3D Print Biotechnology and medicine articles

BRECA Health Care

Posted on Updated on

According to BRECA Health Care,” is a biomedical engineering company that uses 3D printing technologies, computer aided design, reverse engineering and computational validation in order to develop state of the art custom made products and solutions in the healthcare sector. We are pioneers in the development of 3D bioprinting systems that are fundamental for the community of research in the development of new pharmaceuticals and advanced therapies. We are proud to say that we are helping to shape the future of medicine.”

BRECA Health Care

Advertisements

TRILUMINATE Pivotal Study for Abbott’s TriClip device

Posted on Updated on

According to Professor Georg Nickenig, lead investigator of the study and chair of Internal Medicine and Polyclinic II at the University of Bonn, Germany, presented findings. Data show a TR reduction of at least one grade in 87 percent of patients with symptomatic or greater TR and improvements in quality-of-life, “The TriClip is a version of the MitraClip used for transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) to resolve mitral regurgitation. A post hoc registry analysis of MitraClip use for TR has indicated TR reduction and improved clinical outcomes out to one year. Treatment for TR is currently limited to the use of diuretics and high-risk surgical procedures. Nickenig said minimally invasive catheter-based procedures (such as TriClip) may reduce TR with low procedural risk.”

 

TriClip Device For Tricuspid Regurgitation Effective at One Year in TRILUMINATE Study

3D Printing For Cardiology

Posted on Updated on

According to Dee Dee Wang, M.D., director, structural heart imaging at Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit,” explains how her center uses 3-D printing and computer-aided design (CAD) software to improve patient outcomes. She spoke to DAIC at the 2017 Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) annual meeting. ‘The Use of 3-D Printing in Cardiology’ and “Henry Ford Hospital Study Shows 3-D Imaging Improves Fixing Broken Hearts.”

According to Rob Beanlands, M.D., FASNC, 2019 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) president, shares a couple of trends he sees in cardiac nuclear imaging. He is the Vered Chair and division head of cardiology and director of the National Cardiac PET Centre at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Canada. He said,” overall trends he sees in nuclear cardiology include the use of better myocardial reserve quantification so it is clear whether revascularization would help patients. Beanlands also said there is increasing interest in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging because of its superior image quality and increasing access to PET radiotracers. New tracers on the horizon will also increase the image quality and flexibility of PET to accommodate exercise stress.”

 

The Future of 3-D Printing in Medicine

VIDEO: Applications in Cardiology for 3-D Printing and Computer-Aided Design

VIDEO: Better Flow Quantification and Rise of PET Among Trends in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging

Risk factors for osteoporosis and treatment adherence with osteoporosis medications

Posted on Updated on

According to New York-Presbyterian Hospital Endocrinology,” She has published widely in the medical literature and is co-editor of the book, The Bone and Mineral Manual.Dr. Siris served as the Medical Director of NORA, the National Osteoporosis Risk Assessment, a public health initiative and longitudinal study of osteoporosis that included over 200,000 postmenopausal women in the US. Most recently her research activity has focused both on risk factors for osteoporosis and treatment adherence with osteoporosis medications. Siris has been interviewed frequently on both television and radio and is often quoted in print media regarding osteoporosis.”

 

The Osteoporosis Manual: Prevention, Diagnosis, and Management

Ethel S. Siris, MD

 

3-D Printed heart model and surgeons information

Posted on Updated on

According to NewYork-Presbyterian,” Dr. Farooqi went on to complete an advanced imaging fellowship at Kravis Children’s Hospital, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr. Farooqi’s research focuses on the use of 3D printed and digital cardiac models to improve care for patients with congenital heart disease. She was granted the Glorney Raisbeck Fellowship Award by the New York Academy of Medicine to identify the optimal cardiac MRI sequences in creating 3D models. Prior to joining Columbia, Dr. Farooqi was a full-time faculty member at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School for two years and led the pediatric cardiology service for the University Hospital in Newark.”

 

3-D PRINTED HEART MODELS GIVE SURGEONS VITAL INFORMATION ABOUT A HEART’S ANATOMY

Rapid Prototyping in Cardiac Disease: 3D Printing the Heart 

Kanwal M. Farooqi, MD

 

NC STATE STUDENTS LAUNCH 3D PRINTING OF PROSTHETIC DEVICES

Posted on Updated on

NC State students launch 3D printing of prosthetic devices.
According to Helping Hand Project President Griffin Drye said, “A general prosthetic might cost between $10,000-20,000, and a kid grows out of that in six months. Each device we print costs between $50-100 to actually produce.”

NC STATE STUDENTS LAUNCH GOFUNDME TO HELP FUND 3D PRINTING OF PROSTHETIC DEVICES FOR CHILDREN IN NEED

The Helping Hand Project at NC State