’ nozzles. I’ve ordered a set, they look ideal for this technique.

falchulk
1 day ago
Windows subsystem for Linux 2.0 is much better then 1.0. Should be in the windows 10 1909 release.

grandaspanna
1 day ago
I have this working with WSL under Windows 10 and have used VcXsrv as the Xserver. It also allows pretty easy access between filesystems for loading STLs and writing back the gcode.

Doug Moody
1 day ago
@grandaspanna Yes. Most people with 3D printers know about gcode and STLs. They know how to calibrate their printers and make it print. But the software is somewhat mysterious, as are the effects one little change to a parameter in the slicer.
But what I think would help the most is a simple, already compiled executable program that would run and turn a traditional printer into a “true” 3D printer, using the methods discussed in this video.
I never even thought that my printer was a “2-1/2 D” printer until I watched this video. But now it makes so much more sense to do it this way. In fact, it makes sense to go one step further and make printers with five axes, so that the print nozzle is always perpendicular to the extrusion. When we get to that point, then we can start work on finer nozzles and plastic that extrudes with more granularity.
I do believe that the “big boys” who are printing airplane parts on demand have the right idea but that hasn’t filtered down to the hobbyists like me yet.

Gonun
2 days ago
This is awesome. No idea why I’m watching this as I don’t have a 3D printer, but it’s awesome.

Tina Yoga
2 days ago
I had recently been thinking of this kind of technique. I had thought that this technique would be more easily implemented with a delta based 3D printer. So that the print head could be tilted.

Gerhard Wilkens
1 day ago
you cant tilt the nozzle on a delta. the nozzle will always be parallel to the printbed

Tim Milgart
1 day ago
@Gerhard Wilkens Yes, but it would be logically more easily to do it on a delta based 3d printer. (As I see it, but i’m only a engineer, so everything can be done in my optic).

Filamax
1 day ago
it is very much doable, but is highly dependent on the Delta Design, my current delta prototype will actually do this, once i get the new board in, and some Titan Extruder spares. Cause the hot end hangs below the effector plate, with the magnetic arms on my printer giving a good range of movement the code can be adjusted to tilt the head. But it depends if slic3r can be adjusted to generate G-Code like this

Arek R.
2 days ago
That’s cool, but too much difficult work on software side.
I think it could really take of if CURA would make experimantal mode with it.
Then people would just need to remove the fan shroud, on stock Ender 3 that’s actually easy,

Žan Pekošak
2 days ago
This looks amazing! I will have to try it out very soon. Clean the Z screw and modify the CR10S hotend to have a part cooling fan and a decent head cooling fan…will see what I can do and if I manage it I will share it on Thingiverse.

Xander Vice
2 days ago
I mentioned this on the other video, but the next logical steps for non-planar are hot ends that have steeper angles, taller height to width ratio. Basically, with a steeper angled nozzle, it could fit into tighter curves. This also needs an entirely different cooling system, though, but that shouldn’t be too difficult to develop.
Non-planar also nicely extends into 5axis printing, which should be the next step of developments for the future of FDM.

 

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?
Are Likely to Increase in 2020.
According to ETFs consumers initially saw 3D printers as a “factory in every home, but they soon came to realize that the items they produced weren’t functional. As the hype fizzled out, new fears emerged in the manufacturing segment, and some companies using 3D printers saw year-over-year declines in their revenue. The rise and fall of additive manufacturing took place over a few short years, but that wasn’t the end of the story.”

According to TriLine“The share of renewables in meeting global energy demand is expected to grow by one-fifth in the next five years to reach 12.4% in 20232. RENW aims to offer long-term exposure to the growing future of energy,”

Additive manufacturing is on an upward trajectory as of late. This resurgence is due to the fact that the list of possible 3D-printable materials has more than doubled in the last five years.”

According to Dean Franks, the head of global sales at the additive manufacturing company, Autodesk, “believes that consumer products, industrial machinery, automotive and tooling applications are the growth opportunities for additive manufacturing. He believes that these industries will start to grow as the more established aerospace, medical and dental markets continue to grow.”
According to Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer at EOS, “predicts that 3D printing within healthcare will flourish because there is an increase in demand for personalized healthcare, treatments, and medical devices.”
According to the Morningstar North America Renewable Energy Index, which is designed, “to provide exposure to companies that operate across the full renewable energy supply chain, including renewable energy innovators, suppliers, adopters, and end-users.”
According to TriLine Index Solutions, the index and ETF development arm of Boone Pickens Capital Fund Advisors.”

