3D Print University

Johnston Uses 3D Printing to Meet Needs of Alzheimer’s Center Residents

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The chancellor of UAFS College of Applied Science and Technology’s 3D printing lab Dr. Terisa Riley and Methodist Village CEO Melissa Curry,” develop an initial set of 3D-printed nuts and bolts to aid residents’ cognitive stimulation.
The faculty at UAFS are deeply skilled, both as educators and as experts in their fields. It’s exciting to see our mission as a comprehensive regional institution fulfilled in their commitment to serving the citizens of the River Valley through innovative partnerships like these. When planning for our Alzheimer’s Special Care Community, we knew it was important to have the right sensory stimulation. They also mention We ordered life-like robotic cats and dogs for allergen-free pet therapy and installed interactive art throughout the halls.”

https://uafs.edu.

https://news.uafs.edu/news/5146

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3D printers in or near rural health facilities

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According to HESE director John Gershenson, “For too long, people have lacked access to appropriate medical care just because of where they were born. Now, the entire world will know that Penn Staters are helping to right that wrong. We’ve been exploring the idea of installing these 3D printers in or near rural health facilities, training staff members and local entrepreneurs there how to use them and creating the necessary support systems. If these facilities can make those hard-to-get items for themselves, they could keep running their facility the way they need to rather than having to import everything from other countries.”

For rural areas in Kenya, healthcare accessibility has been and continues to be, a growing concern—one that the Kijenzi venture hopes to solve by providing accessible and affordable medical education tools.

According to Ben Savonen, “this is a very experimental project, but, as some of the components of its work out, it will have a huge impact.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2tg

https://www.psu.edu/feature/2018/06/18/3d-printing-purpose

Sand 3D Printer before and now

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According to Sculpteo, “Binder Jetting printers spread a layer of the material and then bind it with an agent, which solidifies the particles. A layer for sand 3D printer is 140-200 micrometers.”
According to Markus Kayser,” he talks about ‘desert manufacturing’: a combination of solar power and 3D printing to create objects made entirely out of the sand. As a product designer, he has created a variety of beautiful objects only using the sun and sand.”
According to ExOne’s digital part materialization,” (3D printing) process for printing sand casting molds and cores, beginning with a digital file, going through solidification analysis, printing and finally casting a finished industrial part.”
Comments 4 years ago,
also side topic, I still think bricks made from lava would be a good cheap way to get building materials, you could scoop lava into brick molds with industrial robots and also if you push a magnetic field thru the lave as it cools you could leave a build signature in the structure, that could be used in the future to date and specify where it was made sort of like a bar code but magnetic. but still, lava is still a good material that is underused.
According to AFS MCTV, “I want to see it get to the point where a 3D printer in a desert would be able to print the components for another printer.
This webinar covers the basics of additive manufacturing as well as explains the technology used to create molds and cores with a 3D printer. Led by Dave Rittmeyer and Steve Murray, both of Hoosier Pattern, the webinar will give attendees full access to two industry veterans who have worked in metal casting for a combined 50 years. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, learn from industry experts and see examples of how 3D printed sand has been used within the metal casting industry.”
According to Meimad3, “World’s largest commercial 3D printer (printing volume 4x2x1 meters) – for printing Sand-Cast mold parts for the metal cast.”
According to General Foundry Service, “3d Printed Sand Molds.”
The webinar will cover the basics and explore how to utilize 3D printed sand components on your next project.
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7 months ago
You could print big columns in low spots to serve as pilings. Then, you can cap the area with a walking machine so the structure doesn’t get buried. Over time, the additional capped ground will develop a white color which reflects the sun. You could print tunnels and bury them so they stay cool.
The 3rd Sand Printer is Here!
https://wp.me/s64ptu-9486

 

https://www.sculpteo.com/blog/2019/07/17/is-a-sand-3d-printer-the-future-of-additive-manufacturing/?

3D-printable magnetic Droplets devices

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According to a team of scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), “Scientists Print 3D-printable liquid magnetic droplets devices.
This is a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. Their findings could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.”
According to Tom Russell, a visiting faculty scientist at Berkeley Lab and professor of polymer science and engineering at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, “We’ve made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic. No one has ever observed this before. This opens the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter.”

 

New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets

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https://www.massachusetts.edu/

3D printing startup company Fortify raises $10 million

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The Fortify was founded on research on composite 3D printing by Randall Erb and Joshua Martin at Northeastern University. Their goal was to enable quick and seamless fabrication of composites with optimized microstructures. Through their research, they invented magnetic 3D printing or Fluxprint.
Fluxprint makes high-performance materials accessible. It’s a patented magnetic 3D printing process that creates optimized composites.
Fluxprint combines magnetics and digital light processing (DLP) 3D printing to produce composite parts with ideal mechanical properties”.

https://www.northeastern.edu/

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What is Fluxprint?

Industrial 3D printing startup Fortify raises $10 million

Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component

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Pitt Engineers Receive $1 Million for 3D printed turbine component. The three-year project has received additional support from the University of Pittsburgh ($200,600), resulting in a total grant of $1,003,000.

