3D Printing in Medicine and Health

Three Guinness World Records related to the largest 3D printer

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According to Sen. Susan Collins, “I was delighted to join UMaine’s celebration unveiling the world’s largest 3D printer and largest 3D-printed object. The future of the [UMaine] Composites Center is bright, thanks to the excellent working relationship between UMaine, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many other federal agencies, which will support next-generation, large-scale additive manufacturing with biobased thermoplastics. As a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I helped secure $20 million for this exciting collaboration, and an additional $20 million is included in the committee-approved energy funding bill. By working together, UMaine and Oak Ridge will strengthen environmentally responsible advanced manufacturing throughout America, as well as the forest-products industry in Maine.”

According to Sen. Angus King, “Maine is the most forested state in the nation, and now we have a 3D printer big enough to make use of this bountiful resource. Today marks the latest innovative investment in Maine’s forest economy, which will serve to increase sustainability, advance the future of biobased manufacturing and diversify our forest products industry. This is a huge opportunity for the state of Maine, and I’m grateful to everyone — especially the the University of Maine and the FOR/Maine initiative — for their work to make this day a reality.”

According to U.S. Rep. Jared Golden, “As we saw today, the University of Maine Composites Center does award-winning, cutting-edge research that makes Maine proud and will bring jobs to our state. Their work, like the boat and 3D printer we’re here to see, has impressive potential to change how we make things out of all sorts of materials — including Maine wood fiber. Today is about three Guinness World Records, but it’s also about celebrating the innovation that will help protect and create good-paying Maine jobs in forest products and manufacturing.”

According to Moe Khaleel, associate laboratory director for Energy and Environmental Sciences at ORNL, “This is an exciting achievement in our partnership with the University of Maine. This new equipment will accelerate application and integration of our fundamental materials science, plant genomics and manufacturing research to the development of new sustainable bioderived composites, creating economic opportunity for Maine’s forest products industry and the nation.”

UMaine Composites Center receives three Guinness World Records related to largest 3D printer

World’s largest 3D printed boat

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Metal X 3D printing system to prototype surgical instruments

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Metal X 3D printing system to prototype surgical instruments. Shukla Medical is an orthopedic instrument manufacturer dedicated to pioneering truly universal orthopedic implant removal solutions.
According to Zack Sweitzer, Product Development Manager at Shukla Medical, “3D printing the prototype product helps our surgeons test the part in their hands before going into the operating room, so they already have the experience and confidence in the tool. We’re going to bring a lot more products to market faster with our Markforged printers and we finally have the design freedom to do it.”

Shukla Medical

4D Bio3 Technology Edit

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According to Uniformed Services University and NASA, “Using 3D biological printers to produce usable human organs has long been a dream of scientists and doctors around the globe. However, printing the tiny, complex structures found inside human organs, such as capillary structures, has proven difficult to accomplish in Earth’s gravity environment. To overcome this challenge, Techshot designed its BioFabrication Facility (BFF) to print organ-like tissues in microgravity, acting as a stepping stone in a long-term plan to manufacture whole human organs in space using refined biological 3D printing techniques.”

 

The University of Rhode Island

BioFabrication Facility

3D bioprinting of tissues and organs

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According to Yehiel Tal, the Chief Executive Officer of CollPlant, “This fund raising is intended to support the advancement of our pipeline in the fields of medical aesthetics and 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. We are now focused on facilitating our development programs of dermal fillers and regenerative breast implants. Our collaboration with United Therapeutics, which is using our BioInk technology for 3D printing lungs, is progressing, and we continue to expand our business collaborations with large international healthcare companies that seek to implement our revolutionary regenerative medicine technology. We are very pleased to have entered into this transaction with Mr. Sagi and the other investors.”

 

CollPlant Biotechnologies Raising $5.5 Million

3D printed clear aligners

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3D printed clear aligners. According to Clinique Dentaire Casablanca, “The Invisalign system is a combination of proprietary virtual modeling software, rapid manufacturing processes, and mass customization, and virtually clear, removable appliances or “aligners” that are used to straighten teeth.”

From comments,

Andrew Thiyam
1 year ago
Can Invisalign also correct “Deepbite” to some extent??

CoChief Emeralds
9 months ago
I have those Invisalign trays for 8 more months

CoChief Emeralds
9 months ago
It took 8 to 10 weeks for my aligners to be ready because they had to do a quality check and all that good stuff let alone deciding if I need attachments on my teeth.

 

We use cutting-edge technology to manufacture best-in-class Clear Aligners

Manufacture Your Next 

3D printed a “rabbit-sized” heart

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According to BIOLIFE4D, “We have developed a proprietary bioink using a very specific composition of different extracellular matrix compounds that closely replicate the properties of the mammalian heart. Further, it has developed a novel and unique bioprinting algorithm, consisting of printing parameters optimized for the whole heart. Coupling its proprietary bioink with patient-derived cardiomyocytes and its enabling bioprinting technology, BIOLIFE4D is able to bioprint a heart that, while smaller in size, replicates many of the features of a human heart. With this platform technology in place, BIOLIFE4D is now well-positioned to build upon this platform and work towards the development of a full-scale human heart.”

 

BIOLIFE4D Just 3D Printed A Human ‘Mini-Heart’

BIOLIFE4D Reaches Groundbreaking Milestone and Successfully 3D Bioprints a Mini-Heart

https://english.tau.ac.il/

The better way to 3D print organs

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According to the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and co-first author Mark Skylar-Scott, Ph.D., a Research Associate at the Wyss Institute, “This is an entirely new paradigm for tissue fabrication. Rather than trying to 3D-print an entire organ’s worth of cells, SWIFT (sacrificial writing into functional tissue) )focuses on only printing the vessels necessary to support a living tissue construct that contains large quantities of OBBs, which may ultimately be used therapeutically to repair and replace human organs with lab-grown versions containing patients’ own cells.”

A Swifter Way Towards 3D-printed Organs

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A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs