3D Printing easy diagnose and replace parts

BRECA Health Care

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According to BRECA Health Care,” is a biomedical engineering company that uses 3D printing technologies, computer aided design, reverse engineering and computational validation in order to develop state of the art custom made products and solutions in the healthcare sector. We are pioneers in the development of 3D bioprinting systems that are fundamental for the community of research in the development of new pharmaceuticals and advanced therapies. We are proud to say that we are helping to shape the future of medicine.”

BRECA Health Care

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Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

Worldwide 3D Printing Markets, 2019-2023

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Worldwide 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Markets, 2019-2023 – Driven by the Increasing Number of Approved 3D Printed Medical Products by FDA.
According to research and markets,” fastest-growing regional market in North America, due to early-stage adoption of 3D printing technologies and rise in application of 3D printing, specifically in the industrial area. Europe and the Asia Pacific are also contributing considerably to the global 3D printing market, with the increasing adoption and application of 3D printing in various industries, specifically automobiles, and aerospace.”

 

Worldwide 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Markets, 2019-2023 – Driven by the Increasing Number of Approved 3D Printed Medical Products by FDA

Global 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Market: Insights, Trends, and Forecasts (2019-2023)

Spectroplast silicone 3D printing got €1.4m investment from AM Ventures

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Spectroplast AG has developed a high-precision 3D printing technology for pure silicone, enabling the production of complex soft medical implants. Spectroplast’s Silicones are compatible with the latest SLA and DLP Technology, innovation lies in providing a cutting-edge material technology that makes industry-standard Silicones accessible to Additive Manufacturing.

According to Johann Oberhofern and Manuel Schaffner, Chief Technology Officer at Spectroplast, TCT Magazine, AM Ventures,” introduction of silicones to the world of additive manufacturing is well-timed with the rapidly growing demand for customized silicone products that we not only observe in the healthcare sector but also in many other markets.
As an industry, we are just starting to understand how powerful 3D printing of functional products will become when it is combined with the massive potential offered by industrial-scale production. Having the financial support and domain expertise of AMV will help us execute our mission even more rapidly and broadly.”

Spectroplast silicone 3D printing service backed with €1.4m investment from AM Ventures

Silicone 3D Printing Service

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3D printing and model helped to separate conjoined twins Safa and Marwa

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3D printing and model helped to separate conjoined twins Safa and Marwa.
According to Great Ormond Street Hospital and Charity, After consultation with their doctors in Pakistan, Great Ormond Street Hospital welcomed them to Bumblebee Ward in autumn 2018 and set about a four-month four-stage separation process involving multiple specialties across the hospital – from craniofacial, neurology and psychology experts, to nurses, radiologists, and physiotherapists”.

 

 

Great Ormond Street Hospital

Separating conjoined twins

Conjoined Twins Separated with Help of 3D Printing

HRE3D+ 3D Printed Titanium Wheel

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HRE3D+ 3D Printed Titanium Wheel. They first started 16 pounds for a 20-inch wheel, and 19 pounds for a 21-inch.
According to HRE President/CEO Alan Peltier, “We’re proud to be breaking new ground in wheel manufacturing with the updated HRE3D+ wheels. HRE utilize the brand’s 3D-printed multiple additive manufacturing systems ‘Direct Metal Laser Melting’ (DMLM). Working with GE Additive has given us access to some truly cutting-edge technology, and we’re exploring the future of wheel technology together with tools that will continue to evolve over the next few years. We can’t wait to see what we’re able to accomplish next”.

https://www.hrewheels.com/store

 

3D Printing News Alert(Bioengineered liquid cornea)

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For the fourth consecutive year, IISc has been ranked as India’s #1 university in the National Institutional Ranking Framework (NIRF) Rankings released by the Ministry of Human Resource Development.
According to the Bangalore-based biotechnology companyPandorum’s co-founder Dr. Tuhin Bhowmick, he has done Ph.D. from the Indian Institute of Science,” Bio-inspired Corneal ‘ink’ can be used as ‘Liquid Cornea’ for therapeutic application and to ‘print’ Corneal lenticule for human implantation – to treat visual impairment due to corneal defect”.

Indian Institute of Science
www.iisc.ac.in

http://www.pandorumtechnologies.com/

http://www.pandorumtechnologies.com/cornea.php

http://www.lvpei.org/

https://spinoff.com/cornea

3D Printer will Recycle Plastic in Space

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According to NASA, “The Refabricator on the International Space Station is a hybrid 3D printer that can also recycle materials to make new items. This technology could prove useful for future exploration missions to the Moon and Mars”.

http://www.nasa.gov/iss-science

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/centers/marshall/combination-3d-printer-will-recycle-plastic-in-space.html

The 3D printed robot hand

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The 3D printed robot hand, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. It has soft and rigid materials together to replicate all the bones and ligaments.

According to Ph.D. student Josie Hughes from Cambridge’s Department of Engineering, “We can use passivity to achieve a wide range of movement in robots- walking, swimming or flying, for example, Smart mechanical design enables us to achieve the maximum range of movement with minimal control costs. We wanted to see just how much movement we could get with mechanics alone”. She is the paper’s first author.

http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/3d-printed-robot-hand-plays-piano