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3D printing uptake to increase in oil and gas industry

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According to 3D Printing in Oil & Gas – Thematic Research, “Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, has emerged as one of the key enabling technologies in driving industrial productivity. Over the years, 3D printing technology has received increasing prominence in different industries and has significantly impacted automotive and aerospace manufacturing. The oil and gas industry has also shown slow but steady adoption of this technology in recent years. Initially, 3D printing technology was largely limited to polymer-based products. However, recent advancements in metal-based 3D printing is making this technology more relevant to the oil and gas industry.”

3D Printing in Oil & Gas – Thematic Research

3D printing uptake to increase in oil and gas industry

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5 Ways You Can Use 3D Printing Technology For Your Small Business

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Guest Post by Madeline Dudziak

Also a huge fan of reading – perhaps a natural result of being named after the famous children’s book – Madeline’s Kindle is always crammed with more books than leisure time allows. Among other ways, she spends her free time are fun activities with her husband and young children, volunteering, and participating in two book clubs.

5 Ways You Can Use 3D Printing Technology For Your Small Business

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At one point in time, a 3D printer was something only large scale manufacturing businesses really benefitted from. 3D printers were bulky, and just not easily accessible for someone not in a large factory-type setting. It was helpful in those environments but there didn’t seem to be a clear path to getting 3D printing technology into smaller settings. 

3D printers being for large businesses is no longer the reality, however. Many small businesses have been able to start using 3D printers for their benefit. There are a lot of ways you can use a 3D printer that you may not have considered yet. 3D printing technology is everywhere now. Printers are smaller, more affordable, and easier than ever to use.

If you’ve been thinking about buying a 3D printer for your small business but you haven’t made the leap yet, it’s time to start considering what a 3D printer can really do for you. 3D printing technology could change how you’re doing things now in a big way. If you’re still not convinced, here are five ways you can use 3D printing technology for your small business.

1. Easy, Quick Prototypes

When you’re developing a new product for your business, getting a prototype in your hands can be a bit of a hassle. If you don’t have an in-house production team (and most small businesses don’t) then you’ll likely have to place an order with a large production company. Depending on where the company is located costs and production time can be huge obstacles.

As you’re creating your new product you may hold off on ordering extra prototypes for every small change due to the aforementioned costs. This can result in you not being able to see and hold every design iteration. It can leave you wondering what a small change will do to the look and functionality of your product because you don’t have a concrete example to look at.

With 3D printing, you’ll have the chance to print out your own prototype. Adjusting a small part (or even a large part) of your product’s design to fix a flaw just means you have to print a new prototype. It’s easy to do and design changes are as easy as adjusting the printer plans you’ve already created. 

Being able to print your own prototypes gives you a whole host of new possibilities. In addition to being able to see each design iteration, you’ll also be able to print prototypes for customers or investors to look at or take with them. You’re the one in control of the prototyping process when you use a 3D printer because you have the power to create whatever you need. That’s a big deal.

2. Use Your Printer To Drum Up Interest

Customers love freebies, it’s a fact. Whether it’s a free gift with purchase or a token of appreciation when you give your customers something their loyalty for your business will increase. So offer them something they actually can’t get somewhere else and 3D print your logo onto something. 

When you can offer a unique freebie, even something fairly minor like a coaster or business card that you have 3D printed in-house you will not only save money on incidental free gifts but you will have created something buzzworthy. When the word gets out that you’re offering something no one else can people are going to want to hop on that bandwagon!

If you create demand for your freebie, you can create demand for your business. Consider printing your token in multiple colors. That way your regular customers can collect them. (Perhaps when they have a full set they could earn a special discount?) 

By rewarding loyal customers giving them something you have 3D printed yourself, you could see a big boost in your business. Show your customers a little appreciation in the form of a freebie and it’s a safe bet they will appreciate you right back. 

3. Offer Up Your Printer 

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It may seem strange to think about purchasing a 3D printer for your business especially if 3D printing doesn’t make much sense with your mission. But while 3D printing has a serious fan base in the general public a majority of people have never 3D printed before. 

Therefore it could be fun to offer your customers a chance to print something of their own with purchase. Let’s say you’re in the food or hospitality industry, you could have a promotion where if someone buys lunch they can also print something in 3D. 

There are many things you can 3D print in as little as 10 minutes which really isn’t that much time if you’re sitting down for a cup of coffee in a cafe. While this might seem a little gimmicky at first that 3D printer investment could pay off in a big way in drumming up customers and building interest in your business. 

