3D Printing with Nanomaterials, Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Robotics, Oculus

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels

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According to Pankaj Karande, an associate professor of chemical and biological engineering and a member of the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies (CBIS), who led this research at Rensselaer, “Right now, whatever is available as a clinical product is more like a fancy Band-Aid. It provides some accelerated wound healing, but eventually it just falls off; it never really integrates with the host cells.”

RENSSELAER

Living Skin Can Now be 3D-Printed With Blood Vessels Included

3D Printing technique and nanoscale fabrication

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According to Sourabh Saha, the paper’s lead and corresponding author is now an assistant professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, “Instead of using a single point of light, we project a million points simultaneously. This scales up the process dramatically because instead of working with a single point that has to be scanned to create the structure, we can use an entire plane of projected light. Instead of focusing on a single point, we have an entire focused plane that can be patterned into arbitrary structures.”

https://www.news.gatech.edu/hg/image/627104/original

 

3D Printing Technique Accelerates Nanoscale Fabrication a Thousandfold

3D bioprinting of tissues and organs

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According to Yehiel Tal, the Chief Executive Officer of CollPlant, “This fund raising is intended to support the advancement of our pipeline in the fields of medical aesthetics and 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs. We are now focused on facilitating our development programs of dermal fillers and regenerative breast implants. Our collaboration with United Therapeutics, which is using our BioInk technology for 3D printing lungs, is progressing, and we continue to expand our business collaborations with large international healthcare companies that seek to implement our revolutionary regenerative medicine technology. We are very pleased to have entered into this transaction with Mr. Sagi and the other investors.”

 

CollPlant Biotechnologies Raising $5.5 Million

3D printed a “rabbit-sized” heart

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According to BIOLIFE4D, “We have developed a proprietary bioink using a very specific composition of different extracellular matrix compounds that closely replicate the properties of the mammalian heart. Further, it has developed a novel and unique bioprinting algorithm, consisting of printing parameters optimized for the whole heart. Coupling its proprietary bioink with patient-derived cardiomyocytes and its enabling bioprinting technology, BIOLIFE4D is able to bioprint a heart that, while smaller in size, replicates many of the features of a human heart. With this platform technology in place, BIOLIFE4D is now well-positioned to build upon this platform and work towards the development of a full-scale human heart.”

 

BIOLIFE4D Just 3D Printed A Human ‘Mini-Heart’

BIOLIFE4D Reaches Groundbreaking Milestone and Successfully 3D Bioprints a Mini-Heart

https://english.tau.ac.il/

Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing

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Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing.
According to Angela Christiano, Ph.D., the Richard & Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, “Our previous studies implicated JAK-STAT signaling as one potential new therapeutic pathway for hair loss disorders by targeting hair follicle stem cells with JAK inhibitors. A biotech company recently reported results of a small phase 2 trial of a topical JAK-STAT inhibitor based on these studies. Here, we show that blocking the source of the JAK activating signal outside the hair follicle is another way to target this mechanism.”

 

 

https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/studies-uncover-new-approaches-combat-hair-loss-men-and-women

https://www.cuimc.columbia

3D printed resistive soft sensors

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According to related publications from Shih B., Christianson C., Gillespie K., Lee S., Mayeda J., Huo Z., Tolley M. T. (2019), “Design considerations for 3D printed, soft, multi-material resistive sensors for soft robotics. Frontiers in Robotics and AISubmersible robots are finding ever-increasing uses in search and rescue, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. Artificial muscles made out of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) provide an attractive choice for driving submersible robotics based on their high energy density, lightweight, and efficiency. One challenge for most DEAs is that that they require conductive electrodes that are made out of materials that are challenging to the pattern, opaque, and/or add stiffness to the devices.”

 

 

https://sites.google.com/eng.ucsd.edu/bioinspired/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vxUw_KLXNnTDJvj2UAQSwp7zPBFQ-061/view

3D Printing News Alert(For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene)

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Graphene is strong, light, thin and flexible. It is the thinnest substance capable of conducting electricity, is an efficient thermal conductor and is optically transparent. Graphene is also more resistant to tearing than steel and is almost impermeable.

