356 days of 3D Printing, Why 3D Printing, history

What kind of Problems with LCD Resin 3D Printers. Different ways to fix it? Safety features.

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What is your comment?

Please read safety things before using anything –
It is hazardous and it may give you an allergic reaction that you really don’t want (been there still got the skin problem) but it’s not toxic or sometimes it can be. Respiratory Irritation
Breathing highly concentrated epoxy vapor can irritate the respiratory system and cause sensitization. Serious health problems can result from sanding epoxy before it is fully cured. When you inhale these dust particles, they become trapped in the mucous lining of your respiratory system. Because it can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation. And dust from polyurethane resin is highly toxic.
The pure epoxy resins are considered as non-toxic, the risk of damage caused by ingestion of epoxy resin can be considered as very small. Most curing agents in use today have certain toxicity. Inhalation of epoxy resins causes no problems as they are not volatile.
The difference is that SLA works by flashing a laser — a tiny dot of concentrated light — across a given area to harden it and create a layer. In contrast, DLP machines cure all areas of a layer simultaneously, by projecting light onto the resin in the shape of that layer.
We can use liquid resin to produce 3D prints. Since we are dealing with a liquid material, an additional support structure is necessary for overhanging parts and cavities. The average 3D printer material cost for standard SLA resins is approximately $50 per liter. That means entry-level, cheap resins may even be under $50. MakerJuice offers a standard resin for SLA 3D printing, which costs $58 per liter.
Many resins are actually quite toxic, and we wrote on this some time ago. … However, remember that some resins ARE safe, it’s just that many are not – and they should be treated appropriately. The second issue with resin 3D printing is curing, the process that makes the resin solid.

Comments from video,
Luis Rios
1 day ago
The LCD screen is a consumable item and it is not covered by the warranty on most manufacturers. They are not meant to last forever although I have found that they are very sensitive. You need to strain the resin after every print as any dried resin that is left in the vat will damage the pixels when the next print starts.
Luis Rios
22 hours ago
@ualdayan I have six resin printers and have been through the rounds. The LCD screen is a consumable. That has been stated to me directly by the manufacturers. If you read the fine print in the warranty you will see that stated as well. The life expectancy of an LCD screen is supposed to be close to 800 hours. I have never gotten close to that.
CHEP
18 hours ago
Great information. LCDs tend to be very temperature sensitive so maybe that is an issue.

StevesPropShop
1 day ago
As stated by others below, this is to do with UV Exposure and heat. Be wary of ‘high speed’ resins. They have a higher exothermic reaction rate which can also damage the LCD. Using an infrared thermometer i tested ‘AmeraLabs’ AMD-3 LED resin which is a super fast cure resin (2.5 sec per layer at 0.03) and it was curing at nearly 54 degrees Celsius on my mars. When the LCD’s are made they are supposed to have a UV filter film added to lengthen their lifespan which obviously they can’t do for these printers. I’ve had screens last months and screens last weeks. Theres nothing you can do to really affect it other than use standard curing resins that don’t give off as much heat and make sure you do usual checks to make sure your vat and build plate are clean etc etc.
zemerick13
15 hours ago
@Dean Rockne As someone that has built PCs…often quieter fans are the better ones actually. Better bearings, lower turbulence, more efficient…all of these make the fan quieter for the same or better cooling.
If heating manages to be a problem, it’d be nearly instant spot heating…which would be practically impossible to cool. Basically, you’d need to chill the resin in the reservoir so that any temperature increase is offset…and I don’t think the resin would respond too well to that. You’re supposed to keep them at room temperature.
Redemptioner1
13 hours ago (edited)
It’s a simple problem, the screens are not designed to work with the UV light, product of cheap printers they use cheap screens. You are looking at over $1000USD wholesale for a screen rated for the UV light to fit these printers, that’s a lot of $30 screen replacements

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Embroidery machine, with 3D, printed parts

