3d printing and Health

Drones and human

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Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, put their work to the test recently.

Researchers team built three custom drones such as dubbed Batman, Joker and Nightwing.

Rob Reid of JPL said, “We pitted our algorithms against a human You can actually see that the A.I. flies the drone smoothly around the course, whereas human pilots tend to accelerate aggressively, so their path is jerkier our autonomous drones can fly much faster, one day you might see them racing professionally!”

AI and 3D, 4D Printing have the ability to work like mankind does. This is a software humans are going to write code. We always need humans for improved technologies, especially in the medical field for better health. 🙂

https://www.jpl.nasa.gov

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Dr. 3d Printer( Zimpure 2, 3D Printing without toxic emissions)

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Zimpure 2, is a compact and discrete air purifier for 3D Printing without toxic emissions works with FDM printers. Few days later they will conduct more test on DLP and SLA printers. Zimpure is filtering 99% of the nanoparticles and more than 90% of the gases released.

Zimple3D co-founders Antoine Franz and Nicolas Roux promise to make 3D printing safer with an innovative adaptable air filter called Zimpure.

When we use 3D printer’s plastic can make irritating smell.  It’s actually a mix of harmful gases and nanoparticles. This is due to thermoplastic fusion. Professionals in the thermoplastic industry and folks with an average sense of smell, We have already smelled this odor of melted plastic and we know it can’t be good for your health.

 

 

3D-Printed Hand Enables Girl’s First Pitch

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Hailey Dawson was born with a rare disease, but a 3D printer is changing her life.

3D-Printed Hand Enables Girl’s First Pitch. Hailey is 7 year old, with the help of 3D printed hand she throw first pitch!!!!

“She has no fear. When she waves, she waves with her little hand. When kids want to hold her hand, that’s the hand she pulls out. She has no care about what other people think,” said Yong Dawson, Hailey’s mom. “When people ask her, she says, ‘This is what I was born with. You were born with blue eyes, I was born with his hand. This is me.’”

Hailey began her run of ceremonial first pitches a few years ago at a University of Nevada Las Vegas Rebels game, not far from where the Dawsons live.

The Dawson family collaborating with researchers from South Africa to the U.S. — to find a hand that fit just right.

The 3D-printed hand project has been led by Dr. Mohamed Trabia, the associate dean for Research, Graduate Studies and Computing at UNLV, and a professor of mechanical engineering, as well as Dr. Brendan O’Toole, chair of the university’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and director of the College of Engineering’s Mendenhall Innovation Program that’s focused on entrepreneurship and design.

https://www.sporttechie.com/3d-printed-hand-enabling-child-pitch-across-mlb/

3D / 4D printing inflatable structure

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Nottingham Trent University  in Nottingham, England.

Professor Philip Breedon’s research interests and latest projects center on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilization of ‘’ smart materials for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals. research interests and latest projects center on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilisation of ‘smart materials’ for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals.His research interests and latest projects centre on new and emerging technologies and materials. This includes wearable technologies, additive and subtractive manufacturing for medical applications, biomimetics, surgical robotics, augmented / virtual / immersive technologies and environments, and investigative research related to the utilisation of ‘smart materials’ for medical applications. Phil believes that multidisciplinary research activity is a significant and major contributor in developing innovative research proposals.

https://www.ntu.ac.uk/staff-profiles/architecture-design-built-environment/philip-breedon