4. Small Batch Manufacturing 

Even if you aren’t a manufacturing company, a 3D printer can be helpful to print a small inventory of what is needed. While of course there are large companies you can order pieces from it could be incredibly handy for your business to be able to print things you need on your own printer. 

Why would you keep paying for someone else to 3D print your stuff for you when you can do it yourself and save money? Think about whether having a printer can benefit your bottom line and save you time running around looking for things you can quickly print on your own. 

Especially if you find yourself in need of replacement parts frequently, you stand to benefit from printing your own. When you control the quality of the parts you need you can quickly get back to work instead of waiting for a replacement to arrive. 

5. Build A Little Farm  

Slowly we are going to start seeing 3D printing farms popping up the way of old school copy centers. As consumers start to see the benefits of 3D printing they are going to want in on the fun and see the technology for themselves. So it isn’t so far fetched to think you may want to offer customer’s the chance to print as needed by the public.

It would be an easy addition to many small businesses. Obviously, you can use the printers when needed as well, but when they aren’t in use for your prototypes you can set a pricing scale for those who would like to print. It’s a good way to earn some extra income and spread the love of 3D printing around. 

Conclusion: 

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Having a 3D printer for your business can be incredibly beneficial for both your own bottom line and your relationship with customers. No longer are 3D printers only for big businesses and factories. Make sure your small business doesn’t fall behind, consider how much 3D printing technology can help you succeed. 

Madeline Dudziak’s Bio:

Madeline Dudziak loves words. As a web content creator, she crafts messages that help clients inform, educate, persuade, or connect. Madeline’s also a freelance theater reviewer for the River Cities’ Reader, which combines her passion for writing with her passion for theatre. 

Air Force lab and 3D printing

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According to Hilmar Koerner, Ph.D., research team lead for polymer matrix composite materials and processes at the AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, “Additive manufacturing is important to the future of aerospace for a variety of reasons. Benefits include complexity enabled capability; low-volume, low-cost manufacturing; part reduction; improved form-fit function; tool-less part manufacturing; and lightweighting of interior hardware, such as air ducts, seat framework and wall panels.”

According to Jeffery Baur, Ph.D., leader of the AFRL Composite Performance Research Team, “Printing composites can produce parts with complex shapes and eliminates the need for the expensive pressure cooker and long heating cycles. The possibility to produce parts in the field or at a depot without a long logistics tail is a win-win scenario.”

Air Force lab takes 3D printing to new heights

U.S. Air Force – The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900

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According to Travis release,” The first approved project was printed on the Stratasys F900, can print parts with dimensions up to 36 inches x 24 inches x 36 inches made of Ultem 9085, a specialized plastic known for its extra flexibility, density and strength. The 60th Maintenance Squadron at Travis AFB, Calif., is the Air Force’s first-ever field unit to be equipped with a Federal Aviation Administration- and USAF-certified 3D printer capable of producing aircraft parts. Typically, parts that don’t keep the aircraft from performing their mission don’t have as high as a priority for replacement.”
According to MSgt. John Higgs, the squadron’s metals technology section chief, in the release, “We already have a list from the Air Force level to help them print and to backfill some supplies. This will ensure other bases can replace items sooner than expected with our help.”

Travis Maintenance Squadron First to Produce Certified, 3D-Printed Parts

The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper

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The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper.
According to
Volkswagen Group, “The world’s largest 3D printed titanium pressure functional component ever produced on one of the most powerful brake test benches on the market! This is what it looks like when Bugatti prepares its first printed titanium brake caliper for series production.”

From comments,

Niels Cremer
Niels Cremer
7 months ago
Can 3d print brake calipers, can’t take higher frame rates for slow motion footage.

Reaper5.56 Xx
7 months ago
Can you 3d print better emission test.

Bassam Al-Rawi
7 months ago
Which 3D printer was used 😁

Qwerrrz
7 months ago
Looks like 3d printing just reached a new level. That’s insane.

Insert coolname
7 months ago
This is nothing new. I´ve seen 3D printed brake calipers in Formula Student cars.
vaporainwaves
7 months ago (edited)
I am pretty sure koenigsegg was faster to produce a functional 3D printed component from titanium. Outrageous.

MOTO-079
7 months ago
3d printed… still needs machining or are the brake pistons just gliding on a printed serves…

Callen Hurley
7 months ago
3D printing is the future of production.

Phar2Rekliss
7 months ago
Now lets see what 3D printed Inconel 750 parts can handle! Inconel is the next step level in material from Titanium for these kinds of purposes.

eLike
7 months ago
This brake caliper is made in ABS, people with a 3D printer will understand this.

