3D printed parts save MONEY

Fab lab hub for 3D Printing

Posted on Updated on

The brightest minds in DigiFab learning to expand your interaction with innovative education and workforce training communities!

According to Fab Lab Hub founder Sarah Boisvert who organizes the conference, “DigiFabCon is thrilled to be in Pittsburgh with its vibrant additive manufacturing community and engaged STEM ecosystem. America Makes recognizes that a trained workforce is essential to the adoption of new disruptive technologies and their new programs that include certifications and Digital Badges are key to Industry 4.0’s success”.

Advertisements

The wire feed 3D printing

Posted on Updated on

According to researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory Andrzej Nycz and Voestalpine Böhler Welding, “We achieved a precise geometry for the components by using real-time feedback sensors to correct for abnormalities. Because metal printed walls represent the basic building blocks of parts manufactured with big area additive manufacturing, we expect the same stable properties to hold for parts printed with complex geometries. Not so heavy metal. A good example is wire-feed 3D printing. Mechanical postprocessing like milling and lathing is almost always necessary. Typical fields of applications are automotive, aerospace, shipbuilding, tool making as well as service and maintenance. This additive manufacturing (AM) technique is finding favor in industries like aerospace and heavy equipment, where oversized, monolithic structures are desirable.

The Additive Report has posted numerous stories on wire-feed AM systems in the past two months.
Metallic 3D Printing (M3DP) is a Wire and Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) process and works with a plasma arc and welding wire. The plasma torch is moved by a CNC gantry system along an arbitrary path and creates a weld pool on a substrate plate. A material deposition is achieved by adding wire into the weld pool. The desired part can be generated by putting one deposition over the previous one”.

https://www.voestalpine.com

https://www.ornl.gov

Air NZ uses a 3D printer for speedy

Posted on Updated on

Air NZ uses a 3D printer for speedy. According to Air New Zealand,” has teamed up with components and systems provider Moog, Microsoft and ST Engineering on a world-first experiment which has the potential to transform aerospace supply chains by leveraging 3D printing and Moog’s blockchain enabled VeriPart™ process to create a point of use, time of need a digital supply chain.

The proof of concept has seen Air New Zealand order a digital aircraft part file from Singapore-based ST Engineering. The digital file was immediately sent to an approved printer, operated by Moog in Los Angeles, downloaded and 3D printed before being installed within hours on an Air New Zealand Boeing 777-300 aircraft ahead of its scheduled departure”.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz

3D Printing News Alert(3D Printers for larger parts production)

Posted on Updated on

According to Max Lobovsky, CEO and co-founder of Formlabs, “The printers also feature a new process the company calls Low Force Stereolithography (LFS), an advanced form of stereolithography that “delivers consistently flawless parts by adapting to your part’s geometry to deliver the perfect balance of detail and speed. We entered the industry seven years ago with the first powerful, affordable desktop SLA 3D printer, and since then have shipped more than 40,000 printers, and our customers have printed more than 40 million parts. Now users are leading the way in how to grow 3D printing from one machine to many, from prototyping tool to game changer. We’re excited to take another huge leap forward with LFS 3D printing.”

3D Printers Eyes

Posted on Updated on

3D Printers Eyes. ‘Machine Learning’ will give 3D Printers eyes.
According to Randy Rausch, a senior engineer in embedded computing at GE Research, “Through the integration of edge computing, we have given the 3D printer ‘digital eyes’ to track each layer of every build. We want the manufacturer to know in real time whether a part build is good or has to be scrapped. We already have come so far working closely with GE Additive,” Rausch says. What’s allowing us to move so fast is both the digital and physical expertise we’re bringing to their technology”.

https://www.ge.com/research/newsroom/laser-focus-machine-learning-will-give-3d-printers-eyes

3D Printer will Recycle Plastic in Space

Posted on Updated on

According to NASA, “The Refabricator on the International Space Station is a hybrid 3D printer that can also recycle materials to make new items. This technology could prove useful for future exploration missions to the Moon and Mars”.

http://www.nasa.gov/iss-science

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/centers/marshall/combination-3d-printer-will-recycle-plastic-in-space.html

Eckhart’s smart factory floor solutions using 3D printing

Posted on Updated on

According to Stratasys Eckhart,” is a leader in Industry 4.0 innovation, providing advanced solutions that streamline the harsh manufacturing environment. Eckhart provides solutions to some of the largest manufacturers in the world, designing tools, equipment, and automation that improve the life of the people tasked with running the line”.

 

https://embed.vidyard.com

 

3D Printing aids for ‘Arthritis’ Patients

Posted on Updated on

Arthritis is not only based on age anybody can have ‘Arthritis’ at any age.
In my opinion, research can change the bases of age.
I have seen so many young age people have ‘Arthritis’.
Nobody wants to talk about and they hide because. Arthritis is commonly used for old age diseases. According to the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, “By 2040, more than a quarter of the U.S. population will have diagnosed arthritic conditions. Adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions earn less than average yet have medical care expenditures that are over 12% of average household income. Adaptive aids can help arthritis patients continue to maintain independence and quality of life; however, their high costs limit accessibility for older people and the poor. One method used for consumer price reduction is distributed manufacturing with 3-D printers. In order to assess if such a method would be financially beneficial, this study evaluates the techno-economic viability of distributed manufacturing of adaptive aids for arthritis patients”.

https://www.mdpi.com/2308-3417/3/4/89

https://theconversation.com/why-you-should-give-your-grandparents-a-3d-printer-for-christmas-108657

Mustang Shelby GT500 with 3D printed brake parts

Posted on Updated on

Ford Mustang Shelby GT500-Dual-Clutch or 10-Speed Automatic.
According to Ford, it is “using 3D printing in the manufacturing world, bridging the gap between abstract and practical.” The company is “fully invested in the latest commercial 3D printing innovations.”
Pricing for the 2018 Ford Shelby Super Snake starts at $113,445, including the donor Mustang.
2019 Shelby GT500 Top Speed is Over 200 MPH. The S197 generation of the Ford Mustang in Shelby GT500 form could top 202 miles per hour (325 km/h) at the Nardo test track in Italy.

The Super Snake, available with an automatic or manual transmission, begins as a Mustang GT with its 5.0-liter V-8, but a supercharger and tuning kick it up to a claimed 670 horsepower. Pay extra for a Whipple or Kenne Bell supercharger, and Shelby claims the engine will generate up to 750 horsepower.

http://www.autonews.com/article/20181204/OEM01/181209873/mustang-shelby-gt-ford-3d-augmented-reality-michigan

https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/2018/12/04/shelby-mustang-ford-manufacturing-parts/2205519002/

https://corporate.ford.com/homepage.html