san Francisco

Minimize and manage plastic waste with 3D printing

Posted on Updated on

Minimize and manage plastic waste with 3D printing.
We can control and minimize plastic use because plastics provide health, safety for something useful. The plastic has convenience and benefits. If we use plastic carefully and recycle in a proper manner. It will be beneficial for so many aspects.

We can use 3D printing to save humanity. But, most important thing is that plastic waste does not belong in our environment.
What we should do to protect more harm.
Toronto-based biotechnology startup, Genecis is developing a synthetic biology platform to convert organic waste into premium chemicals and materials.
According to Marcelo Lu, President of BASF Canada, BASF seeks to work with innovative partners to strategically solve today’s global challenges,” We are proud to support a Canadian startup company which is providing a sustainable solution for organic waste. PHBVs, a high-quality biodegradable plastic that is used to make thermo-resistant packaging, compostable coffee pods, and 3D printing filaments”.
BASF accelerates its outreach towards technologies like artificial intelligence, internet of things and robotics. BASF is based, San Francisco, California, and Ludwigshafen, Germany.
According to Markus Solibieda, Managing Director at BASF Venture Capital,“ Alchemist has built a strong reputation for attracting the best in the digital ecosystem. We are thrilled to officially join Alchemist as a Limited Partner. Digitalization represents unprecedented opportunities to create value for our customers and develop new business models. By investing in a digitally-focused fund, we promote innovations at the intersection of chemicals and technologies like artificial intelligence, internet of things and robotics”,

https://www.basf.com/us/en.html

Advertisements

Prevent defects in metal 3D-printed parts

Posted on Updated on

Prevent defects in metal 3D-printed parts. Using this technology could have been benefited to build high rise buildings in San Francisco California.

According to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers, “High-speed images of a common laser-based metal 3D printing process, coupled with newly updated computer models, have revealed the mechanisms behind material redistribution, a phenomenon that leads to defects in printed metal parts”.

https://www.llnl.gov/news/lab-report

 

https://www.llnl.gov/news/llnl-explores-machine-learning-prevent-defects-metal-3d-printed-parts-real-time