3D Printing and healthcare

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3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

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According to A. Fatih Sarioglu, an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)“Isolating circulating tumor cells from whole blood samples has been a challenge because we are looking for a handful of cancer cells mixed with billions of normal red and white blood cells. With this device, we can process a clinically-relevant volume of blood by capturing nearly all of the white blood cells and then filtering out the red blood cells by size. That leaves us with undamaged tumor cells that can be sequenced to determine the specific cancer type and the unique characteristics of each patient’s tumor.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/628242/original

 

3D-Printed Device Finds ‘Needle in a Haystack’ Cancer Cells by Removing the Hay

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

3D printing used to make glass optical fiber preform

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According to Science News and John Canning who led the research team from the University of Technology in Sydney, “Making silica optical fiber involves the labor-intensive process of spinning tubes on a lathe, which requires the fiber’s core or cores to be precisely centered. With additive manufacturing, there’s no need for the fiber geometry to be centered. This removes one of the greatest limitations in fiber design and greatly reduces the cost of fiber manufacturing.
Additive manufacturing approaches such as 3D printing are well suited to change the entire approach to fiber design and purpose. This could, for example, broaden the applications of fiber optic sensors, which far outperform electronic equivalents in terms of longevity, calibration and maintenance but haven’t been widely deployed due to their expensive fabrication.”

 

3D printing used to make glass optical fiber preform

the University of New South Wales

 

 

3D printing’s transformative power

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Merck proves 3D printing’s transformative power.
According to Michele D’Alessandro, vice president and CIO of manufacturing IT at Merck & Co, “Over the past four years, Merck has increasingly leveraged advancements in Additive Manufacturing (3D printing) to establish state-of-the art capabilities aimed to enable and drive innovation across our enterprise.”

 

Merck proves 3D printing’s transformative power

Merck