Author: babl

The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper

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The world’s first 3D printed brake caliper.
According to
Volkswagen Group, “The world’s largest 3D printed titanium pressure functional component ever produced on one of the most powerful brake test benches on the market! This is what it looks like when Bugatti prepares its first printed titanium brake caliper for series production.”

From comments,

Niels Cremer
Niels Cremer
7 months ago
Can 3d print brake calipers, can’t take higher frame rates for slow motion footage.

Reaper5.56 Xx
7 months ago
Can you 3d print better emission test.

Bassam Al-Rawi
7 months ago
Which 3D printer was used 😁

Qwerrrz
7 months ago
Looks like 3d printing just reached a new level. That’s insane.

Insert coolname
7 months ago
This is nothing new. I´ve seen 3D printed brake calipers in Formula Student cars.
vaporainwaves
7 months ago (edited)
I am pretty sure koenigsegg was faster to produce a functional 3D printed component from titanium. Outrageous.

MOTO-079
7 months ago
3d printed… still needs machining or are the brake pistons just gliding on a printed serves…

Callen Hurley
7 months ago
3D printing is the future of production.

Phar2Rekliss
7 months ago
Now lets see what 3D printed Inconel 750 parts can handle! Inconel is the next step level in material from Titanium for these kinds of purposes.

eLike
7 months ago
This brake caliper is made in ABS, people with a 3D printer will understand this.

Gavin 363
7 months ago
I’d be more impressed if the rotor was 3d printed.

Zachary Gamble
7 months ago
Not sure I would want a 3D printed caliper on my million dollar car.
SPIRIT01
7 months ago
Cnc machine is like a 3d metal printer , been around for a couple of years , idk I thought brembo and ceika , and all those other big brake kits I thought they had already printed out calipers.

sam sl
7 months ago
Just because things are 3D printed does not mean they are better.

kym516
7 months ago
Just saying, other manufacturers may have tested this idea before. I mean a 3d printed caliper can have lighter weight and better thermal control which is obvious enough for researches to be done. But still, good marketing peace of work. Hope this amazing technology can be used on consumer cars.

Boris Diamond
7 months ago
How hot was the calliper getting and how much was it deflecting? Mechanical properties are reduced at high temperatures, it’s impressive that it survived the test but I would like to know if it yielded or not and how many high load/temperature cycles it is capable of. It should be ok being Ti.
Oddvin Lorenzo Preinstad
7 months ago
3d printed car parts are probably normal in the future, imagine if your car breaks down and you have it brought to a mechanic. Today that mechanic has to order the parts which will take atleast multiple days, with 3d printed parts it is a matter of hours,
.

https://www.autoblog.com/2018/12/21/bugatti-3d-printed-titanium-brake-caliper-testing-video/

https://www.popsci.com/bugatti-chiron-3d-printed-titanium-brakes/

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The 3D printing a healthier world for everybody

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According to Materialise,” 3D printing is a slow revolution. But it is a revolution regardless when you consider what the technology does: saving lives, enabling new business models, redefining how we design products. But none of that happened overnight. The revolutionary nature of 3D printing grew over the decades, formed on a foundation of small but valuable steps.”

 

 

https://www.materialise.com/en/medical

Jabil’s plan for $42M medical 3D printing with 24 percent core EPS growth

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According to St. Petersburg-based Jabil (NYSE: JBL),” is set to make a $42 million investment in Albuquerque, New Mexico for technology and equipment as it makes the Duke City its “center of excellence” for 3D printing, officials announced on Aug. 15. The company said it plans to hire 120 employees in the next five years.”
According to New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham said in a statement “We have all the talent in the world right here in New Mexico, and when we build the infrastructure for a 21st-century economy, we will see more young adults stay here and more homegrown talent return here.”
According to CEO Mark Mondello, “I’m extremely pleased with our third-quarter performance, highlighted by solid operational excellence and strong financial results. The team delivered 20 basis points of core margin expansion on double-digit revenue growth, culminating in an impressive 24 percent core EPS growth, year-over-year. Our strong year-to-date results validate that our diversification strategy has firmly taken hold.”

Delivering insoles in 1/2 the time, at a fraction of the cost.

https://www.jabil.com/capabilities/3d-printing.html

https://www.jabil.com/

https://www.jabil.com/capabilities/medical-device-mechatronics.html

https://www.jabil.com/news/jabil-unveils-plans-for–42m-medical-3d-printing-center-of-excel.html

Jabil unveils plans for $42M medical 3D printing center of excellence

https://www.owler.com/reports/jabil/jabil–florida-manufacturing-giant-announces-plans/1565907397761

https://www.bizjournals.com/orlando/news/2019/08/16/florida-manufacturing-giant-announces-plans-to.html?

What kind of Problems with LCD Resin 3D Printers. Different ways to fix it? Safety features.

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What is your comment?

