3D Printing History

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3D Printing zero-waste products are coming

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According to Peter H. Diamandis, MD, “3D Printing zero-waste products are coming, Welcome to the 2030 era of tailor-made, rapid-fire, ultra-cheap, and zero-waste product creation… on our planet, and far beyond. 3D Printing on the ISS.
Today, the most expensive supply chain in the known universe extends only 241 miles. Jutting straight up from mission control down here on Earth, this resupply network extends directly to the astronauts aboard the International Space Station (or the ISS).”

3D Printing Everything: Ultra-Cheap, Zero-Waste Products Are Coming

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More than 3000 highly inspiring followers and amazing guest writers with 1000 posts.

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3D-printing a lunar base

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According to European Space Agency, ESA, “Could astronauts one day be printing rather than building a base on the Moon? In 2013 ESA, working with industrial partners, proved that 3D printing using lunar material was feasible in principle. Since then, work continues to investigate the technique. The shielding against radiation provided by a 3D-printed block of simulated lunar regolith was measured, providing important inputs for next-stage designs.”
According to ESA(Now),” astronaut Luca Parmitano has arrived on the International Space Station following a six-hour flight in the Russian Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft alongside NASA astronaut Drew Morgan and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov.”

From comments,

4 years ago

This is all good except the “3d printing material” should be the regolith itself melted by focused solar energy. This way the printers could print an inexhaustible™ supply of infrastructure from roads to sinks to rail-launch systems and so on. You would want one specialized printer for printing the things that can’t be made from regolith. (control circuits, actuators, etc.)

I really hope NASA and ESA team up to explore the rest of our solar system and beyond.

3Years ago
Nice, would be able to put an observatory on the moon and make it a refuel station for further travel and a back up for rescue if needed also can make a shipbuilding/repair station safer launches don’t have to fight the gravity and atmosphere burn up, can also make a relay station put a full array of satellites on the moon.
It would be simpler and cheaper to ship high explosives to the moon and use them to excavate a cylindrical chamber into the side of a large crater (like building a tunnel on earth) and then seal off the end, pressurize, and occupy. Much roomier, more protection from radiation and meteor impacts. This 3-D printer idea is dull and uninspiring.
This is great news potentially. I hope one day we can live in space or the moon.

Now
2019: HASSEL wants to print a 3D mars base.

 

Why 3D printing could be key to a Moon base

 

ESA’s Purpose

MEET ASTRONAUT LUCA PARMITANO

Request a free 3D print sample part

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Request a free 3D print sample part.

Please read our policies before requesting the sample:)
According to the Formlabs, “stereolithography (SLA) print process, and see how Formlabs prints compare to parts made from an extrusion-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer:

Form 1+ is a stereolithography 3D printer. Today, we’re going to look at how it works and put it to the test against parts from an extrusion-based machine.

Let’s start by taking a closer look at the printer. When we open up the light blocking cover, we can see a build platform inside. This metal plate is where the parts are made.

Underneath the build platform is a liquid resin tank. This clear window gives the ultraviolet laser a path to cure the resin.

To start a print, we’ll upload a file, and fill up the resin tank to the indicator line. You can see the laser passing back and forth inside, hardening the liquid plastic.

Now, We’ll take our print out and wash it in rubbing alcohol to get the excess resin off. The flower comes with supports on it, and we’ll snip them off to finish the piece.

Stereolithography is known for producing extreme detail, with layers down to four times finer than a human hair.

The Form 1+ lets us take advantage of a library of materials, so we made some other parts to show what these resins can do.

A Castable Resin gives jewelers and engineers an inexpensive way to produce metal parts. This Flexible Resin is great for simulating different textures and as we can see, this Tough Resin and can really take a hit”.

 

Request a free sample part

 

Beyond nature, 3D printed Wood tissue

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According to the Professor Paul Gatenholm, who has led this research within Chalmers University of Technology’s Wallenberg Wood Science Centre and researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden,” have succeeded in 3D printing with a wood-based ink in a way that mimics the unique ‘ultrastructure’ of wood. Their research could revolutionize the manufacturing of green products. Through emulating the natural cellular architecture of wood, they now present the ability to create green products derived from trees, with unique properties – everything from clothes, packaging, and furniture to healthcare and personal care products.
This is a breakthrough in manufacturing technology. It allows us to move beyond the limits of nature, to create new sustainable, green products. It means that those products which today are already forest-based can now be 3D printed, in a much shorter time. And the metals and plastics currently used in 3D printing can be replaced with a renewable, sustainable alternative.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352940718304918?via%3Dihub#fig0025

http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Mimicking-the-ultrastructure-of-wood-with-3D-printing-for-green-products.aspx

https://newatlas.com/wood-nanocellulose-3d-printing/60347/

3D Printing News Alert(3D printing in the defence now and before)

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According to Army Technology, “3D printing in the defence manufacturing: issue 100 of Global Defence Technology out now. Global Defence Technology is back for a special celebratory 100th issue, as always packed with the latest industry news and analysis. In this issue, we explore the potential of additive manufacturing for defence applications, speak to Airbus about its involvement in the new DSEI Space Hub launching this year, and more.”

According to EDA’s ground-breaking project, “Additive Manufacturing Feasibility Study & Technology Demonstration. Aims to assess the areas where Additive Manufacturing (AM) (3D-printing) can have a positive impact on defence capabilities and to demonstrate its feasibility. In the morning of 31 May 2017, the 3D-printing lab was loaded on-board a Spanish C-130 and completed a successful 30-minute flight. This test was pivotal to examining the feasibility of the facility to be deployed by air. After landing, the lab and its equipment were inspected and found to have encountered no issues from the airlift.”

3D printing in defence manufacturing: issue 100 of Global Defence Technology out now