Gavin 363
7 months ago
I’d be more impressed if the rotor was 3d printed.

Zachary Gamble
7 months ago
Not sure I would want a 3D printed caliper on my million dollar car.
SPIRIT01
7 months ago
Cnc machine is like a 3d metal printer , been around for a couple of years , idk I thought brembo and ceika , and all those other big brake kits I thought they had already printed out calipers.

sam sl
7 months ago
Just because things are 3D printed does not mean they are better.

kym516
7 months ago
Just saying, other manufacturers may have tested this idea before. I mean a 3d printed caliper can have lighter weight and better thermal control which is obvious enough for researches to be done. But still, good marketing peace of work. Hope this amazing technology can be used on consumer cars.

Boris Diamond
7 months ago
How hot was the calliper getting and how much was it deflecting? Mechanical properties are reduced at high temperatures, it’s impressive that it survived the test but I would like to know if it yielded or not and how many high load/temperature cycles it is capable of. It should be ok being Ti.
Oddvin Lorenzo Preinstad
7 months ago
3d printed car parts are probably normal in the future, imagine if your car breaks down and you have it brought to a mechanic. Today that mechanic has to order the parts which will take at least multiple days, with 3d printed parts it is a matter of hours,
.

Bugatti speeds up testing on its 3D-printed titanium brake caliper

Bugatti 3D printed titanium brakes to stop its $3 million Chiron supercar

Jabil’s plan for $42M medical 3D printing with 24 percent core EPS growth

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According to St. Petersburg-based Jabil (NYSE: JBL),” is set to make a $42 million investment in Albuquerque, New Mexico for technology and equipment as it makes the Duke City its “center of excellence” for 3D printing, officials announced on Aug. 15. The company said it plans to hire 120 employees in the next five years.”
According to New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said in a statement “We have all the talent in the world right here in New Mexico, and when we build the infrastructure for a 21st-century economy, we will see more young adults stay here and more homegrown talent return here.”
According to CEO Mark Mondello, “I’m extremely pleased with our third-quarter performance, highlighted by solid operational excellence and strong financial results. The team delivered 20 basis points of core margin expansion on double-digit revenue growth, culminating in an impressive 24 percent core EPS growth, year-over-year. Our strong year-to-date results validate that our diversification strategy has firmly taken hold.”

Delivering insoles in 1/2 the time, at a fraction of the cost.

3D Printing Breaking Through the Barriers in Manufacturability

JABIL

Medical Device Mechatronics

Jabil Unveils Plans for $42M Medical 3D Printing Center of Excellence

Jabil unveils plans for $42M medical 3D printing center of excellence

Jabil: Florida manufacturing giant announces plans to invest $42M, create 100+ jobs in New Mexico

Florida manufacturing giant announces plans to invest $42M, create 100+ jobs in New Mexico

The Lightyear One is 3D printed

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More than 55 interior parts for the Lightyear One are 3D printed.
According to Lex Hoefsloot, CEO of Lightyear announces and Robert Llewellyn, ” gets an exclusive first look at the Lightyear One hyper-efficient luxury sedan, a partially solar-powered electric car. And gets to experience it as one of the first passengers!

When Solar Team Eindhoven won the world solar challenge in Australia driving a 4 seater 100% solar-powered car over 3,000 kilometers, no one would have believed that a handful of years later they could come up with this.
Lightyear One. A spacious hyper-efficient partially solar-powered electric car.
We know the future is electric, could it be solar electric.”

 

 

 

 

Always charging in the sun. Longest range. Most sustainable.

Fabbaloo

ExOne and Siemens Digital Industries partnership for 3D printing

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According to Dr. Karsten Heuser, Vice President of Additive Manufacturing at Siemens Digital Industries and ExOne CEO John Hartner, “With this expanded partnership, ExOne will deliver even more value to our foundry and manufacturing customers who rely on our industrial3D printers. We are proud to be the first industrial 3D printer to fully integrate the latest of Siemens control, sensing and motion technologies and this new MindSphere technology, which will give our customers a new level of control and plant integration.”

We are proud to further strengthen our partnership with ExOne and advance the industrialization of additive manufacturing. Siemens brings new digital technologies and its profound industrial domain know-how to help ExOne generate further value. The new ExOne S-Max Pro™3D printer proves that seamlessly integrated software and automation solutions result in shorter time-to-market, higher performance, and maximum availability.”

 

ExOne Licenses Method of 3D Printing Lightweight Ceramic-Metal from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Logo: Siemens Claim: Ingenuity for life home