Please read safety things before using anything –
It is hazardous and it may give you an allergic reaction that you really don’t want (been there still got the skin problem) but it’s not toxic or sometimes it can be. Respiratory Irritation
Breathing highly concentrated epoxy vapor can irritate the respiratory system and cause sensitization. Serious health problems can result from sanding epoxy before it is fully cured. When you inhale these dust particles, they become trapped in the mucous lining of your respiratory system. Because it can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation. And dust from polyurethane resin is highly toxic.
The pure epoxy resins are considered as non-toxic, the risk of damage caused by ingestion of epoxy resin can be considered as very small. Most curing agents in use today have certain toxicity. Inhalation of epoxy resins causes no problems as they are not volatile.
The difference is that SLA works by flashing a laser — a tiny dot of concentrated light — across a given area to harden it and create a layer. In contrast, DLP machines cure all areas of a layer simultaneously, by projecting light onto the resin in the shape of that layer.
We can use liquid resin to produce 3D prints. Since we are dealing with a liquid material, an additional support structure is necessary for overhanging parts and cavities. The average 3D printer material cost for standard SLA resins is approximately $50 per liter. That means entry-level, cheap resins may even be under $50. MakerJuice offers a standard resin for SLA 3D printing, which costs $58 per liter.
Many resins are actually quite toxic, and we wrote on this some time ago. … However, remember that some resins ARE safe, it’s just that many are not – and they should be treated appropriately. The second issue with resin 3D printing is curing, the process that makes the resin solid.

Comments from video,
Luis Rios
1 day ago
The LCD screen is a consumable item and it is not covered by the warranty on most manufacturers. They are not meant to last forever although I have found that they are very sensitive. You need to strain the resin after every print as any dried resin that is left in the vat will damage the pixels when the next print starts.
Luis Rios
22 hours ago
@ualdayan I have six resin printers and have been through the rounds. The LCD screen is a consumable. That has been stated to me directly by the manufacturers. If you read the fine print in the warranty you will see that stated as well. The life expectancy of an LCD screen is supposed to be close to 800 hours. I have never gotten close to that.
CHEP
18 hours ago
Great information. LCDs tend to be very temperature sensitive so maybe that is an issue.

StevesPropShop
1 day ago
As stated by others below, this is to do with UV Exposure and heat. Be wary of ‘high speed’ resins. They have a higher exothermic reaction rate which can also damage the LCD. Using an infrared thermometer i tested ‘AmeraLabs’ AMD-3 LED resin which is a super fast cure resin (2.5 sec per layer at 0.03) and it was curing at nearly 54 degrees Celsius on my mars. When the LCD’s are made they are supposed to have a UV filter film added to lengthen their lifespan which obviously they can’t do for these printers. I’ve had screens last months and screens last weeks. Theres nothing you can do to really affect it other than use standard curing resins that don’t give off as much heat and make sure you do usual checks to make sure your vat and build plate are clean etc etc.
zemerick13
15 hours ago
@Dean Rockne As someone that has built PCs…often quieter fans are the better ones actually. Better bearings, lower turbulence, more efficient…all of these make the fan quieter for the same or better cooling.
If heating manages to be a problem, it’d be nearly instant spot heating…which would be practically impossible to cool. Basically, you’d need to chill the resin in the reservoir so that any temperature increase is offset…and I don’t think the resin would respond too well to that. You’re supposed to keep them at room temperature.
Redemptioner1
13 hours ago (edited)
It’s a simple problem, the screens are not designed to work with the UV light, product of cheap printers they use cheap screens. You are looking at over $1000USD wholesale for a screen rated for the UV light to fit these printers, that’s a lot of $30 screen replacements

Spectroplast silicone 3D printing got €1.4m investment from AM Ventures

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Spectroplast AG has developed a high-precision 3D printing technology for pure silicone, enabling the production of complex soft medical implants. Spectroplast’s Silicones are compatible with the latest SLA and DLP Technology, innovation lies in providing a cutting-edge material technology that makes industry-standard Silicones accessible to Additive Manufacturing.

According to Johann Oberhofern and Manuel Schaffner, Chief Technology Officer at Spectroplast, TCT Magazine, AM Ventures,” introduction of silicones to the world of additive manufacturing is well-timed with the rapidly growing demand for customized silicone products that we not only observe in the healthcare sector but also in many other markets.
As an industry, we are just starting to understand how powerful 3D printing of functional products will become when it is combined with the massive potential offered by industrial-scale production. Having the financial support and domain expertise of AMV will help us execute our mission even more rapidly and broadly.”

https://www.tctmagazine.com/3d-printing-news/spectroplast-silicone-3d-printing-service-investment-am-ventures/

https://spectroplast.com/

Start

Embroidery machine, with 3D, printed parts

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According to Hackaday, “Embroidery machine, with 3D, printed parts. Arduino components combined with 3D printed parts. OpenBuilds® V-Slot Belt & Pinion System.Such as an Arduino and stepper drivers for an economical DIY solution. It’s not shown in the photo here, but we particularly like the 3D printed sockets that are screwed into the tabletop. These hold the sewing machine’s “feet”, and allow it to be treated like a modular component that can easily be removed and used normally when needed.”

