3D Print University

Three Guinness World Records related to the largest 3D printer

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According to Sen. Susan Collins, “I was delighted to join UMaine’s celebration unveiling the world’s largest 3D printer and largest 3D-printed object. The future of the [UMaine] Composites Center is bright, thanks to the excellent working relationship between UMaine, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many other federal agencies, which will support next-generation, large-scale additive manufacturing with biobased thermoplastics. As a senior member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I helped secure $20 million for this exciting collaboration, and an additional $20 million is included in the committee-approved energy funding bill. By working together, UMaine and Oak Ridge will strengthen environmentally responsible advanced manufacturing throughout America, as well as the forest-products industry in Maine.”

According to Sen. Angus King, “Maine is the most forested state in the nation, and now we have a 3D printer big enough to make use of this bountiful resource. Today marks the latest innovative investment in Maine’s forest economy, which will serve to increase sustainability, advance the future of biobased manufacturing and diversify our forest products industry. This is a huge opportunity for the state of Maine, and I’m grateful to everyone — especially the the University of Maine and the FOR/Maine initiative — for their work to make this day a reality.”

According to U.S. Rep. Jared Golden, “As we saw today, the University of Maine Composites Center does award-winning, cutting-edge research that makes Maine proud and will bring jobs to our state. Their work, like the boat and 3D printer we’re here to see, has impressive potential to change how we make things out of all sorts of materials — including Maine wood fiber. Today is about three Guinness World Records, but it’s also about celebrating the innovation that will help protect and create good-paying Maine jobs in forest products and manufacturing.”

According to Moe Khaleel, associate laboratory director for Energy and Environmental Sciences at ORNL, “This is an exciting achievement in our partnership with the University of Maine. This new equipment will accelerate application and integration of our fundamental materials science, plant genomics and manufacturing research to the development of new sustainable bioderived composites, creating economic opportunity for Maine’s forest products industry and the nation.”

UMaine Composites Center receives three Guinness World Records related to largest 3D printer

World’s largest 3D printed boat

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4D Bio3 Technology Edit

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According to Uniformed Services University and NASA, “Using 3D biological printers to produce usable human organs has long been a dream of scientists and doctors around the globe. However, printing the tiny, complex structures found inside human organs, such as capillary structures, has proven difficult to accomplish in Earth’s gravity environment. To overcome this challenge, Techshot designed its BioFabrication Facility (BFF) to print organ-like tissues in microgravity, acting as a stepping stone in a long-term plan to manufacture whole human organs in space using refined biological 3D printing techniques.”

 

The University of Rhode Island

BioFabrication Facility

3D printed a “rabbit-sized” heart

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According to BIOLIFE4D, “We have developed a proprietary bioink using a very specific composition of different extracellular matrix compounds that closely replicate the properties of the mammalian heart. Further, it has developed a novel and unique bioprinting algorithm, consisting of printing parameters optimized for the whole heart. Coupling its proprietary bioink with patient-derived cardiomyocytes and its enabling bioprinting technology, BIOLIFE4D is able to bioprint a heart that, while smaller in size, replicates many of the features of a human heart. With this platform technology in place, BIOLIFE4D is now well-positioned to build upon this platform and work towards the development of a full-scale human heart.”

 

BIOLIFE4D Just 3D Printed A Human ‘Mini-Heart’

BIOLIFE4D Reaches Groundbreaking Milestone and Successfully 3D Bioprints a Mini-Heart

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The better way to 3D print organs

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According to the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and co-first author Mark Skylar-Scott, Ph.D., a Research Associate at the Wyss Institute, “This is an entirely new paradigm for tissue fabrication. Rather than trying to 3D-print an entire organ’s worth of cells, SWIFT (sacrificial writing into functional tissue) )focuses on only printing the vessels necessary to support a living tissue construct that contains large quantities of OBBs, which may ultimately be used therapeutically to repair and replace human organs with lab-grown versions containing patients’ own cells.”

A Swifter Way Towards 3D-printed Organs

Latest Harvard Gazette News

A swifter way towards 3D-printed organs

Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology

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According to C. Anandharamakrishnan, Director of IIFPT and corresponding author of the paper published in the Food and Bioprocess Technology., “The printer is approximately the size of a mixie, weighing below 8 kg and can be carried around. It was also indigenously developed and completely fabricated in India. This brings down the cost to less than Rs.75,000, while most printers in the market are expensive and cannot be conveniently used for multi-material food printing applications.”

Get ready for 3D-printed cookies

Indian Institute of Food Processing Technology

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

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A 3D-printed transparent skull implant.
According to Suhasa Kodandaramaiah, Ph.D., a co-author of the study and University of Minnesota Benjamin Mayhugh Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the College of Science and Engineering “What we are trying to do is to see if we can visualize and interact with large parts of the mouse brain surface, called the cortex, over long periods of time. This will give us new information about how the human brain works. This technology allows us to see most of the cortex in action with unprecedented control and precision while stimulating certain parts of the brain.”

According to Kodandaramaiah and Ebner, the research team was led by fourth-year mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Leila Ghanbari. The research team included several post-doctoral associates, graduate students and undergraduate students including Russell E. Carter (neuroscience), Matthew L. Rynes (biomedical engineering), Judith Dominguez (mechanical engineering), Gang Chen (neuroscience), Anant Naik (biomedical engineering), Jia Hu (biomedical engineering), Lenora Haltom (mechanical engineering), Nahom Mossazghi (neuroscience), Madelyn M. Gray (neuroscience) and Sarah L. West (neuroscience). The team also included partners at the University of Wisconsin including researcher Kevin W. Eliceiri and graduate student Md Abdul Kader Sagar, “This new device allows us to look at the brain activity at the smallest level zooming in on specific neurons while getting a big-picture view of a large part of the brain surface over time. Developing the device and showing that it works is just the beginning of what we will be able to do to advance brain research.”

A 3D-printed transparent skull implant

University of Minnesota block M and wordmark

Research Brief: 3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain

Transparent 3D-Printed Skull Implant Opens New Window for Brain Researchers

Johnston Uses 3D Printing to Meet Needs of Alzheimer’s Center Residents

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The chancellor of UAFS College of Applied Science and Technology’s 3D printing lab Dr. Terisa Riley and Methodist Village CEO Melissa Curry,” develop an initial set of 3D-printed nuts and bolts to aid residents’ cognitive stimulation.
The faculty at UAFS are deeply skilled, both as educators and as experts in their fields. It’s exciting to see our mission as a comprehensive regional institution fulfilled in their commitment to serving the citizens of the River Valley through innovative partnerships like these. When planning for our Alzheimer’s Special Care Community, we knew it was important to have the right sensory stimulation. They also mention We ordered life-like robotic cats and dogs for allergen-free pet therapy and installed interactive art throughout the halls.”

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Johnston Uses 3D Printing to Meet Needs of Alzheimer’s Center Residents

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3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

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Kijenzi is one of many ventures in the Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship program that approaches real-world issues with Penn State know-how.