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Mustang Shelby GT500 with 3D printed brake parts

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Ford Mustang Shelby GT500-Dual-Clutch or 10-Speed Automatic.
According to Ford, it is “using 3D printing in the manufacturing world, bridging the gap between abstract and practical.” The company is “fully invested in the latest commercial 3D printing innovations.”
Pricing for the 2018 Ford Shelby Super Snake starts at $113,445, including the donor Mustang.
2019 Shelby GT500 Top Speed is Over 200 MPH. The S197 generation of the Ford Mustang in Shelby GT500 form could top 202 miles per hour (325 km/h) at the Nardo test track in Italy.

The Super Snake, available with an automatic or manual transmission, begins as a Mustang GT with its 5.0-liter V-8, but a supercharger and tuning kick it up to a claimed 670 horsepower. Pay extra for a Whipple or Kenne Bell supercharger, and Shelby claims the engine will generate up to 750 horsepower.

http://www.autonews.com/article/20181204/OEM01/181209873/mustang-shelby-gt-ford-3d-augmented-reality-michigan

https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/2018/12/04/shelby-mustang-ford-manufacturing-parts/2205519002/

https://corporate.ford.com/homepage.html

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3-D Printing Ice Cream(3D Printed Food recipe (Chew ))

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Graduate students learned how to 3-D print ice cream in an additive manufacturing course at MIT.

According to John Hart, the Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor in Contemporary Technology and Mechanical Engineering at MIT,” says early education on 3-D printing is the key to helping the technology expand as an industry. I very much enjoyed creating and teaching the course and I’m proud of what the students did, and what it means about the future potential of additive manufacturing. The students’ final projects have included printers that they built specially to print molten glass and even soft-serve ice cream”.

http://news.mit.edu/2016/mit-course-3-d-printing-101-0511

 

 

WSU researchers 3D printed glucose biosensors

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WSU researchers create 3D-printed glucose biosensors. According to Arda Gozen and Yuehe Lin, faculty in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, the research has been published in the journal Analytica Chimica Acta,” 3D printing can enable manufacturing of biosensors tailored specifically to individual patients. This can potentially bring down the cost. For large‑scale use, the printed biosensors will need to be integrated with electronic components on a wearable platform. But, manufacturers could use the same 3D printer nozzles used for printing the sensors to print electronics and other components of a wearable medical device, helping to consolidate manufacturing processes and reduce costs, even more.

Our 3D printed glucose sensor will be used as the wearable sensor for replacing painful finger pricking. Since this is a noninvasive, needleless technique for glucose monitoring, it will be easier for children’s glucose monitoring”.

3D‑printed glucose biosensors created by WSU

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003267018310705?via%3Dihub

3D Print and Veterans throughout the nation

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According to the Veterans Affairs Center for Innovation (VACI),” recently launched the first nationwide medical 3D printing network through a collaboration with Stratasys, one of the largest manufacturers of 3D printers globally. As part of this effort, five 3D printers donated by Stratasys were installed in VA hospitals across the country, including Albuquerque, Boston, Orlando, San Antonio and Seattle”.

Veterans throughout the nation.

According to Garrett Grindle, a research scientist for HERL, says, “3D printing allows us an almost unlimited ability to customize the parts we need—because anything we can draw upon a computer, it can print out!””It’s really hard to make these devices in small quantities. 3D printing allows us to do that,” he tells us. Grindle also said that 3D printers make it easier to create contoured devices than current manufacturing techniques can. He cited a contoured joystick created by a HERL associate to fit the associate’s own hand and help him control his powered wheelchair. We want people to look at what people are using and say, ‘Wow! ‘That gear is as cool as a new cell phone. We’re doing this to get new technology into the hands of Veterans quickly’.

https://www.cleveland.va.gov/

3-D printing program creates customized products to assist Veterans in their rehabilitation

VA center using 3D printing to create devices to help Veterans feel whole

https://www.albuquerque.va.gov/pressreleases/3DOpenHouseRel040717.asp

https://www.visn4.va.gov/herl-3d-printing.asp