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According to Hackaday, “Embroidery machine, with 3D, printed parts. Arduino components combined with 3D printed parts. OpenBuilds® V-Slot Belt & Pinion System.Such as an Arduino and stepper drivers for an economical DIY solution. It’s not shown in the photo here, but we particularly like the 3D printed sockets that are screwed into the tabletop. These hold the sewing machine’s “feet”, and allow it to be treated like a modular component that can easily be removed and used normally when needed.”

https://openbuilds.com/builds/v-slot%E2%84%A2-belt-pinion-example-build.97/

http://www.openbuilds.com

https://www.ozy.com/flashback/and-he-could-have-been-the-father-of-3d-printing/81198#.WeXu6REalHI.twitter

Request a free 3D print sample part

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Request a free 3D print sample part.

Please read our policies before requesting the sample:)
According to the Formlabs, “stereolithography (SLA) print process, and see how Formlabs prints compare to parts made from an extrusion-based fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printer:

Form 1+ is a stereolithography 3D printer. Today, we’re going to look at how it works and put it to the test against parts from an extrusion-based machine.

Let’s start by taking a closer look at the printer. When we open up the light blocking cover, we can see a build platform inside. This metal plate is where the parts are made.

Underneath the build platform is a liquid resin tank. This clear window gives the ultraviolet laser a path to cure the resin.

To start a print, we’ll upload a file, and fill up the resin tank to the indicator line. You can see the laser passing back and forth inside, hardening the liquid plastic.

Now, We’ll take our print out and wash it in rubbing alcohol to get the excess resin off. The flower comes with supports on it, and we’ll snip them off to finish the piece.

Stereolithography is known for producing extreme detail, with layers down to four times finer than a human hair.

The Form 1+ lets us take advantage of a library of materials, so we made some other parts to show what these resins can do.

A Castable Resin gives jewelers and engineers an inexpensive way to produce metal parts. This Flexible Resin is great for simulating different textures and as we can see, this Tough Resin and can really take a hit”.

 

https://formlabs.com/request-sample-part/?durable-ball-joint&utm_source=direct&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email-ashley-furniture&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTVdFNFlXWXlNV1JrWldRNSIsInQiOiJvN2lkTTVSamdXVjlYaUxXUTNsZUVNY2haZkZ6RWJ5QURoMjZwUHBqWGtEc0tpOURCeDlrTmVCXC9qRkJOZmN1Sjl3VVBoU2RjWndZY0JvTkFOM2VxeWt6SGpKSEN3RHlNT0k2NFJ4TjFYdjFGamI4Z3A5TjI0MXZtV0k0empvdVwvIn0%3D#/

 

3D Printing learning, modifying

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According to Jonathan Torta, a self-professed and his sister, Stephanie Torta, a designer, and the author, “technical jack-of-all-trades,” remembered the very first MakerBot kit he acquired and assembled. It was the little wooden ‘Cupcake’ that was very basic. It rattled all over the place, but it could print things. Mesmerized, he’s been “building and modifying 3D printers ever since. I thought that was pretty cool.”

http://www.merclearning.com/titles/3D_Printing_An_Introduction.html

https://steamuniverse.com/articles/2019/06/20/9-things-to-know-about-3d-printing-in-k12.aspx?m=1

Affordable 3D printed wheelchairs

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According to Brooke Thomas and David Calver, hosts of The Conversation, Affordable wheelchairs are changing lives in countries around the world.
According to some comments,
1 Wallace Wallaby,

“I’m a volunteer at an organization that 3d prints prosthetics for children recycled from plastic bottle tops. It’s pretty cool”.

2
Aaron Thompson,

“Love the effort and development that this guy is trying to build but I am skeptical that this is going to last. It seems that he 3d prints only some parts and a 3d printer produces a product with terrible strength and takes a ton of time and power to produce. Bolting simple parts together would be cheaper and repairable in the field”.

3
Steel Fox,

“I love me some 3D printing and I love his idea, but it is a terrible way to mass produce a product. If he was customizing each chair it would make sense. For something standardized molding would be better”.

