3D Printing with Nanomaterials, Artificial Intelligence, Virtual Reality, Robotics, Oculus

Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing

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Growing human hair in a dish using 3D printing.
According to Angela Christiano, Ph.D., the Richard & Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, “Our previous studies implicated JAK-STAT signaling as one potential new therapeutic pathway for hair loss disorders by targeting hair follicle stem cells with JAK inhibitors. A biotech company recently reported results of a small phase 2 trial of a topical JAK-STAT inhibitor based on these studies. Here, we show that blocking the source of the JAK activating signal outside the hair follicle is another way to target this mechanism.”

 

 

https://www.cuimc.columbia.edu/news/studies-uncover-new-approaches-combat-hair-loss-men-and-women

https://www.cuimc.columbia

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3D printed resistive soft sensors

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According to related publications from Shih B., Christianson C., Gillespie K., Lee S., Mayeda J., Huo Z., Tolley M. T. (2019), “Design considerations for 3D printed, soft, multi-material resistive sensors for soft robotics. Frontiers in Robotics and AISubmersible robots are finding ever-increasing uses in search and rescue, environmental monitoring, and defense applications. Artificial muscles made out of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) provide an attractive choice for driving submersible robotics based on their high energy density, lightweight, and efficiency. One challenge for most DEAs is that that they require conductive electrodes that are made out of materials that are challenging to the pattern, opaque, and/or add stiffness to the devices.”

 

 

https://sites.google.com/eng.ucsd.edu/bioinspired/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vxUw_KLXNnTDJvj2UAQSwp7zPBFQ-061/view

3D Printing News Alert(For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene)

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Graphene is strong, light, thin and flexible. It is the thinnest substance capable of conducting electricity, is an efficient thermal conductor and is optically transparent. Graphene is also more resistant to tearing than steel and is almost impermeable.

For 3D printing a wonder material for the future, graphene.

According to GrapheneCa Head of Business Development David Robles,” Proactive Investors to discuss the technology company that is integrating graphene into the real world using their own environmentally friendly production process.

Robles telling Proactive about the company’s revenue streams and when they are expecting to be profitable.”

According to Hodge,” Adding graphene to plastic composites can improve the tensile strength and stiffness of packaging. Graphene won’t make the material indestructible but it may be possible to reduce packaging size while maintaining the same properties. This has obvious advantages for transporting fragile goods and may also contribute to recycling. Today, recycling plastics degrades the quality of the plastic – it can be recycled an average of three times, but adding graphene to recycled plastics can improve its strength so that it can be recycled many times more. Because they are printed, [the capacitive touch sensors] can be any size or shape and printed in volume.”

According to Chris Jones, technical manager at Novalia, a partner in the EU’s Graphene Flagship, “Our mission statement is to make technology disappear into everyday items.
The ink is supplied by Researchers at the University of Cambridge, University of Manchester and produced by micro fluidization.”

According to Francesca Rosella, co-founder of CuteCircuit, “A dress was designed to illustrate the material’s strength, transparency, and conductivity. The shape and decoration of the dress represent the design of a graphene crystal. We examined graphene under a microscope to see the hexagonal structure and enlarged it to help people understand graphene’s molecular structure.”

According to the TechRadar, “Mobile warming the graphene jacket can also conduct electricity, but creator Vollebak has decided to dampen down this ability to protect wearers. Prototypes of the jacket were so conductive that the wearer could hold a battery in one hand and a light bulb in the other, and have the bulb light up, but Vollebak decided that, although interesting, it was best to play it safe and make the material a little more resistant.”