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry today announced that the Department of Energy will award 113 grants totaling $121 million to 103 small businesses in 29 states.

According to Albert and Dr.Xiayun (Sharon) Zhao, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt, “LPBF AM is capable of making complex metal components with the reduced cost of material and time. There is a desire to employ the appealing AM technology to fabricate sophisticated HGPTCs that can withstand higher working temperature for next-generation turbines. However, because there’s a possibility that the components will have porous defects and be prone to detrimental thermomechanical fatigue, it’s critical to have a good quality assurance method before putting them to use. The quality assurance framework we are developing will immensely reduce the cost of testing and quality control and enhance confidence in adopting the LPBF process to fabricate demanding HGPTCs.”

 

 

https://www.engineering.pitt.edu/News/2019/DOE-Grant-for-3D-Printed-Turbine-Components/

Supersonic Jet’s Nanoscale Additive Manufacturing

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Supersonic Jet’s Nanoscale Additive Manufacturing. According to professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology Andrei Fedorov,” we are controlling matter on the atomic scale to bring about new modes of additive manufacturing. This new science could bring about additive manufacturing applications that might otherwise be impossible. The resulting new technology will open up new dimensions for additive manufacturing at the atomic scale.
When we went to the lab to use nanofabrication with focused electron beams, which are the size of a few nanometers, we could not grow structures that were just a few nanometers. They grew to be 50 or 100 nanometers. And it also took a long time to produce the structures, which meant that, without improvements, we’d never be able to produce them at high volume.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/622941/original

 

 

https://www.machinedesign.com/3d-printing/supersonic-gas-speeds-nanoscale-3d-printing

https://www.news.gatech.edu/2019/07/02/tiny-supersonic-jet-injector-accelerates-nanoscale-additive-manufacturing

Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing

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Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing.
According to Angela Christiano, Ph.D., the Richard & Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, “Our previous studies implicated JAK-STAT signaling as one potential new therapeutic pathway for hair loss disorders by targeting hair follicle stem cells with JAK inhibitors. A biotech company recently reported results of a small phase 2 trial of a topical JAK-STAT inhibitor based on these studies. Here, we show that blocking the source of the JAK activating signal outside the hair follicle is another way to target this mechanism.”

 

 

https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/studies-uncover-new-approaches-combat-hair-loss-men-and-women

https://www.cuimc.columbia

Beyond nature, 3D printed Wood tissue

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According to the Professor Paul Gatenholm, who has led this research within Chalmers University of Technology’s Wallenberg Wood Science Centre and researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden,” have succeeded in 3D printing with a wood-based ink in a way that mimics the unique ‘ultrastructure’ of wood. Their research could revolutionize the manufacturing of green products. Through emulating the natural cellular architecture of wood, they now present the ability to create green products derived from trees, with unique properties – everything from clothes, packaging, and furniture to healthcare and personal care products.
This is a breakthrough in manufacturing technology. It allows us to move beyond the limits of nature, to create new sustainable, green products. It means that those products which today are already forest-based can now be 3D printed, in a much shorter time. And the metals and plastics currently used in 3D printing can be replaced with a renewable, sustainable alternative.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352940718304918?via%3Dihub#fig0025

http://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/chem/news/Pages/Mimicking-the-ultrastructure-of-wood-with-3D-printing-for-green-products.aspx

https://newatlas.com/wood-nanocellulose-3d-printing/60347/

3D printed resistive soft sensors

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According to related publications from Shih B., Christianson C., Gillespie K., Lee S., Mayeda J., Huo Z., Tolley M. T. (2019), “Design considerations for 3D printed, soft, multi-material resistive sensors for soft robotics. Frontiers in Robotics and AISubmersible robots are finding ever-increasing uses in search and rescue, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. Artificial muscles made out of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) provide an attractive choice for driving submersible robotics based on their high energy density, lightweight, and efficiency. One challenge for most DEAs is that that they require conductive electrodes that are made out of materials that are challenging to the pattern, opaque, and/or add stiffness to the devices.”

 

 

https://sites.google.com/eng.ucsd.edu/bioinspired/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vxUw_KLXNnTDJvj2UAQSwp7zPBFQ-061/view

Cellulose-Based, 3D Printed IoT Sensors

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According to Simon Fraser University professor Woo Soo Kim, “this novel wireless chemical sensing platform technology will usher various sensing applications such as biomedical or environmental detection.
If we are able to change the plastics in PCB to cellulose composite materials, recycling of metal components on the board could be collected in a much easier way.”

According to Wiley Online Library, “A 3D printable conductive ink is designed and optimized with cellulose nanofibers by addition of silver nanowires for sustainable and biocompatible sensor applications. Polyimide film which has high surface hydrophobicity is used as a substrate for better resolution of printing.”

https://www.thomasnet.com/insights/researchers-develop-cellulose-based-3d-printed-iot-sensors/

https://www.sfu.ca/mechatronics/people/faculty/woosoo_kim.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/aelm.201800778