For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene.

According to GrapheneCa Head of Business Development David Robles,” Proactive Investors to discuss the technology company that is integrating graphene into the real world using their own environmentally friendly production process.

Robles telling Proactive about the company’s revenue streams and when they are expecting to be profitable.”

According to Hodge,” Adding graphene to plastic composites can improve the tensile strength and stiffness of packaging. Graphene won’t make the material indestructible but it may be possible to reduce packaging size while maintaining the same properties. This has obvious advantages for transporting fragile goods and may also contribute to recycling. Today, recycling plastics degrades the quality of the plastic – it can be recycled an average of three times, but adding graphene to recycled plastics can improve its strength so that it can be recycled many times more. Because they are printed, [the capacitive touch sensors] can be any size or shape and printed in volume.”

According to Chris Jones, technical manager at Novalia, a partner in the EU’s Graphene Flagship, “Our mission statement is to make technology disappear into everyday items.
The ink is supplied by Researchers at the University of Cambridge, University of Manchester and produced by micro fluidization.”

According to Francesca Rosella, co-founder of CuteCircuit, “A dress was designed to illustrate the material’s strength, transparency, and conductivity. The shape and decoration of the dress represent the design of a graphene crystal. We examined graphene under a microscope to see the hexagonal structure and enlarged it to help people understand graphene’s molecular structure.”

According to the TechRadar, “Mobile warming the graphene jacket can also conduct electricity, but creator Vollebak has decided to dampen down this ability to protect wearers. Prototypes of the jacket were so conductive that the wearer could hold a battery in one hand and a light bulb in the other, and have the bulb light up, but Vollebak decided that, although interesting, it was best to play it safe and make the material a little more resistant.”

According to Researchers at Osaka Universities co-author Kazuhiko Matsumoto,” Our biosensor enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of bacteria that cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer by limiting its reaction in a well-defined microvolume. They have invented a new biosensor using graphene, which is a material that consists of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to detect bacteria like those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact with the biosensor, chemical reactions are triggered which are detected by graphene. To enable detection of the chemical reaction products, the researchers used microfluidics to contain the bacteria in tiny droplets that are close to the surface of the sensor.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2qz

 

https://youtu.be/IesIsKMjB4Y

 

 

https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2019/06/graphene-what-is-it-good-for/

https://www.techradar.com/news/with-this-graphene-jacket-youll-never-be-too-hot-too-cold-or-too-smelly

https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/22914/20190622/using-graphene-and-tiny-droplets-to-detect-stomach-cancer-causing-bacteria.htm

3-D print colloidal crystals

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According to Mechanosynthesis Group, MIT, “Highlights from our publication on direct-write colloidal assembly, a new fabrication process combining principles of self-assembly with 3D printing.3-D print colloidal crystals.”
According to study co-author Alvin Tan, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, “If you blew up each particle to the size of a soccer ball, it would be like stacking a whole lot of soccer balls to make something as tall as a skyscraper. That’s what we’re doing at the nanoscale.
If you could 3-D print a circuit that manipulates photons instead of electrons, that could pave the way for future applications in light-based computing, that manipulate light instead of electricity so that devices can be faster and more energy efficient.
According to graduate student Justin Beroz, assistant professor of mechanical engineering Mathias Kolle, and an associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart. For the first time, we’ve shown that it’s possible to build macroscale self-assembled colloidal materials, and we expect this technique can build any 3-D shape, and be applied to an incredible variety of materials. Mr.Hart, the senior author of the paper.”

 

 

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-researchers-3-d-print-colloidal-crystals-0830

3D Printed Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber

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According to Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center, “it records the test-firing of a 3D-printed combustion chamber. Researchers are exploring advanced additive manufacturing solutions, introducing higher-performing alloys and refined printing processes.”
We are curious, so from some comments,
3D printed? From what material? How?
What kind of printer? Is there a video of printing this engine?
How does one hemisphere constitute one chamber?

 

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2019/nasa-and-virgin-orbit-3d-print-test-rocket-combustion-chamber.html.