According to Researchers at Osaka Universities co-author Kazuhiko Matsumoto,” Our biosensor enables highly sensitive and quantitative detection of bacteria that cause stomach ulcers and stomach cancer by limiting its reaction in a well-defined microvolume. They have invented a new biosensor using graphene, which is a material that consists of a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to detect bacteria like those that attack the stomach lining and that have been linked to stomach cancer. When the bacteria interact with the biosensor, chemical reactions are triggered which are detected by graphene. To enable detection of the chemical reaction products, the researchers used microfluidics to contain the bacteria in tiny droplets that are close to the surface of the sensor.”

https://wp.me/p64ptu-2qz

 

https://youtu.be/IesIsKMjB4Y

 

 

https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2019/06/graphene-what-is-it-good-for/

https://www.techradar.com/news/with-this-graphene-jacket-youll-never-be-too-hot-too-cold-or-too-smelly

https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/22914/20190622/using-graphene-and-tiny-droplets-to-detect-stomach-cancer-causing-bacteria.htm

3-D print colloidal crystals

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According to Mechanosynthesis Group, MIT, “Highlights from our publication on direct-write colloidal assembly, a new fabrication process combining principles of self-assembly with 3D printing.3-D print colloidal crystals.”
According to study co-author Alvin Tan, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, “If you blew up each particle to the size of a soccer ball, it would be like stacking a whole lot of soccer balls to make something as tall as a skyscraper. That’s what we’re doing at the nanoscale.
If you could 3-D print a circuit that manipulates photons instead of electrons, that could pave the way for future applications in light-based computing, that manipulate light instead of electricity so that devices can be faster and more energy efficient.
According to graduate student Justin Beroz, assistant professor of mechanical engineering Mathias Kolle, and an associate professor of mechanical engineering A. John Hart. For the first time, we’ve shown that it’s possible to build macroscale self-assembled colloidal materials, and we expect this technique can build any 3-D shape, and be applied to an incredible variety of materials. Mr.Hart, the senior author of the paper.”

 

 

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-researchers-3-d-print-colloidal-crystals-0830

3D Printed Rocket Engine Combustion Chamber

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According to Engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center, “it records the test-firing of a 3D-printed combustion chamber. Researchers are exploring advanced additive manufacturing solutions, introducing higher-performing alloys and refined printing processes.”
We are curious, so from some comments,
3D printed? From what material? How?
What kind of printer? Is there a video of printing this engine?
How does one hemisphere constitute one chamber?

 

https://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/news/news/releases/2019/nasa-and-virgin-orbit-3d-print-test-rocket-combustion-chamber.html.

3D printed 5G antenna

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According to Mark Mirotznik, professor of electrical engineering at the University of Delaware,” for technologies like wearables and things like that, it means we don’t have to have flat electronics anymore or flat antennas, it can be flexible. So for those applications, it’s really novel that you can actually print all of this stuff on a flexible membrane. It opens up new possibilities. 3D printing (specifically, NanoParticle Jetting technology offered by XJet) is the only manufacturing technique capable of meeting the production demands of a new kind of passive beam steering 5G antenna designed by his team.”

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Researchers see 5G promise in 3D-printing tech

3D printed Tiny robots

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Tiny robots activated by magnetic fields may be used in future biomedical procedures.
According to Professor Eric Diller (MIE), researchers at the U of T,” they create magnetized microrobots. The size of the head of a pin that can travel through fluid-filled vessels and organs within the human body. Previously, we would prepare one shape and manually design it, spend weeks planning it, before we could fabricate it. And that’s just one shape. Then when we build it, we would inevitably discover specific quirks — for example, we might have to tweak it to be a little bigger or thinner to make it work. If we were taking samples in the urinary tract or within fluid cavities of the brain — we envision that an optimized technique would be instrumental in scaling down surgical robotic tools”.
According to Tianqi Xu, he is MIE MASc candidate, “These robots are quite difficult and labor-intensive to fabricate because the process requires precision. Also because of the need for manual assembly, it’s more difficult to make these robots smaller, which is a major goal of our research”.

 

No assembly required: U of T Engineering researchers automate microrobotic designs

3D Printing News Alert(3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties)

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3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties. The geometry of a moth’s eye provides inspiration for a 3D printed antenna that absorbs specific microwave frequencies from any direction.
According to Sameer Sonkusale, professor of electrical and computer engineering and Aydin Sadeqi, a graduate student in Sankusale’s lab at Tufts University’s School of Engineering who heads the Nano Lab at Tufts and is the corresponding author of the study, “The ability to consolidate functions using metamaterials could be incredibly useful. It’s possible that we could use these materials to reduce the size of spectrometers and other optical measuring devices so they can be designed for portable field study.
The full potential of 3D printing for MEGOs has not yet been realized. There is much more we can do with the current technology, and vast potential as 3D printing inevitably evolves”.

https://now.tufts.edu

Photogrammetry software for 3D Printing

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Photogrammetry software for 3D Printing. According to Sculpteo, “3D scanning could be useful for various applications. It can be used to get a viable 3D model and make the most of the 3D printing technology using an online 3D printing service such as Sculpteo. But having a great 3D design is also an amazing tool for visualization.