https://openbuilds.com/builds/v-slot%E2%84%A2-belt-pinion-example-build.97/

http://www.openbuilds.com

https://www.ozy.com/flashback/and-he-could-have-been-the-father-of-3d-printing/81198#.WeXu6REalHI.twitter

Materialise reports the Second quarter and now, 2019 results

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Materialise incorporates nearly 30 years of 3D printing experience into a range of software solutions and 3D printing services, which form the backbone of the 3D printing industry.
According to Materialise,” Let’s discuss ways how we can empower people to design, collaborate, build, and fabricate in more sustainable ways, while reducing waste, saving money, and staying competitive. At the end of the second quarter of 2019, the total commitment of lease assets and liabilities amounted to 5,050 kEUR. Our Adjusted EBITDA for the second quarter of 2019 was affected positively by the new standard as a result of the rental payments decrease of 644 kEUR; however, our operating profit was impacted by only 52 kEUR as depreciation expenses increased by 593 kEUR.
Materialise, Will acquire a mix of existing and new shares bringing its total shareholding to 75%, with the founding shareholders retaining the remaining 25%. All shares will be fully paid for in cash at the closing, which is expected to take place during the week of August 5, 2019.”

According to Materialise reports the Second quarter and now, 2019 Results, Executive Chairman Peter Leys commented, “In spite of a macro-economic environment that continues to be challenging, Materialise reported another quarter of top-line growth. This was mainly driven by Materialise Medical, which continued to perform strongly with solid revenue growth and EBITDA performance, and also by Materialise Manufacturing, which realized a double-digit EBITDA margin and grew its revenues for the third consecutive quarter.

This quarter, the contribution by Materialise Software to our revenue growth and Adjusted EBITDA margin was below our expectations as a number of sales were pushed out to the second half of the year. Our outlook for 2019 remains within our previous guidance range, with our results now including expected contributions from our August acquisition of a 75% stake in Engimplan.

This investment, which will enable us to introduce the benefits of Materialise’s patient-specific 3D printing implants and expertise to the fast-growing Brazil market, is part of our strategy to accelerate our growing presence in the additive manufacturing ecosystem through carefully selected acquisitions and partnerships.”

https://www.materialise.com/en

https://www.materialise.com/en/press-releases/materialise-reports-second-quarter-2019-results

Relativity Space to build the first rocket 3D Printing factory

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With backing from NASA, rocket startup Relativity Space is creating the first autonomous rocket factory. The company is planning to produce 95% of rocket components with 3D printing, and the first orbital launch is expected in late 2020.

 

This is a guest contribution by Egor Driagin, Chief Marketing Officer at Top 3D Shop

image1.png

Source: www.relativityspace.com

The new agreement will provide the California-based startup with exclusive access to NASA’s infrastructure and financial aid from the Mississippi Development Authority for building a large-scale highly automated 3D printing rocket factory. The company will lease a 20,000-square-meter building at NASA’s John C. Stennis Space Center for nine years. The test stands and all the necessary equipment on the site allow for convenient engine testing. The agreement provides an option to extend the lease for another 10 years. The company aims to create 200 jobs and invest $59 million in the state. In exchange, the state of Mississippi offers a reimbursement of expenses and a tax incentive package.

image2.jpgSource: www.relativityspace.com

The new factory will produce Relativity Space’s first 3D printed rocket – Terran 1. This vehicle can carry up to 2,756 lbs. into low Earth orbit. Both stages will be powered by 3D printed Aeon engines fueled by methane and liquid oxygen. The first stage will be powered by nine engines, stage two will be equipped with only one. The rocket is priced at $10 million per launch. It is expected that due to the use of the 3D printing technology the manufacturing cycle will not exceed 60 days. 

Although the company is planning to construct its own launch facility, the first rockets will be launched from Cape Canaveral. The launchpad and all the supporting infrastructure will be provided by the U.S. Air Force. The company was allowed to use Launch Complex (LC) 16, which was built for tests of Titan I and Titan II, and then Pershing I and Pershing II missiles. The last launch took place there in 1988. 

image3.png

 

Source: www.relativityspace.com

Most of the metal parts will be manufactured by Stargate, Relativity Space’s first 3D printer. The scalable system features multi-axis robotic arms with lasers. The machine uses metal wire feedstock as a printing material. In February 2019, Relativity Space was granted a machine learning 3D metal printing patent, issued for “real-time adaptive control of additive manufacturing processes using machine learning” (US20180341248A1).

“This agreement demonstrates again NASA’s commitment to work with our industry partners to expand commercial access to low Earth orbit. This helps NASA maintain focus on the ambitious Artemis program that will land the first female and the next male on the south pole of the Moon by 2024,” said Rick Gilbrech, director of  Stennis Space Center. “Relativity is a valuable member of the Stennis federal city and we look forward to building on our already successful partnership.”

The first orbital launch is expected in 2020. The company is planning to enter the commercial market in 2021.