4

bigraviolees,

“HE SHOULD team up with the guy who was mass producing lawn chairs to give to 3rd world poor folks who needed wheelchairs. He made an actual nice wheelchair in big numbers from lawn chairs and gets them out to people changing their lives”.

5

shutdafup,

“Take the zillions of tons of plastic bottles thrown away every year and mold them out of that the old fashioned way”.

6

Ed Roydlick,

“Should’ve 3D printed some wheelchair ramps as well”.

7

Tim Rox,

“Maybe they can even 3d print the tools too”.

 

https://www.participant.life/

3D Printing News Alert(The 3D printing’s role in lifesaving development before and now)

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The 3D printing’s role in lifesaving development before and now.

Published on 10 Jun 2009 by Koen Van Roy. According to Dr. Gabor Forgacs,” made that prediction. Now, he is making it a reality. Gabor is a University of Missouri researcher doing groundbreaking work in regenerative medicine. He is also the Scientific Founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Organovo, the latest company to receive support from you, the donors of the Methuselah Foundation”.

According to the Euronews Knowledge,” it was published on 10 Jul 2013.
Organ transplants have been a lifesaving development and one of the shining success stories of modern medicine. But the shortage of organs for transplantation is an ongoing problem. One answer is to grow them artificially in a laboratory – a promising although controversial solution.

The hope is to put human liver cells into that structure to see if they can grow and multiply into a fully functioning human liver.

Euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world’s most interesting know-hows, directly from Space and Sci-Tech experts”.

This is from the ‘Science Museum’s’ video, it was published on 8 Oct 2013. According to Materials scientist, Brian Derby,” thinks that it will be some time before working human organs can be 3D printed for transplant. But there are some surprising ways 3D printing can already heal you”.

Now— Artificial liver and transplantation by, SCOTT L. NYBERG.

According to some comments, and concerns,
1 Remon Michel
5 years ago
we hope so much develop this solution.

2 Ayy Foo It’s Modelo Time
3 years ago
Investing in this research.

3— zsdg15
6 years ago
So in 2075 when I’m 80 I can replace most of my organs with a younger version of my organs to live to 110? 😀

4 group
6 years ago
How do they regulate that the cells will divide? Like, do they only have cells in the bio-ink that are in S phase? How do they make the cells into mitosis?

5— Rebekkah Todd
6 years ago
I strongly recommend that everyone invest in this company now while the stock is still low – also, SSYS, DDD, and ADSK – you are looking at the future….if you have any spare money to invest at all…

7— TheKingdomOfDragons
6 years ago
OMG, that is SWEET 😀

8 Seeu anon
7 years ago
We need to support this! I am unwell and need medical help.

9— Jordan Quenneville
7 years ago
This blew my mind, but:
This process would be fantastic if say, a healthy organ was suddenly damaged. But what if the organ failed for other reasons, like old age? What are the implications of using old cells? Would the new organ fail more quickly then? Also, if the organ failed because of a genetic disorder, wouldn’t the new one be just at risk of mutation and failure?
In both these cases, what’s the longevity of these organs? What’s the longevity of an ideal printed organ?

10— djjmria
8 years ago
I need a new right arm, do they also make those?

11— ProGameDev101
9 years ago
Would Bio-engineering be the degree to get to help contribute to this type of technology?

12— booste30
9 years ago
This guy’s going to win the Nobel Prize.

13 Strawbz7209
9 years ago
This is one of the most amazing things I’ve ever seen.

14 Richard Monat
4 years ago
Thank you for your time. I forgot to respond on time. 3-D printing is a footprint on the snow or sand, that real explorers will track. God, I’d love to see, even what’s the beginning. What a future from that TOOL. Richard.

I hope everybody from the comments section, find this post and read about the latest research:)

 

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/aor.13448

https://www.mayo.edu/research/labs/artificial-liver-transplantation/overview

http://www.marketwatch.com/video/sectorwatch/how-medical-3d-printing-could-solve-the-shortage-of-organ-donations/43274A11-C66F-47E6-9E8E-0FB80119849A.html

https://www.mayoclinic.org

www.marketwatch.com