Photogrammetry is useful for topographic mapping, architecture, engineering, or even geology! There are a lot of software tools dedicated to aerial photos, photogrammetry is really useful for geographical use. For instance, archeologists are also using it to create plans for complex and remote sites”.

Some of the best free photogrammetry software


Agisoft PhotoScan
3DF Zephyr Free
Colmap
Visual SFM

Paid software

Context Capture
Reality Capture
3DF ZEPHYR
Autodesk ReCap Pro
Inpho
iWitnessPRO
Pix4Dmapper
Photomodeler Pro 5

According to some comments,
“It is still easier to 3D sculpt from scratch than to scan using photogrammetry in some cases. As some 3D sculpting will be needed when cleaning and patching anyway.
Zephyr offers a function where you can upload an mp4 / video file. Pretty cool feature. It does all the things in the video but in one tool. Much easier to use as well. Free is capped at 50 photos.
COLMAP is sooo cool and cheaper smarter alternatives.
Autodesk Recap is paid and limited (I heard that there is a limit number of the image you can upload to their cloud – and it’s the web-based application so if you don’t have internet, you can’t do anything).

Some people like VisualSFM and best software to do this is still pix4d. These are also powerful and free, it uses additional CSM tools you need to install for as dense reconstruction; it works great with different image sources.
3D Creator from Sony Xperia is really easy and awesome and avoid a lot of steps compared to this traditional method.
Agisoft Photoscan is far better than Colmap+ Meshlab.
For some problems, we can get suggestions from the comments.
I am trying to get into 3D computer modeling, and I want to model this new military helicopter for a video game (ARMA 3).
The problem is the chopper is extremely new and there are very few pics of it out there, so the background in each photo is always different. would these cause problems with modeling.
If you want to get some pretty amazing results using the basic version of Agisoft Photoscan ($179 US for a commercial license) and some very good results with VisualSFM (free for non-commercial use).
You can rotate the object as long as the background is in solid color. There are several solutions on the internet, mostly by programming Arduino to rotate turntable with the object, then sending remote shutter signal to the camera. This whole process can be automated with very good results:)

https://www.sculpteo.com/blog/2018/06/12/top-12-of-the-best-photogrammetry-software/?

https://all3dp.com/autodesk-123d-catch-review/

3D Printing News Alert(The sharp growth of increasing demand for 3D Printing)

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The sharp growth of increasing demand for 3D Printing.
According to Nano Dimension (Nasdaq, TASE: NNDM) is a leading electronics provider that is disrupting, reshaping, and defining the future of how cognitive connected products are made. With its unique 3D printing technologies, Nano Dimension is targeting the growing demand for electronic devices that require increasingly sophisticated features. Demand for circuitry, including PCBs – which are the heart of every electronic device – covers a diverse range of industries, including consumer electronics, medical devices, defense, aerospace, automotive, IoT and telecom. These sectors can all benefit greatly from Nano Dimension’s products and services for rapid prototyping and short-run manufacturing.
With Nano Dimension’s award-winning DragonFly™ Pro System for Precision Additive Manufacturing of Printed Electronics, which can simultaneously 3D print dielectric polymer and conductive metal, 3D printing of functional electronics essential to these industries can be prototyped more quickly and securely in-house than ever before, with lower costs. The DragonFly Pro System can also be used for customized low-volume production, thus making it essential in on-demand scenarios.

With its advanced capabilities, the Nano Dimension’s DragonFly Pro System is an IoT enabler at the heart of industry 4.0 convergence. Organizations are increasingly turning to this technology to meet stringent security requirements, adopt new 3D design opportunities and leverage more agile workflows”.

www.nano-di.com