Total 3D-Printing Index

The 3D Printing ETF Can Make A Comeback

Why Investments in Additive Manufacturing Are Likely to Increase in 2020

The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper

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The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper.
According to
Volkswagen Group, “The world’s largest 3D printed titanium pressure functional component ever produced on one of the most powerful brake test benches on the market! This is what it looks like when Bugatti prepares its first printed titanium brake caliper for series production.”

From comments,

Niels Cremer
Niels Cremer
7 months ago
Can 3d print brake calipers, can’t take higher frame rates for slow motion footage.

Reaper5.56 Xx
7 months ago
Can you 3d print better emission test.

Bassam Al-Rawi
7 months ago
Which 3D printer was used 😁

Qwerrrz
7 months ago
Looks like 3d printing just reached a new level. That’s insane.

Insert coolname
7 months ago
This is nothing new. I´ve seen 3D printed brake calipers in Formula Student cars.
vaporainwaves
7 months ago (edited)
I am pretty sure koenigsegg was faster to produce a functional 3D printed component from titanium. Outrageous.

MOTO-079
7 months ago
3d printed… still needs machining or are the brake pistons just gliding on a printed serves…

Callen Hurley
7 months ago
3D printing is the future of production.

Phar2Rekliss
7 months ago
Now lets see what 3D printed Inconel 750 parts can handle! Inconel is the next step level in material from Titanium for these kinds of purposes.

eLike
7 months ago
This brake caliper is made in ABS, people with a 3D printer will understand this.

Gavin 363
7 months ago
I’d be more impressed if the rotor was 3d printed.

Zachary Gamble
7 months ago
Not sure I would want a 3D printed caliper on my million dollar car.
SPIRIT01
7 months ago
Cnc machine is like a 3d metal printer , been around for a couple of years , idk I thought brembo and ceika , and all those other big brake kits I thought they had already printed out calipers.

sam sl
7 months ago
Just because things are 3D printed does not mean they are better.

kym516
7 months ago
Just saying, other manufacturers may have tested this idea before. I mean a 3d printed caliper can have lighter weight and better thermal control which is obvious enough for researches to be done. But still, good marketing peace of work. Hope this amazing technology can be used on consumer cars.

Boris Diamond
7 months ago
How hot was the calliper getting and how much was it deflecting? Mechanical properties are reduced at high temperatures, it’s impressive that it survived the test but I would like to know if it yielded or not and how many high load/temperature cycles it is capable of. It should be ok being Ti.
Oddvin Lorenzo Preinstad
7 months ago
3d printed car parts are probably normal in the future, imagine if your car breaks down and you have it brought to a mechanic. Today that mechanic has to order the parts which will take at least multiple days, with 3d printed parts it is a matter of hours,
.

Bugatti speeds up testing on its 3D-printed titanium brake caliper

Bugatti 3D printed titanium brakes to stop its $3 million Chiron supercar

Spectroplast silicone 3D printing got €1.4m investment from AM Ventures

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Spectroplast AG has developed a high-precision 3D printing technology for pure silicone, enabling the production of complex soft medical implants. Spectroplast’s Silicones are compatible with the latest SLA and DLP Technology, innovation lies in providing a cutting-edge material technology that makes industry-standard Silicones accessible to Additive Manufacturing.

According to Johann Oberhofern and Manuel Schaffner, Chief Technology Officer at Spectroplast, TCT Magazine, AM Ventures,” introduction of silicones to the world of additive manufacturing is well-timed with the rapidly growing demand for customized silicone products that we not only observe in the healthcare sector but also in many other markets.
As an industry, we are just starting to understand how powerful 3D printing of functional products will become when it is combined with the massive potential offered by industrial-scale production. Having the financial support and domain expertise of AMV will help us execute our mission even more rapidly and broadly.”

Spectroplast silicone 3D printing service backed with €1.4m investment from AM Ventures

Silicone 3D Printing Service

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