3D printers next big industrial thing

3D printing uptake to increase in oil and gas industry

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According to 3D Printing in Oil & Gas – Thematic Research, “Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has emerged as one of the key enabling technologies in driving industrial productivity. Over the years, 3D printing technology has received increasing prominence in different industries and has significantly impacted automotive and aerospace manufacturing. The oil and gas industry has also shown slow but steady adoption of this technology in recent years. Initially, 3D printing technology was largely limited to polymer-based products. However, recent advancements in metal-based 3D printing is making this technology more relevant to the oil and gas industry.”

3D Printing in Oil & Gas – Thematic Research

3D printing uptake to increase in oil and gas industry

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U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?

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Why Investments in 2020 Additive Manufacturing?
Are Likely to Increase in 2020.
According to ETFs consumers initially saw 3D printers as a “factory in every home, but they soon came to realize that the items they produced weren’t functional. As the hype fizzled out, new fears emerged in the manufacturing segment, and some companies using 3D printers saw year-over-year declines in their revenue. The rise and fall of additive manufacturing took place over a few short years, but that wasn’t the end of the story.”

According to TriLine“The share of renewables in meeting global energy demand is expected to grow by one-fifth in the next five years to reach 12.4% in 20232. RENW aims to offer long-term exposure to the growing future of energy,”

Additive manufacturing is on an upward trajectory as of late. This resurgence is due to the fact that the list of possible 3D-printable materials has more than doubled in the last five years.”

According to Dean Franks, the head of global sales at the additive manufacturing company, Autodesk, “believes that consumer products, industrial machinery, automotive and tooling applications are the growth opportunities for additive manufacturing. He believes that these industries will start to grow as the more established aerospace, medical and dental markets continue to grow.”
According to Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer at EOS, “predicts that 3D printing within healthcare will flourish because there is an increase in demand for personalized healthcare, treatments, and medical devices.”
According to the Morningstar North America Renewable Energy Index, which is designed, “to provide exposure to companies that operate across the full renewable energy supply chain, including renewable energy innovators, suppliers, adopters, and end-users.”
According to TriLine Index Solutions, the index and ETF development arm of Boone Pickens Capital Fund Advisors.”

Total 3D-Printing Index

The 3D Printing ETF Can Make A Comeback

Why Investments in Additive Manufacturing Are Likely to Increase in 2020

Materialise reports the Second quarter and now, 2019 results

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Materialise incorporates nearly 30 years of 3D printing experience into a range of software solutions and 3D printing services, which form the backbone of the 3D printing industry.
According to Materialise,” Let’s discuss ways how we can empower people to design, collaborate, build, and fabricate in more sustainable ways, while reducing waste, saving money, and staying competitive. At the end of the second quarter of 2019, the total commitment of lease assets and liabilities amounted to 5,050 kEUR. Our Adjusted EBITDA for the second quarter of 2019 was affected positively by the new standard as a result of the rental payments decrease of 644 kEUR; however, our operating profit was impacted by only 52 kEUR as depreciation expenses increased by 593 kEUR.
Materialise, Will acquire a mix of existing and new shares bringing its total shareholding to 75%, with the founding shareholders retaining the remaining 25%. All shares will be fully paid for in cash at the closing, which is expected to take place during the week of August 5, 2019.”

According to Materialise reports the Second quarter and now, 2019 Results, Executive Chairman Peter Leys commented, “In spite of a macro-economic environment that continues to be challenging, Materialise reported another quarter of top-line growth. This was mainly driven by Materialise Medical, which continued to perform strongly with solid revenue growth and EBITDA performance, and also by Materialise Manufacturing, which realized a double-digit EBITDA margin and grew its revenues for the third consecutive quarter.

This quarter, the contribution by Materialise Software to our revenue growth and Adjusted EBITDA margin was below our expectations as a number of sales were pushed out to the second half of the year. Our outlook for 2019 remains within our previous guidance range, with our results now including expected contributions from our August acquisition of a 75% stake in Engimplan.

This investment, which will enable us to introduce the benefits of Materialise’s patient-specific 3D printing implants and expertise to the fast-growing Brazil market, is part of our strategy to accelerate our growing presence in the additive manufacturing ecosystem through carefully selected acquisitions and partnerships.”

Empowering your 3D printing applications

Materialise Magics 3D Print Suite

Prellis Biologics has raised $8.7M

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According to Dr. Alex Morgan, Principal at Khosla Ventures and Dr. Melanie Matheu, Prellis Biologics’ co-founder and CEO, “Regenerative medicine has made enormous leaps in recent decades. However, to create complete organs, we need to build higher-order structures like the vascular system. Prellis’ optical technology provides the scaffolding necessary to engineer these larger masses of tissues. With our investment in Prellis, we’re supporting an initiative that will ultimately produce a functioning lobe of the lung, or even a kidney, to be used in addressing an enormous unmet global need.

The human tissue engineering is the ability to build complex tissues with working vascular systems. The future of regenerative medicine revolves around harnessing the power of our own cells as therapeutics and building the tissues to keep them alive. Khosla Ventures is the perfect investor to support our merging of deep tech and cutting-edge regenerative medicine. With this technology in hand, we can begin to ask questions about real 3D cell biology that have never been asked before.”

PRELLIS BIOLOGICS rings without background.png building life with light

EurekAlert! Science NewsA service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Sand 3D Printer before and now

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According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
Category
7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

Is a sand 3D printer the future of Additive Manufacturing?

3D-printing a lunar base

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According to European Space Agency, ESA, “Could astronauts one day be printing rather than building a base on the Moon? In 2013 ESA, working with industrial partners, proved that 3D printing using lunar material was feasible in principle. Since then, work continues to investigate the technique. The shielding against radiation provided by a 3D-printed block of simulated lunar regolith was measured, providing important inputs for next-stage designs.”
According to ESA(Now),” astronaut Luca Parmitano has arrived on the International Space Station following a six-hour flight in the Russian Soyuz MS-13 spacecraft alongside NASA astronaut Drew Morgan and Roscosmos cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov.”

From comments,

4 years ago

This is all good except the “3d printing material” should be the regolith itself melted by focused solar energy. This way the printers could print an inexhaustible™ supply of infrastructure from roads to sinks to rail-launch systems and so on. You would want one specialized printer for printing the things that can’t be made from regolith. (control circuits, actuators, etc.)

I really hope NASA and ESA team up to explore the rest of our solar system and beyond.

3Years ago
Nice, would be able to put an observatory on the moon and make it a refuel station for further travel and a back up for rescue if needed also can make a shipbuilding/repair station safer launches don’t have to fight the gravity and atmosphere burn up, can also make a relay station put a full array of satellites on the moon.
It would be simpler and cheaper to ship high explosives to the moon and use them to excavate a cylindrical chamber into the side of a large crater (like building a tunnel on earth) and then seal off the end, pressurize, and occupy. Much roomier, more protection from radiation and meteor impacts. This 3-D printer idea is dull and uninspiring.
This is great news potentially. I hope one day we can live in space or the moon.

Now
2019: HASSEL wants to print a 3D mars base.

 

Why 3D printing could be key to a Moon base

 

ESA’s Purpose

MEET ASTRONAUT LUCA PARMITANO

3D-printing an Aventador in the garage

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According to CTV News,” the Colorado physicist Physicist Sterling Backus who’s constructing this lookalike, Lamborghini, using a 3D printer. 3D-printing an Aventador in the garage.”
According to MOTOR, “My son said he loved the Aventador and wondered if it was possible to build one. He did not need to twist my arm too much!”

 

 

Physicist And His Son Are 3D-Printing A Lamborghini Aventador

Father-son team 3D-printing a full-size Lamborghini lookalike

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MOTOR Physicist 3D-prints a Lamborghini Aventador in his own garage

3D printed 5G antenna

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According to Mark Mirotznik, professor of electrical engineering at the University of Delaware,” for technologies like wearables and things like that, it means we don’t have to have flat electronics anymore or flat antennas, it can be flexible. So for those applications, it’s really novel that you can actually print all of this stuff on a flexible membrane. It opens up new possibilities. 3D printing (specifically, NanoParticle Jetting technology offered by XJet) is the only manufacturing technique capable of meeting the production demands of a new kind of passive beam steering 5G antenna designed by his team.”

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Researchers see 5G promise in 3D-printing tech